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As discussed in #991, this converts the readme from SimpleMarkup to M…

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1 parent 2c100b9 commit df3a0680a9ac5de69938a1aac61db66e6553c604 @miketheman miketheman committed Jul 9, 2012
Showing with 68 additions and 63 deletions.
  1. +1 −1 .document
  2. +66 −61 README.rdoc → README.md
  3. +1 −1 fog.gemspec
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2 .document
@@ -1,3 +1,3 @@
-README.rdoc
+README.md
lib/**/*.rb
bin/*
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127 README.rdoc → README.md
@@ -1,131 +1,136 @@
-http://geemus.s3.amazonaws.com/fog.png
+![fog](http://geemus.s3.amazonaws.com/fog.png)
fog is the Ruby cloud computing library, top to bottom:
* Collections provide a simplified interface, making clouds easier to work with and switch between.
* Requests allow power users to get the most out of the features of each individual cloud.
* Mocks make testing and integrating a breeze.
-== Getting Started
+## Getting Started
- sudo gem install fog
+ sudo gem install fog
-Now type 'fog' to try stuff, confident that fog will let you know what to do. Here is an example of wading through server creation for Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud:
+Now type `fog` to try stuff, confident that fog will let you know what to do.
+Here is an example of wading through server creation for Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud:
- >> server = Compute[:aws].servers.create
- ArgumentError: image_id is required for this operation
+ >> server = Compute[:aws].servers.create
+ ArgumentError: image_id is required for this operation
- >> server = Compute[:aws].servers.create(:image_id => 'ami-5ee70037')
- <Fog::AWS::EC2::Server [...]>
+ >> server = Compute[:aws].servers.create(:image_id => 'ami-5ee70037')
+ <Fog::AWS::EC2::Server [...]>
- >> server.destroy # cleanup after yourself or regret it, trust me
- true
+ >> server.destroy # cleanup after yourself or regret it, trust me
+ true
-== Collections
+## Collections
A high level interface to each cloud is provided through collections, such as `images` and `servers`.
-You can see a list of available collections by calling `collections` on the connection object. You can try it out using the `fog` command:
+You can see a list of available collections by calling `collections` on the connection object.
+You can try it out using the `fog` command:
- >> Compute[:aws].collections
- [:addresses, :directories, ..., :volumes, :zones]
+ >> Compute[:aws].collections
+ [:addresses, :directories, ..., :volumes, :zones]
Some collections are available across multiple providers:
-* compute providers have +flavors+, +images+ and +servers+
-* dns providers have +zones+ and +records+
-* storage providers have +directories+ and +files+
+* compute providers have `flavors`, `images` and `servers`
+* dns providers have `zones` and `records`
+* storage providers have `directories` and `files`
Collections share basic CRUD type operations, such as:
-* +all+ - fetch every object of that type from the provider.
-* +create+ - initialize a new record locally and a remote resource with the provider.
-* +get+ - fetch a single object by it's identity from the provider.
-* +new+ - initialize a new record locally, but do not create a remote resource with the provider.
+
+* `all` - fetch every object of that type from the provider.
+* `create` - initialize a new record locally and a remote resource with the provider.
+* `get` - fetch a single object by it's identity from the provider.
+* `new` - initialize a new record locally, but do not create a remote resource with the provider.
As an example, we'll try initializing and persisting a Rackspace Cloud server:
- require 'fog'
+ require 'fog'
- compute = Fog::Compute.new(
- :provider => 'Rackspace',
- :rackspace_api_key => key,
- :rackspace_username => username
- )
+ compute = Fog::Compute.new(
+ :provider => 'Rackspace',
+ :rackspace_api_key => key,
+ :rackspace_username => username
+ )
- # boot a gentoo server (flavor 1 = 256, image 3 = gentoo 2008.0)
- server = compute.servers.create(:flavor_id => 1, :image_id => 3, :name => 'my_server')
- server.wait_for { ready? } # give server time to boot
+ # boot a gentoo server (flavor 1 = 256, image 3 = gentoo 2008.0)
+ server = compute.servers.create(:flavor_id => 1, :image_id => 3, :name => 'my_server')
+ server.wait_for { ready? } # give server time to boot
- # DO STUFF
+ # DO STUFF
- server.destroy # cleanup after yourself or regret it, trust me
+ server.destroy # cleanup after yourself or regret it, trust me
-== Models
+## Models
Many of the collection methods return individual objects, which also provide common methods:
-* +destroy+ - will destroy the persisted object from the provider
-* +save+ - persist the object to the provider
-* +wait_for+ - takes a block and waits for either the block to return true for the object or for a timeout (defaults to 10 minutes)
-== Mocks
+* `destroy` - will destroy the persisted object from the provider
+* `save` - persist the object to the provider
+* `wait_for` - takes a block and waits for either the block to return true for the object or for a timeout (defaults to 10 minutes)
+
+## Mocks
As you might imagine, testing code using Fog can be slow and expensive, constantly turning on and and shutting down instances.
Mocking allows skipping this overhead by providing an in memory representation resources as you make requests.
Enabling mocking easy to use, before you run other commands, simply run:
- Fog.mock!
+ Fog.mock!
-Then proceed as usual, if you run into unimplemented mocks fog will raise an error and as always contributions are welcome!
+Then proceed as usual, if you run into unimplemented mocks, fog will raise an error and as always contributions are welcome!
-== Requests
+## Requests
Requests allow you to dive deeper when the models just can't cut it.
-You can see a list of available requests by calling #requests on the connection object.
+You can see a list of available requests by calling `#requests` on the connection object.
For instance, ec2 provides methods related to reserved instances that don't have any models (yet). Here is how you can lookup your reserved instances:
- $ fog
- >> Compute[:aws].describe_reserved_instances
- #<Excon::Response [...]>
+ $ fog
+ >> Compute[:aws].describe_reserved_instances
+ #<Excon::Response [...]>
-It will return an {excon}[http://github.com/geemus/excon] response, which has `body`, `headers` and `status`. Both return nice hashes.
+It will return an [excon](http://github.com/geemus/excon) response, which has `body`, `headers` and `status`. Both return nice hashes.
-== Go forth and conquer
+## Go forth and conquer
-Play around and use the console to explore or check out {fog.io}[http://fog.io] for more details and examples. Once you are ready to start scripting fog, here is a quick hint on how to make connections without the command line thing to help you.
+Play around and use the console to explore or check out [fog.io](http://fog.io) for more details and examples.
+Once you are ready to start scripting fog, here is a quick hint on how to make connections without the command line thing to help you.
- # create a compute connection
- compute = Fog::Compute.new(:provider => 'AWS', :aws_access_key_id => ACCESS_KEY_ID, :aws_secret_access_key => SECRET_ACCESS_KEY)
- # compute operations go here
+ # create a compute connection
+ compute = Fog::Compute.new(:provider => 'AWS', :aws_access_key_id => ACCESS_KEY_ID, :aws_secret_access_key => SECRET_ACCESS_KEY)
+ # compute operations go here
- # create a storage connection
- storage = Fog::Storage.new(:provider => 'AWS', :aws_access_key_id => ACCESS_KEY_ID, :aws_secret_access_key => SECRET_ACCESS_KEY)
- # storage operations go here
+ # create a storage connection
+ storage = Fog::Storage.new(:provider => 'AWS', :aws_access_key_id => ACCESS_KEY_ID, :aws_secret_access_key => SECRET_ACCESS_KEY)
+ # storage operations go here
geemus says: "That should give you everything you need to get started, but let me know if there is anything I can do to help!"
-== Contributing
+## Contributing
* Find something you would like to work on. For suggestions look for the `easy`, `medium` and `hard` tags in the {issues}[http://github.com/fog/fog/issues]
* Fork the project and do your work in a topic branch.
* Add shindo tests to prove your code works and run all the tests using `bundle exec rake`.
* Rebase your branch against fog/fog to make sure everything is up to date.
* Commit your changes and send a pull request.
-== Additional Resources
+## Additional Resources
-{fog.io}[http://fog.io]
+[fog.io](http://fog.io)
-== Sponsorship
+## Sponsorship
-http://www.engineyard.com/images/logo.png
+![Engine Yard](http://www.engineyard.com/images/logo.png)
-All new work on fog is sponsored by {Engine Yard}[http://engineyard.com]
+All new work on fog is sponsored by [Engine Yard](http://engineyard.com)
-== Copyright
+## Copyright
(The MIT License)
-Copyright (c) 2010 {geemus (Wesley Beary)}[http://github.com/geemus]
+Copyright (c) 2010 [geemus (Wesley Beary)](http://github.com/geemus)
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining
a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the
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2 fog.gemspec
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ Gem::Specification.new do |s|
## Specify any RDoc options here. You'll want to add your README and
## LICENSE files to the extra_rdoc_files list.
s.rdoc_options = ["--charset=UTF-8"]
- s.extra_rdoc_files = %w[README.rdoc]
+ s.extra_rdoc_files = %w[README.md]
## List your runtime dependencies here. Runtime dependencies are those
## that are needed for an end user to actually USE your code.

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