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The library provides hashtable-like interface to manipulate data distributed across Erlang processes.

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README
Process Term Storage (PTS)
**************************

Copyright (C) 2012, Dmitry Kolesnikov

   This file is free documentation; unlimited permissions are give to copy, 
distribute and modify the documentation. 


   This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License, version 3.0
as published by the Free Software Foundation.


Introduction
============

   The library provides hashtable-like interface to manage processes
namespace, and read/write access the process state.


Compile and build
=================

   The library source code is available at git repository

   git clone https://github.com/fogfish/pts.git
   
   Briefly, the shell command `make' should configure and build, the library.
   
Use-cases
=========

   The library assumes existence of two type of processes `actors': 
   
   * data owner is an Erlang/OTP process that holds chunk of data and 
   manages its life-cycle.   
   
   * data consumer is process that leases data for transient operation

   The contract between those actors are namespace and key, the namespace
defines a data domain and key identifies a process that holds data. In other
words, pts is like ets but each entry is kept is dedicated `data owner' process; the library defines 

   * an unified `data consumers' interface for data discovery and I/O
   
   * an unified asynchronous protocol for `data owners'

Interface
=========

   Briefly, the sequence of operations for `data consume' is following; see the
src/pts.erl file for detailed interface specification and/or example cache
application.

   %% create a new table and define a factory function
   ok = pts:new(mytable, [{factory, fun my_entry_sup:create/1}]),
   
   %% put a value into process bound to mykey, if such process do not exists
   %% the factory function is called to spawn a new process
   ok = pts:put(mytable, mykey, "my value"),
   
   %%
   %% read value from process
   {ok, Value} = pts:get(mytable, mykey),
   
   %% clean up
   pts:drop(mytable).
   

Protocol
========
   
   Each `data owner' process has to be complient with asynchronous protocol
See reference implementation at src/pts_cache.erl: 
   
   1. Factory
      The factory function shall take two parameters Namespace and Key 

   2. Put
      handle_info({put, Tx, Key, Val}, ...) ->
         gen_server:reply(Tx, ok),
         {noreply, ...}

   3. Get
      handle_info({get, Tx, Key}, ...) ->
         gen_server:reply(Tx, {ok, Val}),
         {noreply, ...}

   4. Remove data
      handle_info({remove, Tx, Key}, ...) ->
         gen_server:reply(Tx, ok),
         {stop, normal, ...}
   
   
Performance
===========

   The performance is estimated for storage containing 10000 key/value pairs.
The key is md5 hash, the value is 1KB data block. 

   Hardware reference platform: MacMini, Lion Server, 2 GHz Intel Core i7, 8GB 1333 MHZ DDR3, erlang R15B
   
put by 10 process 10000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            1799.712
Completed:              10000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    5556.4
Latency (ms):           0.180
IO tput (MB):           5.511 (9.918 written, 0.000 read)


get by 10 process 10000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            140.799
Completed:              10000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    71023.4
Latency (ms):           0.014
IO tput (MB):           70.443 (9.918 written, 0.000 read)


get by 100 process 100000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            1171.940
Completed:              100000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    85328.6
Latency (ms):           0.012
IO tput (MB):           84.631 (99.182 written, 0.000 read)


get by 1000 process 1000000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            12538.887
Completed:              1000000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    79751.9
Latency (ms):           0.013
IO tput (MB):           79.100 (991.821 written, 0.000 read)


   pts is compared to ets with exactly same dataset

put by 10 process 10000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            1691.288
Completed:              10000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    5912.7
Latency (ms):           0.169
IO tput (MB):           5.864 (9.918 written, 0.000 read)


get by 10 process 10000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            10.630
Completed:              10000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    940769.2
Latency (ms):           0.001
IO tput (MB):           933.075 (9.918 written, 0.000 read)


get by 100 process 100000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            45.566
Completed:              100000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    2194641.9
Latency (ms):           0.000
IO tput (MB):           2176.693 (99.182 written, 0.000 read)


get by 1000 process 1000000 times
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wclock (ms):            216.048
Completed:              1000000
Failed:                 0 (0.00%)
TPS:                    4628605.0
Latency (ms):           0.000
IO tput (MB):           4590.749 (991.821 written, 0.000 read)

   








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