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Templatetags reference

paginate

Usage:

{% paginate entries %}

After this call, the entries variable in the template context is replaced by only the entries of the current page.

You can also keep your entries original variable (usually a queryset) and add to the context another name that refers to entries of the current page, e.g.:

{% paginate entries as page_entries %}

The as argument is also useful when a nested context variable is provided as queryset. In this case, and only in this case, the resulting variable name is mandatory, e.g.:

{% paginate entries.all as entries %}

The number of paginated entries is taken from settings, but you can override the default locally, e.g.:

{% paginate 20 entries %}

Of course you can mix it all:

{% paginate 20 entries as paginated_entries %}

By default, the first page is displayed the first time you load the page, but you can change this, e.g.:

{% paginate entries starting from page 3 %}

When changing the default page, it is also possible to reference the last page (or the second last page, and so on) by using negative indexes, e.g:

{% paginate entries starting from page -1 %}

This can be also achieved using a template variable that was passed to the context, e.g.:

{% paginate entries starting from page page_number %}

If the passed page number does not exist, the first page is displayed. Note that negative indexes are specific to the {% paginate %} tag: this feature cannot be used when contents are lazy paginated (see lazy_paginate below).

If you have multiple paginations in the same page, you can change the querydict key for the single pagination, e.g.:

{% paginate entries using article_page %}

In this case article_page is intended to be a context variable, but you can hardcode the key using quotes, e.g.:

{% paginate entries using 'articles_at_page' %}

Again, you can mix it all (the order of arguments is important):

{% paginate 20 entries starting from page 3 using page_key as paginated_entries %}

Additionally you can pass a path to be used for the pagination:

{% paginate 20 entries using page_key with pagination_url as paginated_entries %}

This way you can easily create views acting as API endpoints, and point your Ajax calls to that API. In this case pagination_url is considered a context variable, but it is also possible to hardcode the URL, e.g.:

{% paginate 20 entries with "/mypage/" %}

If you want the first page to contain a different number of items than subsequent pages, you can separate the two values with a comma, e.g. if you want 3 items on the first page and 10 on other pages:

{% paginate 3,10 entries %}

You must use this tag before calling the show_more, get_pages or show_pages ones.

lazy_paginate

Paginate objects without hitting the database with a select count query. Usually pagination requires hitting the database to get the total number of items to display. Lazy pagination avoids this select count query and results in a faster page load, with a disadvantage: you won't know the total number of pages in advance.

Use this in the same way as paginate tag when you are not interested in the total number of pages.

The lazy_paginate tag can take all the args of the paginate one, with one exception: negative indexes can not be passed to the starting from page argument.

show_more

Show the link to get the next page in a :doc:`twitter_pagination`. Usage:

{% show_more %}

Alternatively you can override the label passed to the default template:

{% show_more "even more" %}

You can override the loading text too:

{% show_more "even more" "working" %}

Must be called after paginate or lazy_paginate.

get_pages

Usage:

{% get_pages %}

This is mostly used for :doc:`digg_pagination`.

This call inserts in the template context a pages variable, as a sequence of page links. You can use pages in different ways:

  • just print pages and you will get Digg-style pagination displayed:
{{ pages }}
  • display pages count:
{{ pages|length }}
  • check if the page list contains more than one page:
{{ pages.paginated }}
{# the following is equivalent #}
{{ pages|length > 1 }}
  • get a specific page:
{# the current selected page #}
{{ pages.current }}

{# the first page #}
{{ pages.first }}

{# the last page #}
{{ pages.last }}

{# the previous page (or nothing if you are on first page) #}
{{ pages.previous }}

{# the next page (or nothing if you are in last page) #}
{{ pages.next }}

{# the third page #}
{{ pages.3 }}
{# this means page.1 is the same as page.first #}

{# the 1-based index of the first item on the current page #}
{{ pages.current_start_index }}

{# the 1-based index of the last item on the current page #}
{{ pages.current_end_index }}

{# the total number of objects, across all pages #}
{{ pages.total_count }}

{# the first page represented as an arrow #}
{{ pages.first_as_arrow }}

{# the last page represented as an arrow #}
{{ pages.last_as_arrow }}
  • iterate over pages to get all pages:
{% for page in pages %}
    {# display page link #}
    {{ page }}

    {# the page url (beginning with "?") #}
    {{ page.url }}

    {# the page path #}
    {{ page.path }}

    {# the page number #}
    {{ page.number }}

    {# a string representing the page (commonly the page number) #}
    {{ page.label }}

    {# check if the page is the current one #}
    {{ page.is_current }}

    {# check if the page is the first one #}
    {{ page.is_first }}

    {# check if the page is the last one #}
    {{ page.is_last }}
{% endfor %}

You can change the variable name, e.g.:

{% get_pages as page_links %}

This must be called after paginate or lazy_paginate.

show_pages

Show page links. Usage:

{% show_pages %}

It is just a shortcut for:

{% get_pages %}
{{ pages }}

You can set ENDLESS_PAGINATION_PAGE_LIST_CALLABLE in your settings.py to a callable used to customize the pages that are displayed. ENDLESS_PAGINATION_PAGE_LIST_CALLABLE can also be a dotted path representing a callable, e.g.:

ENDLESS_PAGINATION_PAGE_LIST_CALLABLE = 'path.to.callable'

The callable takes the current page number and the total number of pages, and must return a sequence of page numbers that will be displayed.

The sequence can contain other values:

  • 'previous': will display the previous page in that position;
  • 'next': will display the next page in that position;
  • 'first': will display the first page as an arrow;
  • 'last': will display the last page as an arrow;
  • None: a separator will be displayed in that position.

Here is an example of a custom callable that displays the previous page, then the first page, then a separator, then the current page, and finally the last page:

def get_page_numbers(current_page, num_pages):
    return ('previous', 1, None, current_page, 'last')

If ENDLESS_PAGINATION_PAGE_LIST_CALLABLE is None the internal callable endless_pagination.utils.get_page_numbers is used, generating a Digg-style pagination.

An alternative implementation is available: endless_pagination.utils.get_elastic_page_numbers: it adapts its output to the number of pages, making it arguably more usable when there are many of them.

This must be called after paginate or lazy_paginate.

show_current_number

Show the current page number, or insert it in the context.

This tag can for example be useful to change the page title according to the current page number.

To just show current page number:

{% show_current_number %}

If you use multiple paginations in the same page, you can get the page number for a specific pagination using the querystring key, e.g.:

{% show_current_number using mykey %}

The default page when no querystring is specified is 1. If you changed it in the paginate template tag, you have to call show_current_number according to your choice, e.g.:

{% show_current_number starting from page 3 %}

This can be also achieved using a template variable you passed to the context, e.g.:

{% show_current_number starting from page page_number %}

You can of course mix it all (the order of arguments is important):

{% show_current_number starting from page 3 using mykey %}

If you want to insert the current page number in the context, without actually displaying it in the template, use the as argument, i.e.:

{% show_current_number as page_number %}
{% show_current_number starting from page 3 using mykey as page_number %}