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README.md

Fractalite

A prototype to help explore development ideas for the next version of Fractal.

Features & Status | Demo | Documentation

Development work on a potential Fractal v2 release was halted a while ago after it became clear that it incorporated too many conceptual changes from v1 and the codebase had become too large and unwieldy.

This prototype has been create to explore a middle ground, (hopefully) incorporating many of the v2 improvements into a package that is conceptually much closer to the current fractal v1.x release.

πŸ“£ We need your feedback! πŸ“£

The aim of this prototype is to provide the ground work for the next version of Fractal. It's very much a work in progress and we'd love to get as much input from the community as possible to help shape that process.

Please let us know your thoughts by opening a new issue using the 'Feedback' issue template or by jumping into the #fractalite channel in the Fractal community Slack to discuss. Feel free to message @mark with any questions you might have!


🚦 Features & status

This prototype is in the very early 'developer preview' stages and is currently focussed on development direction alongside plugin and adapter APIs.

Feedback, comments and/or pull requests on all aspects of the prototype are however always welcome!

Currently implemented

  • Middleware-based components parser/compiler
  • Plugin system for compiler and UI customisation
  • Adapter-based component rendering
  • Completely customisable nav generation
  • Component and scenario search
  • Easy asset referencing within components
  • Dynamic page builder
  • Zero-config asset bundling (via plugin)
  • Hybrid client/server side-rendered UI (using Vue)
  • Live-reloading development mode
  • Static build export

Still missing/in progress

  • Proper UI design & implementation
    • Responsive UI
    • Cross-browser tested
    • Loading states
    • More variables for theming
    • Proper landing page
  • More tests
  • Documentation
  • Additional template engine adapters
    • Handlebars
    • Twig
    • React
    • Others...?
  • More UI customisation hooks?
  • More extensive feature demo
  • Any other suggestions...?

πŸ“Ί Demo

The most full-featured demo is the Nunjucks demo. It uses the Nunjucks adapter alongside the Asset Bundler and Notes plugins.

The source code for the Nunjucks demo contains commented examples of some of the main features of this prototype and is worth investigating in conjunction with the web UI.

Screenshot of the Nunjucks demo

Running the demo

  1. Download or clone this repo
  2. npm install - install top-level dependencies
  3. npm run bootstrap: bootstrap packages together (may take some time on first run!)

πŸ›  Development mode

  1. npm run demo - Start the development server
  2. View the app: http://localhost:3030.

Changes to the Nunjucks components will be instantly reflected in the UI.

πŸ“¦ Static build mode

  1. npm run demo:build - Export flat-file version of the app & serve the dist directory
  2. View the static app: http://localhost:4040

Exported files can be found in the demos/nunjucks/build directory after export.

As the name suggests, the static build is not regenerated when component files are updated.

A hosted version of the static build can be found here

Other demos

  • Vue demo - Basic proof-of-concept, client-side rendered Vue integration. npm run demo:vue

πŸ“š Documentation

Below is some preliminary documentation to help get across some of the key aspects of the Fractalite prototype.

This documentation assumes good knowledge of Fractal (v1) concepts and is not intended as a starter guide!

Installation

Note: Fractalite is not currently published to NPM. The following steps are for information purposes only until published.

Install via NPM:

npm i @frctl/fractalite --save-dev

Add the following NPM scripts to the project package.json file:

{
  "scripts": {
    "start": "fractalite start --port 3333",
    "build": "fractalite build"
  }
}

You can now start the Fractalite app by running the npm start command from within the project directory.

Project Configuration

Fractalite config is kept in a fractal.config.js file in the project root directory. Only the components property is required.

// fractal.config.js
const { resolve } = require('path');

module.exports = {
  // absolute path to the components directory
  components: resolve(__dirname, './src/components'),
};

The Nunjucks demo contains a annotated example of a project configuration file that contains more detail on the available options.

Components

Each Fractalite component is a directory containing one or more files.

In order for Fractalite to correctly identify a directory as a component, it must include at least one of the following:

  • A view file with a name matching view.* or *.view.* (i.e. view.html or button.view.njk)
  • A config file with a name matching config.* or *.config.* (i.e. config.yml or button.config.js)
  • A package.json file

A component directory can then also include any number of other related files and folders as required.

The file structure for a basic Nunjucks button component might look something like this:

button
β”œβ”€β”€ button.config.js
β”œβ”€β”€ button.css
└── view.njk

Scenarios

Component scenarios are a key concept in Fractalite.

A scenario provides an example implementation of the component by supplying a set of properties to render the component with.

Scenarios are very similar to the concept of variants in Fractal v1, but refined and renamed to better suit the way in which v1 variants have been used in practice. They can also be thought of as similar to the 'story' concept in StorybookJS.

For example, a common use for a button component might be as a 'next' control. A simple scenario object representing that might look as follows:

{
  name: 'next', // reference name
  label: 'Next step', // display in UI navigation
  props: {
    text: 'Go Next',
    icon: './arrow-right.png'
  }  
}

props are similar to the context object in Fractal v1

Scenarios are defined in the component config file. The Fractalite UI creates a component preview for each scenario defined for that component.

Any relative paths to assets in the scenario props object are resolved to full URLs before rendering.

Rendering multiple scenario instances per preview

Sometimes you may want to render multiple instances of the same scenario in one preview window - say for example to test the next button scenario with labels of differing lengths:

Multiple buttons in a preview

To support this, each scenario can define a preview property as an array of props. Each item in this array will be merged with the default scenario props, and the preview will render one instance for each set of merged props.

{
  name: 'next',
  props: {
    text: 'Go Next',
    icon: './arrow-right.png'
  },
  preview: [
    {
      label: 'Next'
    },
    {
      label: 'Next button with a long label that might wrap'
    }
  ]
}

The preview for this scenario will have two buttons in it, one for each of the preview items defined.

See the Previews section for details on how to customise the preview markup.

Adapter integration

Template engine adapters such as the Nunjucks adapter support including sub-components with scenario properties provided as their default property values:

{% component 'button' %} <!-- include `button` component with no props -->
{% component 'button/next' %}  <!-- include `button` component with props from `next` scenario -->
{% component 'button/next', { text: 'Forwards' } %}  <!-- include `button` component with props from `next` scenario merged with inline props -->

Configuration

Component config files can be JSON, YAML or CommonJS module format, although the latter is recommended for flexibility.

Config files must be named config.{ext} or {component-name}.config.{ext} - for example button.config.js or config.yml.

CommonJS formatted files should export a configuration object:

// button/button.config.js
module.exports = {
  label: 'A basic button',
  // other config here...
};

Config properties

See the demo button component for an annotated example of some of the available config options.

label [string]

The text that should be used to refer to the component in the UI. [Defaults to a title-cased version of the component name.]

scenarios [array]

An array of scenario objects.

// button/button.config.js
module.exports = {
  scenarios: [
    {
      name: 'next',
      props: {
        text: 'Go Next',
        icon: './arrow-right.png'
      }  
    },
    {
      name: 'prev',
      props: {
        text: 'Go Prev',
        icon: './arrow-left.png'
      }  
    }
  ]
}

View templates

View templates are template-engine specific files that contain the code required to render the component.

Fractalite adapters are responsible for determining how view templates are named, rendered and for any other framework/engine related integration details.

However, in the case of 'simple' template engines such as Nunjucks or Handlebars, views are typically templated fragments of HTML as in the following (Nunjucks) example:

<!-- button/view.njk -->
<a class="button" href="{{ href }}">
  <span class="button__text">{{ text }}</span>
</a>

More complex frameworks such as Vue or React may have different requirements and feature support will be determined by the adapter used.

Linking to assets in view templates

Referencing local component assets in view templates can be done via relative paths:

button
β”œβ”€β”€ next-arrow.png
└── view.njk
<!-- view.njk -->
<img src="./next-arrow.png">

Any relative paths in html attributes that expect a URL value will be dynamically rewritten to reference the asset correctly.

Previews

Rendered component instances are wrapped in an HTML document for previewing.

A typical project will need to be configured to inject the required styles and scripts into the preview to correctly display the component.

Adding CSS & JS to previews

The assets bundler plugin automatically injects bundled assets into previews so this step may not be needed if using it in your project.

The preview option in the project config file lets you specify scripts and stylesheets to be injected into to all component previews.

// fractal.config.js
const { resolve } = require('path');

module.exports = {
  // ...
  preview: {
    /*
     * Assets can be specified as either:
     *
     * 1) an absolute path to the file
     * 2) an external URL
     * 3) or an object with 'url' and 'path' keys
     */
    stylesheets: [
      resolve(__dirname, './dist/styles.css'), // (1)
      'http://example.com/external-styles.css', // (2)
      {
        url: '/custom/url/path.css',
        path: resolve(__dirname, './dist/yet-more-styles.css')
      } // (3)
    ],
    scripts: [
      // scripts can be added in the same way as stylesheets
    ]
  }
};

Individual components can also add local CSS/JS files from within their directory using relative paths:

button
β”œβ”€β”€ preview.css
└── view.njk
// button/button.config.js
module.exports = {
  preview: [
    stylesheets: ['./preview.css'],
    scripts: [/* ... */],
  ]
}

It's also possible to add 'inline' JS/CSS code to the previews using the preview.css and preview.js config options. See the Nunjucks demo button component config for an annotated example of this in action.

Customising preview markup

As well as adding assets, Fractalite also exposes a number of ways to completely customise the preview markup and output:

  • Each individually rendered scenario instance can be wrapped in custom HTML using the preview.wrapEach option (available both globally and on a component-by-component basis)
  • Each set of scenario instances can be wrapped in custom html using the preview.wrap option (available both globally and on a component-by-component basis)
  • The entire preview document template can also be completely overridden if required (only available as a global option)

Component-level customisation

// button/button.config.js
module.exports = {

  preview: {

    // add an in-preview title
    wrap(html, ctx) {
      return `
        <h4>${ctx.component.label} / ${ctx.scenario.label}</h4>
        ${html}`;
    },

    // wrap each item in the preview to space them out
    wrapEach(html, ctx) {
      return `<div style="margin-bottom: 20px">${html}</div>`;
    }
  }
}

Bespoke preview templates

Custom preview template markup can be provided by using the preview.template config option.

Note that preview templates are rendered using Nunjucks. The default preview template can be found here for reference.

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  preview: {
    template: `
    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <head>
      {% for url in stylesheets %}<link rel="stylesheet" href="{{ url }}">{% endfor %}
      {% if css %}<style>{{ css | safe }}</style>{% endif %}
      <title>{{ meta.title | default('Preview') }}</title>
    </head>
    <body>
      <div id="app">
        <h1>A custom preview</h1>
        <div class="wrapper">
          {{ content | safe }}
        </div>
      </div>
      {% for url in scripts %}<script src="{{ url }}"></script>{% endfor %}
      {% if js %}<script>{{ js | safe }}</script>{% endif %}
    </body>
    </html>
    `
  }
};

For even more control over the preview rendering process it is also possible to provide a function instead of a string as the preview.template value.

This allows you to use any template engine you like for the preview rendering (or none at all!).

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  preview: {
    template: function(content, opts){
      /*
       * The return value of the function should be the
       * fully rendered preview template string.
       *
       * Any stylesheets, scripts etc that have been
       * added in global or component config are available
       * in the `opts` object.
       */
      return `
      <html>
        <head>
          <!-- add stylesheets, meta etc -->
        </head>
        <body>${content}</body>
        <!-- add scripts etc -->
      </html>`;
    }
  }
};

Pages

Each project can specify a directory of pages to be displayed in the app.

Pages can either be Markdown documents (with a .md extension) or Nunjucks templates (with a .njk extension) and can define Jekyll-style front matter blocks for configuration options.

Usage

Add the absolute path to the pages directory to the project config file:

// fractal.config.js
const { resolve } = require('path');
module.exports = {
  // ...
  pages: resolve(__dirname, './pages'), // absolute path to the pages directory
};

Then create the pages:

./pages
β”œβ”€β”€ about.njk
└── index.md

If an index file (either with .md or .njk extension) is added in the root of the pages directory then this will override the default application welcome page.

Reference tags

Reference tags can be used in pages to make linking to other pages, component previews and source files both easier and less fragile. They also allow basic access to properties of page and component objects.

Reference tags take the form {target:identifier:property}.

  • target: one of component, page, file, inspect or preview
  • identifier: unique identifier for the target - for example the component name or page handle
  • property: optional, defaults to url

Some example reference tags:

 <!-- button component inspector URL -->
{inspect:button}

 <!-- standalone preview URL for button component with 'next scenario' -->
{preview:button/next}

 <!-- URL of raw source of the button view template -->
{file:button/view.njk}

<!-- URL of the about page -->
{page:about}

<!-- title of the about page -->
{page:about:title}

Nunjucks templates

Nunjucks templates (pages with a .njk extension) have access to the current compiler state properties as well as any data provided in the front matter block:

<!-- about.njk -->
<p>The following components are available</p>
<ul>
  {% for component in components %}
  <li><a href="{{ component.url }}">{{ component.label }}</a></li>
  {% endfor %}  
</ul>

Front Matter

The following page configuration options are available and can be set in a front matter block at the top of pages that require it.

title [string]

The title displayed at the top of the page.

label [string]

Used to refer to the page in any navigation

handle [string]

Used in reference tags to refer to the page. Defaults to the page URL with slashes replaced by dashes.

markdown [boolean]

Whether or not to run the page contents through the markdown renderer. [Defaults to true for .md pages, false for all others.]

template [boolean]

Whether or not to run the page contents through the Nunjucks renderer. [Defaults to true for .njk pages, false for all others.]

Application UI

Many aspects of the Fractalite UI can be configured, customised or overridden.

Navigation

The sidebar navigation contents can be customised in the project fractal.config.js config file using the nav.items property.

The value of this property can either be an array of navigation items or a generator function that returns an array of items.

Each item in the nav array should either be an object with the following properties:

  • label: Text to be displayed for the nav item
  • url: URL to link to (if children are not specified)
  • children: Array of child navigation items (if url is not specified)

Or it an be a Page, Component or File instance. Component instances will automatically have their scenarios added as child items.

If no value for the nav.items property is supplied then the default nav generator will be used which includes links to all pages and components.

Hard-coding items

Most projects will want to dynamically generate their navigation, however it may occasionally be useful to hard-code the nav for some use cases.

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  nav: {
    items: [
      {
        label: 'Welcome',
        url: '/'
      },
      {
        label: 'Components',
        children: [
          {
            label: 'Next Button',
            url: '/inspect/button/next'
          },
          {
            label: 'Call to Action',
            url: '/inspect/cta/default'
          }
        ]
      },
      {
        label: 'Github',
        url: 'https://github.com/org/project'
      },
    ]
  }
};

Dynamically generating items

A generator function can be supplied instead of hard-coding the items.

The generator will receive the compiler state as its first argument and a toTree utility function as the second argument. The toTree utility can be used to generate a file-system based tree from a flat array of components or files.

The generator function should return an array of navigation items in the same format as the hard-coded example above.

The example below shows components can be filtered before generating the navigation:

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  nav: {
    items(state, toTree){
      // filter components by some custom property in the config
      const components = state.components.filter(component => {
        return component.config.customProp === true;
      });
      // return the navigation tree
      return [
        {
          label: 'Components',
          children: components // flat list of filtered components
        },
        {
          label: 'Pages',
          children: toTree(state.pages) // tree of pages
        }
      ];
    }
  }
};

Theming

Fractalite offers a number of options for customising the look and feel of the UI.

Theme variables

Basic colour and style changes can be made by customising the available theme variables in the global config file:

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  theme: {
    vars: {
      'sidebar-bg-color': 'red'
    }
  }
};

Custom CSS & JS

More complex needs can be met by adding custom stylesheets, scripts or 'inline' CSS/JS to override the default theme:

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  theme: {
    stylesheets: [
      {
        url: '/custom/url/path.css',
        path: resolve(__dirname, './dist/styles.css')
      }
    ],
    scripts: [/* ... */],
    css:`
      body {
        background: pink;
      }
    `,
    js: `
      console.log(window.location);
    `
  }
};

Template overrides

It is also possible to override some or all of the templates used in generating the UI by specifiying a custom views directory:

// fractal.config.js
const { resolve } = require('path');

module.exports = {
  // ...
  theme: {
    views: resolve(__dirname, './custom-theme-views') // path to views directory
  }
};

Any files placed within this custom views directory will override their equivalents in the application views directory.

custom-theme-views
└── partials
    └── brand.njk // override sidebar branding template

Theme modules

Themes can also be provided as modules. In this case the module will receive the app instance and should return a set of theme config values:

// ./custom-theme.js
module.exports = function(app){
  // Can customise app instance here...
  return {
    // ...and return any theme config opts here
    vars: {
      'tabs-highlight-color--active': 'pink'
    }
  }
}
// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...
  theme: require('./custom-theme.js')
};

Plugins

Plugins the primary way that the Fractalite app can be customised, and can affect both the UI and the component parsing/compilation process.

Plugins are added in the project config file:

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  plugins: [
    require('./plugins/example')({
      // customisation opts here
    })
  ]
};

A plugin is a function that receives app, compiler and renderer instances as it's arguments.

A useful pattern is to wrap the plugin function itself in a 'parent' function so that it can receive runtime options:

// plugins/example.js
module.exports = function(opts = {}){
  // any plugin initialiation here
  return function(app, compiler, renderer){
    // this is the plugin function itself
    console.log('This is an example plugin');
  }
};

Example plugin - author info

The following is an example of a fairly basic plugin that reads author information from component config files and adds a tab to the component inspector UI to display this information.

// plugins/author-info.js
module.exports = function(opts = {}) {
  return function authorPlugin(app, compiler) {

    const authorDefaults = {
      name: 'Unknown Author',
      email: null
    };

    /*
     * First add a compiler middleware function
     * to extract author info from the component config
     * and create a .author property on the component
     * object with a normalized set of properties.
     */
    compiler.use(components => {
      components.forEach(component => {
        const authorConfig = component.config.author || {};
        component.author = { ...authorDefaults, ...authorConfig };
      });
    });

    /*
     * Then add an inspector panel to display the
     * author information in the UI. The panel templates
     * are rendered using Nunjucks and have access to the
     * current component, scenario and compiler state.
     */
    app.addInspectorPanel({
      name: 'component-author',
      label: 'Author Info',
      template: `
         <div class="author-panel">
           <h3>Author information</h3>
           <ul>
             <li><strong>Name:</strong> {{ component.author.name }}</li>
             {% if component.author.email %}
             <li><strong>Email:</strong> {{ component.author.email }}</li>
             {% endif %}
           </ul>
         </div>
       `,
       css: `
        .author-panel {
          padding: 20px;
        }
        .author-panel ul {
          margin-top: 20px;
        }
      `
    });
  };
};

Author information can then be added to component config files and will be displayed in the UI:

// button/button.config.js
module.exports = {
  author: {
    name: "Daffy Duck",
    email: 'daffy@duck.com'
  }
}

Note that in the simple example above the compiler middleware could have been skipped in favour of a little more verbosity in the template. In more complex real-world examples however this is not always the case.

Assets bundler plugin

The asset bundler plugin uses Parcel to provide a zero-config asset bundling solution for Fractalite.

It handles asset compilation, hot module reloading (HMR) and automatically adds all generated assets into Fractalite component previews.

First add it to the project config file:

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...  
  plugins: [
    require('@frctl/fractalite-plugin-assets-bundler')({
      entryFile: './src/preview.js',
      outFile: './dist/build.js'
    })
  ]
};

Then create the global entry file to bundle the required assets as per your project requirements. An example might look like this:

// ./assets/preview.js
import '../components/**/*.scss'
import button from '../components/button/button.js'

See the Parcel docs on module resolution for more info on paths, globbing and aliases: https://parceljs.org/module_resolution.html

Dynamic entry file building

The asset bundler also support dynamic creation of the entry file using the entryBuilder config option.

The entry builder will be re-run whenever changes are made to the components directory.

const { relative } = require('path');

const bundlerPlugin = require('@frctl/fractalite-plugin-assets-bundler')({

  /*
   * The entryBuilder function receives state and context
   * objects and should return a string of the entry file contents.
   *
   * This example dynamically build an entry file that imports all
   * css files from components.
   */
  entryBuilder(state, ctx) {
    let entry = '';
    state.files.filter(f => f.ext === '.scss').forEach(file => {
      entry += `import '${relative(ctx.dir, file.path)}'\n`; // import paths need to be relative to the ctx.dir property
    });
    return entry;
  },

  // entry and out files must still be specified
  entryFile: './src/preview.js',
  outFile: './dist/build.js'
})

Notes plugin

The notes plugin adds a inspector panel to display component notes.

Notes can be defined via the notes property in the component config file, or alternatively kept in a markdown file in the component directory.

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ...  
  plugins: [
    require('@frctl/fractalite-plugin-notes')({
      notesFile: 'notes.md' // optional, only if notes should be read from files
    })
  ]
};

Adapters

Adapters allow Fractalite to support many different template engines and frameworks.

Fractalite currently supports a single adapter per project. Adapters are specified in the project configuration file:

// fractal.config.js
module.exports = {
  adapter: require('./example-adapter.js')({
    // customisation opts here
  })
};

All adapters must provide a render function which receives a component, a set of props, and a state object and returns a string representing the rendered component.

Adapters also have access to both the compiler and the app instances so can also perform much more complicated integration with the application if required.

Structure of an adapter

An adapter is a function that receives app and compiler instances as it's arguments, and must return a render function or an adapter object that includes a render function amongst its properties.

As with plugins, a useful pattern is to wrap the adapter function itself in a 'parent' function so that it can receive runtime options:

// example-adapter.js
module.exports = function(opts = {}){
  // any adapter initialiation here
  return function(app, compiler){
    // do anything with app/compiler here
    return function render(component, props, state){
      // do rendering here...
      return html;
    }
  }
};

Render functions can be asynchronous - just return a Promise that resolves to the HTML string.

Example adapter - Mustache

The following example is for a basic adapter for Mustache templates. To keep it simple it does not include support for partials.

const Mustache = require('mustache');

module.exports = function(opts = {}) {
  /*
   * Allow users to override the default view name
   */
  const viewName = opts.viewName || 'view.mustache';

  return function mustacheAdapter() {
    /*
     * Asynchronous render function.
     *
     * Looks for a matching view file in the list of component files,
     * reads it's contents and then renders the string using the
     * Mustache.render method.
     */
    return async function render(component, props) {
      const tpl = component.files.find(file => file.basename === viewName);
      if (!tpl) {
        throw new Error(`Cannot render component - no view file found.`);
      }
      const tplContents = await tpl.getContents();
      return Mustache.render(tplContents, props);
    };
  };
};

API

Compiler

compiler.use(fn)

Push a compiler middleware function onto the stack.

Middleware receive the components array as the first argument, and a Koa-style next function as the second argument.

Middleware can mutate the contents of the components array as needed. Asynchronous middleware is supported.

Unlike in Koa middleware the next function only needs to be called if the middleware should wait for latter middleware to complete before running.

// 'plain' middleware, no awaiting
compiler.use(components => {
  components.forEach(component => {
    // ...
  })
})

// 'asynchronous' middleware
compiler.use(async components => {
  await theAsyncTask();
  components.forEach(component => {
    // ...
  })
})

// middleware that waits for latter middleware to complete first
compiler.use(async (components, next) => {
  await next();
  components.forEach(component => {
    // ...
  })
})

compiler.getState()

Returns an object representing the current state of the compiler. By default this includes components and files properties.

const state = compiler.getState();

state.components.forEach(component => {
  console.log(component.name);
});

state.files.forEach(component => {
  console.log(component.path);
});

compiler.parse()

Re-parse the component directory and update the internal compiler state. Returns a Promise that resolves to a state object.

Application

Properties

app.mode

app.router

app.views

UI

app.addInspectorPanel(props)

app.getInspectorPanels()

app.removeInspectorPanel(name)

Previews

app.addPreviewStylesheet(url, [path])

app.addPreviewScript(url, [path])

app.addPreviewCSS(css)

app.addPreviewJS(js)

app.beforeScenarioRender(fn)

app.afterScenarioRender(fn)

app.beforePreviewRender(fn)

app.afterPreviewRender(fn)

app.addPreviewWrapper(fn, wrapEach)

Routing

app.addRoute(name, path, handler)

app.url(name, params)

Lifecycle

app.beforeStart(fn)

app.on(event, handler)

app.emit(event, [...args])

Views

app.addViewPath(path)

app.addViewExtension(name, ext)

app.addViewFilter(name, filter)

app.addViewGlobal(name, value)

Assets

app.addStylesheet(url, [path])

app.addScript(url, [path])

app.addCSS(css)

app.addJS(js)

app.addStaticDir(name, path, [mount])

app.serveFile(url, path)

Utils

app.utils.renderMarkdown(str)

app.utils.highlightCode(code)

app.utils.parseFrontMatter(str)

app.utils.renderPage(str, [props], [opts])

app.utils.addReferenceLookup(key, handler)

Other

app.extend(methods)

Renderer

renderer.render(component, props)

renderer.renderAll(component, arrayOfProps)

Component

Properties

component.name

component.label

component.config

component.files

component.scenarios

component.isComponent

component.root

component.path

component.relative

component.url

component.previewUrl

Methods

component.matchFiles(matcher)

Page

Properties

page.label

page.title

page.position

page.url

page.isPage

Methods

page.getContents()

File

Properties

file.name

file.path

file.relative

file.basename

file.dirname

file.extname

file.ext

file.stem

file.stats

file.size

file.url

file.isFile

Methods

file.setContents(str)

file.getContents()

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