Automatically log events like executed lines, methods, class and module definitions, C-language routines, and/or raises in Ruby.
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README.md

Autolog

Before you start: a similar tool is now available in Ruby 2.0 called TracePoint (originally a separate project). You could also just use set_trace_func directly. Tracer might be a good option if you want to see each line as it executes. And, a tree-formatted output similar to the taw format below is provided also by Unroller.

AutoLog allows you to automatically log and do things with tracing events in Ruby easily. To start tracing, you can do:

autolog

With a block:

autolog do
  # ...
end

With a block outputting method calls and c-calls:

autolog :call, :c_call do
  # ...
end

With a block specifying a different format/proc you can register:

autolog format: :taw do
  # ...
end

Example Output

Default format just outputs literally what set_trace_func makes available, which isn't pretty:

call /path/to/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@my_rails_app/gems/activerecord-3.2.8/lib/active_record/inheritance.rb.61 #<Binding:0x007fc50cf4c080> ActiveRecord::Inheritance::ClassMethods instantiate
call /path/to/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@my_rails_app/gems/activerecord-3.2.8/lib/active_record/model_schema.rb.160 #<Binding:0x007fc50dec48c8> ActiveRecord::ModelSchema::ClassMethods inheritance_column
call /path/to/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@my_rails_app/gems/activerecord-3.2.8/lib/active_record/model_schema.rb.160 #<Binding:0x007fc50dec40d0> ActiveRecord::ModelSchema::ClassMethods inheritance_column
return /path/to/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@my_rails_app/gems/activerecord-3.2.8/lib/active_record/model_schema.rb.166 #<Binding:0x007fc50dec3c20> ActiveRecord::ModelSchema::ClassMethods inheritance_column
return /path/to/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@my_rails_app/gems/activerecord-3.2.8/lib/active_record/model_schema.rb.166 #<Binding:0x007fc50dec39a0> ActiveRecord::ModelSchema::ClassMethods inheritance_column
call /path/to/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@my_rails_app/gems/activerecord-3.2.8/lib/active_record/inheritance.rb.132 #<Binding:0x007fc50dec3720> ActiveRecord::Inheritance::ClassMethods find_sti_class
call /path/to/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p194@my_rails_app/gems/mail-2.4.4/lib/mail/core_extensions/nil.rb.6 #<Binding:0x007fc50dec3388> NilClass blank?

taw's format is more tree-like and easier to read:

c-call Complex.new
 call <Complex#-605829048>.initialize
   c-call 11.0.kind_of?
   c-call 11.0.kind_of?
   c-call -5.0.kind_of?
   c-call -5.0.kind_of?
c-call Complex.new
 call <Complex#-605832038>.initialize
   c-call 2.0.kind_of?
   c-call 2.0.kind_of?
   c-call 13.5.kind_of?
   c-call 13.5.kind_of?

Or, you can use your own format.

Installation

In your Gemfile, add:

gem 'autolog'

Then:

bundle install

Usage

In the main object/IRB, or in any object, call autolog with parameters, e.g.:

# "convenience methods" to have readable names
autolog
autolog :methods
autolog :c_calls
autolog :c_returns
autolog :c_calls_and_returns
autolog :class_starts
autolog :class_ends
autolog :classes
autolog :method_calls
autolog :method_returns
autolog :methods
autolog :lines
autolog :raises
autolog :trace
# log individual events using their usual names from http://apidock.com/ruby/Kernel/set_trace_func
autolog :raise, :c_call 
autolog 'raise', 'c-call'
# note: autolog :event, ... and autolog :events, ... also works
autolog :off

Or call it on Autolog if that is easier:

# "convenience methods" to have readable names
Autolog.c_calls
Autolog.c_returns
Autolog.c_calls_and_returns
Autolog.class_starts
Autolog.class_ends
Autolog.classes
Autolog.method_calls
Autolog.method_returns
Autolog.methods
Autolog.lines
Autolog.raises
Autolog.trace
# log individual events using their usual names from http://apidock.com/ruby/Kernel/set_trace_func
Autolog.event :c_return
Autolog.events 'raise', 'c-call'
Autolog.events :raise, :c_call
Autolog.off

Blocks

Blocks are nice, because they do an ensure to make sure that autolog :off happens.

For example, this will still stop tracing in the end of the block:

autolog do
  raise Exception.new
end

But, this won't:

autolog
raise Exception.new
autolog :off

Although this would:

begin
  autolog
  raise Exception.new
ensure
  autolog :off
end

More examples:

autolog :methods do
  # ...
end


autolog :lines do
  # ...
end


autolog :events, :line, :c_call do
  # ...
end


Autolog.methods do
  # ...
end


Autolog.events :line, :c_call do
  # ...
end

What you can trace

  • Autolog.c_calls - logs 'c-call'
  • Autolog.c_returns - logs 'c-return'
  • Autolog.c_calls_and_returns - logs 'c-call' and 'c-return'
  • Autolog.class_starts - logs 'class'
  • Autolog.class_ends - logs 'end'
  • Autolog.classes - logs 'class' and 'end'
  • Autolog.method_calls - logs 'call'
  • Autolog.method_returns - logs 'return'
  • Autolog.methods - logs 'call' and 'return'
  • Autolog.lines - logs 'line' (logs every Ruby line executed in this context, similar to a hook into Ruby's caller stack that logs/prints/puts all lines)
  • Autolog.raises - logs 'raise'
  • Autolog.events or Autolog.event - logs one or more provided events, converting each to string and substituting '_' with '-', of the supported events in set_trace_func. Calling with no arguments or empty array will log all events.
  • Autolog.trace - logs all events
  • Autolog.off - turns off tracing (calls set_trace_func nil)

Changing the format, Using another logger, collecting stats, etc.

Use the taw format

Use Tomasz Wegrzanowski's (taw's) format:

autolog format: :taw do
  # ...
end

Do a pull request if you have another format or hack you'd like to share!

Overriding the default

You can either just override the default, while still letting Autolog filter by event type before it calls your proc:

Autolog.procedure = lambda {|event, file, line, id, binding, classname| puts "#{event} #{file}.#{line} #{binding} #{classname} #{id}"}

Register proc and then use :using or :format to use a registered proc

:using and :format are equivalent.

Register a proc that autolog will filter automatically by event type, per documentation:

Autolog.filtered_proc :simple, lambda {|event, file, line, id, binding, classname|
  puts "#{classname}.#{id}"
}

or register a proc that autolog will just send into set_trace_func (which means effectively you'd just be using autolog for its ability to have a block and unset set_trace_func at the end of the block, but you also have access to last args from autolog so you can use user-provided args):

Autolog.unfiltered_proc :all_calls_counter, lambda {|event, file, line, id, binding, classname|
  $counts ||= {}
  if Autolog.last_args[0] == event
    $counts[event.to_sym] = $counts[event.to_sym] ? $counts[event.to_sym] + 1 : 1
  end
}

And then the :format and :using options are synonymous. For ease of reading code, using format to specify something that is just formatting the output differently or using for more involved procs:

autolog :calls, using: :simple do
  # ...
end

or

autolog 'call', using: :all_calls_counter do
  # ...
end

Single-context-safe variables available for usage in custom procs

These variables are "safe" as long as more than one autolog context is not being used at the same time. Multiple thread, etc. could be used within the context of the autolog block, etc. but if you have two different autolog calls executing at once sharing the same module class attributes, that would be a problem.

Autolog.level is just a variable that you can use to increment to find place in the call stack:

Autolog.level += 1

It is initialized to 0 on gem load and at the end of each autolog block or when Autolog.off is called.

Autolog.last_args contains the last set of args and options sent into autolog.

Warning

Enabling some of these like lines or trace will significantly slow down execution and may generate a lot of output.

Contributing

It's as easy as forking, making your changes, and submitting a pull request.

License

Copyright (c) 2012 Gary S. Weaver, released under the MIT license.