PyLith is a finite element code for the solution of dynamic and quasi-static tectonic deformation problems.
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
applications
doc
examples
libsrc
m4 @ 41259ed
modulesrc
playpen
pylith
share
templates
tests
tests_auto
travis
unittests
.gitignore
.gitmodules
.jsbeautifyrc
.travis.yml
.zenodo.json
AUTHORS
CHANGES
COPYING
DEPENDENCIES
INSTALL
Makefile.am
NEWS
README.md
check.am
configure.ac
subpackage.am

README.md

PyLith

MIT License DOI

Build status

  • Master: Build Status
  • Maint: Build Status
  • Next: Build Status

Description

PyLith is an open-source finite-element code for dynamic and quasistatic simulations of crustal deformation, primarily earthquakes and volcanoes.

Features

  • Quasi-static (implicit) and dynamic (explicit) time-stepping
  • Cell types include triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra
  • Linear elastic, linear and generalized Maxwell viscoelastic, power-law viscoelastic, and Drucker-Prager elastoplastic materials
  • Infinitesimal and small strain elasticity formulations
  • Fault interfaces using cohesive cells
    • Prescribed slip with multiple, potentially overlapping earthquake ruptures and aseismic creep
    • Spontaneous slip with slip-weakening friction and Dieterich rate- and state-friction fault constitutive models
  • Time-dependent Dirichlet (displacement/velocity) boundary conditions
  • Time-dependent Neumann (traction) boundary conditions
  • Time-dependent point forces
  • Absorbing boundary conditions
  • Gravitational body forces
  • VTK and HDF5/Xdmf output of solution, fault information, and state variables
  • Templates for adding your own bulk rheologies, fault constitutive models, and interfacing with a custom seismic velocity model.
  • User-friendly computation of static 3-D Green's functions

Release Notes

See CHANGES for a complete list of changes for each release.

Authors

  • Brad Aagaard, Earthquake Science Center, USGS, USA
  • Matthew Knepley, Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, USA
  • Charles Williams, Tectonophysics, GNS Science, New Zealand