Skip to content

Latest commit

 

History

History
292 lines (192 loc) · 10.2 KB

command-execution-rules.rst

File metadata and controls

292 lines (192 loc) · 10.2 KB

Command Execution Rules

Rule Structure

Rules help Gort to determine who is able to perform what task. Gort rules follow a specific format. The rule structure describes what command is executed and what permission is needed in order to execute the command. If a user does not have the specified permission, the user is not able to execute the command.

The general form of a command is:

COMMAND [when CONDITIONS] [allow|must have PERMISSION]
  • Command: The command indicates the command that's affected by the rule. Commands are referred to as bundle_name:command_name. For example, the splitecho command in the echo bundle would be referenced as echo:splitecho.
  • Conditions: The (optional) conditions clause indicates when the rule should be is applied. It starts with the keyword when, and consists of one or more logical statements. See below for more detail. If a rule contains no conditions, it always applies when the command is used.
  • Permissions: The permissions clause indicates the permissions that a user must have to execute the command when the conditions are met. It begins with the phrase must have. Like commands, permissions are namespaced: bundle_name:permission_name.
  • Allow: The standard permissions clause may be replaced with the allow keyword, which can be used to allow a command meeting the rule conditions to be executed by any Gort user. allow is used in lieu of a permissions clause, and may not be accompanied with any other keyword or phrase.

A basic example of a rule is:

foo:bar with option[delete] == true must have foo:destroy

This rule states that a user attempting to use the bar command from the foo bundle, with the delete flag set, must have the foo:destroy permission.

Rules can also be used to grant broad permissions by using the allow keyword:

foo:biz allow

This is the simplest possible rule, which allows any user to use the foo:biz command under all conditions.

The Conditions Clause

The conditions rule clause begins with the keyword with.

The conditions clause can match specific command parameter, allowing you to create rules that apply under very specific invocations of a command.

Options and Arguments

Any command can have two kinds of command parameters: options, are a general term for command flags and switches, and arguments, which are the main inputs into the command.

For example, given the following command:

curl -I --capath /home http://example.com

The options are -I and --capath /home, and the parameter is http://example.com

Testing Options and Arguments

Each rule can reference two pre-defined two data structures: option and arg.

  • option: A map or dict of the commands options. The value of specific options can be accessed using standard map notation.
  • arg: A (zero-indexed) list of the command arguments. Specific arguments can be accessed using standard map notation.

Logical Operators

Individual (non-collection) values can logically evaluated using the <, >, == and != operators:

  • with option["dry-run"] == true

Regular expressions may also be used.

  • with option["set"] == /.*/

Not only can specific arg positions be referenced by index, the entire parameter list can also be evaluated as a string by omitting the index. For example, given the following command:

echo foo bar

The following statements are equivalent:

  • foo:bar with arg[0] == 'foo' and arg[1] == 'bar' allow
  • foo:bar with arg == 'foo bar' allow

Sets

Options and arguments can be tested against sets of conditions by using one of the following keywords:

  • in -- Applied to a non-collection value, resolves to true if and only if the value matches a value in the set.
  • any, in -- Applied to a collection value, resolves to true if and only if any value in the collection matches a value in the set.
  • all, in-- Applied to a collection value, resolves to true if and only if all value in the collection match a value in the set.

Conditional sets can include zero or more values between square brackets. Regular expressions are also legal members and will be evaluated accordingly. Some examples are:

  • foo:bar with arg[0] in ['baz', false, 100] must have foo:read
  • foo:bar with option["foo"] in ["foo", "bar"] allow
  • foo:bar with any option == /^prod.*/ must have foo:read
  • foo:bar with any arg in ['wubba'] must have foo:read
  • foo:bar with any arg in ['wubba', /^f.*/, 10] must have foo:read
  • foo:bar with all arg in [10, 'baz', 'wubba'] must have foo:read
  • foo:bar with all option < 10 must have foo:read
  • foo:bar with all option in ['staging', 'list'] must have foo:read

Combining Qualifiers

Arbitrarily long compound qualifiers can be constructed using the and and/or or keywords, so your rules can be as simple or as complicated as you need them to be. For example, the following rule is legal:

foo:bar with arg=="prod" and option["delete"] == true or option["set"] == /.*/ must have foo:destroy

Permissions

The permissions clause is where you state any permissions that are required to execute the command. The beginning of the permissions clause is indicated by the phrase must have.

Like the conditions clause, it can be arbitrarily complex, and can a single permission, a specific combination of permissions combination, or a list of permissions. It supports the same operations as well:

  • or
  • and
  • any in
  • all in
  • allow

For example, the following are rule examples with valid permission settings:

  • foo:baz with option[delete] == true must have foo:write and site:admin
  • foo:export must have all in [foo:write, site:ops] or any in [site:admin, site:management]
  • foo:bar must have any in [foo:read, foo:write]
  • foo:qux must have all in [foo:write, site:ops] and any in [site:admin, site:management]
  • foo:biz allow

Note the special allow keyword, which can be used in lieu of a permissions clause to allow a command to be executed by any registered user in Gort.

Formal Definition

Gort's command execution rule syntax may seem quite English-like, but it's actually a well-structured syntax describable as a formal context-free grammar.

For your reference, we have included the notation for Gort's command execution using Backus–Naur form, a metasyntax notation for context-free grammars that's often used to describe the syntax of computing languages used in computing.

<rule>              ::= <arguments> " " <permissions> | <permissions> ;

<arguments>         ::= "with " <argument> ;

<argument>          ::= <argument_part> | <argument_part> " " <conditional> " " <argument> ;

<argument_part>     ::= <argument_single> | <argument_plural> ;

<argument_single>   ::= <variable_single> " " <operator> " " <variable_single> ;

<argument_plural>   ::= "all " <defined_set> " " <operator_set> " " <variable_set> | "any " <defined_set> " " <operator_set> " " <variable_set> ;

<defined_set>       ::= "arg" | "option" ;

<operator_set>      ::= "in" | <operator> ;

<operator>          ::= "==" | "!=" | "<" | "<=" | ">" | ">=" ;

<variable_single>   ::= "arg[" <literal_integer> "]" | "option[" <literal_string> "]" | <literal> ;

<variable_set>      ::= "[" <variable_list> "]" ;

<variable_list>     ::= <variable_single> | <variable_single> "," <variable_set> ;

<conditional>       ::= "and" | "or" ;

<permissions>       ::= "allow" | "must have " <permission>  ;

<permission>        ::= <permission_part> | <permission_part> " " <conditional> " " <permission> ;

<permission_part>   ::= <permission_single> | <permission_plural> ;

<permission_single> ::= <name> ":" <name> ;

<permission_plural> ::= "all in " <permission_set> | "any in " <permission_set> ;

<permission_list>   ::= <permission_single> | <permission_single> ", " <permission_list> ;

<permission_set>    ::= "[" <permission_list> "]" ;

<literal>           ::= <literal_bool> | <literal_string> | <literal_number> | <literal_regex> ;

<literal_bool>      ::= "true" | "false" ;

<literal_string>    ::= '"' <string> '"' | "'" <string> "'" ;

<literal_number>    ::= <literal_integer> | <literal_float> ;

<literal_regex>     ::= "/" <regex> "/" ;

<literal_integer>   ::= <digit>+ ;

<literal_float>     ::= <digit>+ "." <digit>+ ;

<digit>             ::= "0" | "1" | "2" | "3" | "4" | "5" | "6" | "7" | "8" | "9" ;

<letter>            ::= "A" | "B" | "C" | "D" | "E" | "F" | "G" | "H" | "I" | "J" | "K" | "L" | "M" | "N" | "O" | "P" | "Q" | "R" | "S" | "T" | "U" | "V" | "W" | "X" | "Y" | "Z" | "a" | "b" | "c" | "d" | "e" | "f" | "g" | "h" | "i" | "j" | "k" | "l" | "m" | "n" | "o" | "p" | "q" | "r" | "s" | "t" | "u" | "v" | "w" | "x" | "y" | "z" ;

<symbol>            ::=  "|" | " " | "!" | "#" | "$" | "%" | "&" | "(" | ")" | "*" | "+" | "," | "-" | "." | "/" | ":" | ";" | ">" | "=" | "<" | "?" | "@" | "[" | "\" | "]" | "^" | "_" | "`" | "{" | "}" | "~"

<rune>              ::= <letter> | <digit> | <symbol> ;

<string>             ::= <rune>+

<character>         ::= <letter> | <digit> ;

<name>              ::= <character>+ ;

Todo

The following list includes some features that are considering adding to the command execution rules language:

  1. Built-in/standard permissions (especially for Gort administration actions)
  2. Syntax to access user/group/adapter attributes in rule conditions
  3. Built-in support functions in conditions?

If any of these is particularly important to you, or if you have an idea for a feature not listed here, please feel free to create an issue.