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README.md

JDBI-Scala

Some handy classes for making JDBI even nicer to use with Scala

Currently it allows you to:

  • Bind case classes in SQL statements
  • Bind simple scala.Option types to SQL statement arguments
  • Return Options from SQL queries
  • Use function literal syntax when running code in a DB transaction

Examples

Binding Case Classes

import com.gilt.jdbi.BindCaseClass

@SqlUpdate("""
  insert into doo_hickeys (id, label, widget_id)
  values (:dh.id, :dh.label, :dh.widgetId)
""")
def insert(@BindCaseClass("dh") dooHickey: DooHickey

Binding Option types

In application setup code:

import com.gilt.jdbi.args.OptionArgumentFactory
db.registerArgumentFactory(OptionArgumentFactory)

In your DAO:

@SqlUpdate("""
  insert into widgets (label, description)
  values (:label, :desc)
""")
def insert(@Bind("label") label: String, @Bind("desc") desc: Option[String])

Note that since ArgumentFactories are not recursive, your Option must contain a type which is directly compatible with JDBC.

Returning Options from queries

In application setup code:

import com.gilt.jdbi.OptionContainerFactory
db.registerContainerFactory(new OptionContainerFactory)

In your DAO:

@SqlQuery("select * from doo_hickeys where key = :key")
@SingleValueResult(classOf[DooHickey])
def findByKey(@Bind("key") key: String): Option[DooHickey]

Using function literals

import com.gilt.jdbi.Conversions._

db.inTransaction(
  (h: Handle, status: TransactionStatus) => {
    // transactional code
  }
)

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Scala helpers for JDBI

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