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Using the Web interface

The following assumes you have Executed as web/API service. Open your browser and direct it at http://your.host:3000. If all went well, you should see the following welcome page:

Orchestrator screenshot

If this is your first time using orchstrator, then you should begin by teaching it. orchestrator needs to know what replication topologies you have. The web interface provides this via the discover page.

From each replication topology, pick one server (this could be master or replica) and let orchestrator know which hostname & port this server listens on. Orchestrator will recursively drill up and down replication to map the entire topology. This may take a couple minutes, during which orchestrator connects the servers it encounters into sub-topologies and eventually into the final topology.

You may manually enter as many servers as you like (inside or outside the topology). The first time orchestrator investigates, it can only reach those replicas that are currently replicating. So if you know you have some replicas which are temporarily down, you'll need to add them manually, or, if you like to see automation in work, just wait until they're up, at which time orchestrator will automatically find them.

Once orchestrator is familiar with a server, it doesn't care if the server is lagging, not replicating or inaccessible. The server is still part of the topology it was last seen in. There is a timeout for that: if a server is not seen by UnseenInstanceForgetHours hours, it is automaticaaly forgotten (presumed dead). Again, if it suddenly comes back to life, and connects to a known topology, it is automatically re-discovered.

Orchestrator resolves the CNAME of every input it gets, either from the user or from the replication topology itself. This is for avoiding ambiguities or implicit duplicates.

Orchestrator screenshot

Once orchestrator is familiar with a topology, you can view and manipulate it via the cluster page. Click the clusters drop down on navigation bar to see available clusters.

Each topology is associated with a cluster name, which is (currently) named after the topology's master.

The cluster page is where most fun happens. Orchestrator presents the cluster in an easy to follow tree infographic, based on a D3 widget. Sub trees are collapsible.

Each node in the tree presents a single MySQL instance, listing its fully qualified name, its version, binary log format and replication lag.

Orchestrator screenshot

Note that each server has a settings icon to the right. Clicking this icon opens a modal with some extra info on that server as well as operations to be performed.

The modal allows you to begin/terminate maintenance mode on an instance; perform an immediate refresh (by default instances are polled once per minute - this is configurable); stop/start replication; forget the instance (may be rediscovered a minute later if still connected to the topology).

Orchestrator screenshot

The topology can be refactored: replicas can be moved around via drag and drop. Start dragging an instance: all possible droppable targets are immediately colored green. You may turn your instance to be the replica of all droppable targets.

Master-master topologies can be created by dragging a master onto one of its replicas, making both co-masters.

Complex refactoring is done by performing multiple such steps. You may need to drag and drop your instance three or four times to put it in a "remote" location.

Orchestrator will keep you safe by disallowing dropping your instance when either your instance or its target master have problems (lag too much, do not replicate etc.). It may allow the drop and still abort the operation if it finds a deeper block, such as the target not having binary logs.

Begin dragging: possible targets colored green

Orchestrator screenshot

Move over your target and drop:

Orchestrator screenshot

Topology refactored:

Orchestrator screenshot

Dragging a master over its replica makes for a co-masters (master-master) topology:

Orchestrator screenshot

A co-master topology:

Orchestrator screenshot

Orchestrator visually indicates replication & accessibility related problems: replica lag, replication not working, instance not accessed for long time, instance access failure, instance under maintenance.

Orchestrator screenshot

Problems drop down is available on all pages, and indicates all currently known issues across all topologies:

Orchestrator screenshot

The Audit page presents with all actions taken via orchestrator: replica move, detection, maintenance etc. (START SLAVE and STOP SLAVE are currently not audited).

Orchestrator screenshot

Queries -> Long queries page list last met long running queries over the entire topology. these would be queries running over 60 seconds, non-replication, non-event-scheduler.