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README.md

Phosphor: Dynamic Taint Tracking for the JVM

Phosphor is a system for performing dynamic taint analysis in the JVM, on commodity JVMs (e.g. Oracle's HotSpot or OpenJDK's IcedTea). This repository contains the source for Phosphor. For more information about how Phosphor works and what it could be useful for, please refer to our OOPSLA 2014 paper, ISSTA 2015 Tool Demo or email Jonathan Bell. José Cambronero also maintains a series of examples on using Phosphor.

Phosphor has been extensively developed since its original publication, and now includes many features and options not described in the OOPSLA 2014 paper. If you are looking to replicate our OOPSLA 2014 experiments, the easiest way to get the same version with certainty is to use this VM Image with all relevant files here, and to follow the README with instructions for doing so here.

Running

Phosphor works by modifying your application's bytecode to perform data flow tracking. To be complete, Phosphor also modifies the bytecode of JRE-provided classes, too. The first step to using Phosphor is generating an instrumented version of your runtime environment. We have tested Phosphor with Oracle and OpenJDK Java 8 runtimes. Support for newer versions of Java (e.g. 9 and higher) is currently partially implemented, and is expected to be completed by mid-summer 2020 (certainly before Oracle's end of support for Java 8).

The instrumenter takes two primary arguments: first a path containing the classes to instrument, and then a destination for the instrumented classes. You can also specify to track taint tags through control flow, to use objects as tags (instead of integers), or to automatically perform taint marking in particular methods using the various options as shown by invoking Phosphor with the "-help" option.

usage: java -jar phosphor.jar [OPTIONS] [input] [output]
 -controlTrack                  Enable taint tracking through control flow
 -help                          print this message
 -withoutDataTrack              Disable taint tracking through data flow
                                (on by default)

Phosphor now should be configured to correctly run JUnit tests (with taint tracking) in most environments (Mac + Linux + Windows). Running mvn verify should cause Phosphor to generate several different instrumented JRE's (for multitaint use, int-tag taint use, and control track use) into the project's target directory, then run unit tests in that JRE that are automatically tracked. You take a look at the test cases to see some example usage. Tests that end in ObjTagITCase are executed with Phosphor configured for object tags (multi tainting), and ImplicitITCase tests run in the control tracking mode.

We'll assume that in all of the code examples below, we're in the same directory (which has a copy of Phosphor-0.0.5-SNAPSHOT.jar, which you generated by downloading Phosphor, and running mvn package), and that the JRE is located here: /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.8.0_222.jdk/Contents/Home (modify this path in the commands below to match your environment).

Important note on OpenJDK vs Oracle's JDK: Oracle's JVM requires that the jar that contains all of the cryptography routines (jce.jar) be signed by Oracle, for export control purposes. OpenJDK does not. When Phosphor instruments the JVM, it will break these signatures. Hence, it is not possible to use Phosphor with Oracle's JDK and use the cryptography functionality of the JVM without some extra work. The first option is (if you have been granted a signing key by Oracle), you can sign the resulting jar. The more attainable option is to instead use the OpenJDK jce.jar file with your Oracle JVM, which will not have the signature checks, and will work just fine. Alternatively, if this is too complicated (and you need cryptography support), you can just choose to use OpenJDK entirely (which does not have this check).

Then, to instrument the JRE we'll run: java -jar Phosphor-0.0.5-SNAPSHOT.jar /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.8.0_222.jdk/Contents/Home jre-inst

After you do this, make sure to chmod +x the binaries in the new folder, e.g. chmod +x jre-inst/bin/*

The next step is to instrument the code which you would like to track. This time when you run the instrumenter, pass your entire (compiled) code base to Phosphor for instrumentation, and specify an output folder for that.

We can now run the instrumented code using our instrumented JRE, as such: JAVA_HOME=jre-inst/ $JAVA_HOME/bin/java -Xbootclasspath/a:Phosphor-0.0.5-SNAPSHOT.jar -javaagent:Phosphor-0.0.5-SNAPSHOT.jar -cp path-to-instrumented-code your.main.class

Note: It is not 100% necessary to instrument your application/library code in advance - the javaagent will detect any uninstrumented class files as they are being loaded into the JVM and instrument them as necessary. If you want to do this, then you may want to add the flag -javaagent:Phosphor-0.0.5-SNAPSHOT.jar=cacheDir=someCacheFolder and Phosphor will cache the generated files in someCacheFolder so they aren't regenerated every run. If you take a look at the execution of Phosphor's JUnit tests, you'll notice that this is how they are instrumented. It's always necessary to instrument the JRE in advance though for bootstrapping.

New 2/27/19: You can no longer specify auto taint methods (what were sources/sinks/taint through methods) for the static instrumenter. Instead, ALL autotaint instrumentation happens via the java agent (this makes it possible to detect child-classes of auto taint classes). You can specify the files to the java agent using the syntax -javaagent:Phosphor-0.0.4-SNAPSHOT.jar=taintSources={taintSourceFile},taintSinks={taintSinksFile},taintThrough={taintThroughFile}

Interacting with Phosphor

Phosphor exposes a simple API to allow to marking data with tags, and to retrieve those tags. Key functionality is implemented in edu.columbia.cs.psl.phosphor.runtime.MultiTainter. To get or set the taint tag of a primitive type, developers call the taintedX or getTaint(X) method (replacing X with each of the primitive types, e.g. taintedByte, etc.). Ignore the methods ending with the suffix $$PHOSPHOR, they are used internally. To get or set the taint tag of an object, first cast that object to the interface TaintedWithObjTag (Phosphor changes all classes to implement this interface), and use the get and set methods.

You can determine if a variable is derived from a particular tainted source by examining the labels on that variable's Taint object.

You can detaint variables with Phosphor - to do so, simply use the MultiTainter interface to set the taint on a value to 0 (or null).

Building

Phosphor is a maven project. You can generate the jar with a simple mvn package. You can run the tests with mvn verify (which also generates the jar). Phosphor requires Java 8. If you are making changes to Phosphor and running the tests, you will want to make sure that Phosphor regenerates the instrumented JRE between test runs (because you are changing the instrumentation process). To do so, simply do mvn clean verify instead. If you would like to develop Phosphor in eclipse, use mvn eclipse:eclipse to generate eclipse project files, then import the project into Eclipse.

Notes on control tracking

Please note that the control tracking functionality can impose SIGNIFICANT overhead (we've observed > 10x slowdown) depending on the structure of the code you are instrumenting and the amount of tainted data flowing around. This is incredibly un-optimized at this point. This also can make it difficult to apply Phosphor with control tracking to very large methods (since it causes them to grow beyond the maximum size permitted). Nonetheless, we have had great success applying it in various projects --- it works fine on the JDK (perhaps a few internal classes will be too large, but they were not needed in our workloads) and on projects like Tomcat. There are quite a few paths to improving this functionality. If you are interested in helping, please contact us.

Questions, concerns, comments

Please email Jonathan Bell with any feedback. This project is still under heavy development, and we are working on many extensions, and would very much welcome any feedback.

License

This software is released under the MIT license.

Copyright (c) 2013, by The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York.

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Acknowledgements

This project makes use of the following libraries:

Phosphor's performance tuning is made possible by JProfiler, the java profiler.

The authors of this software are Katherine Hough, Jonathan Bell and Gail Kaiser. Jonathan Bell and Katherine Hough are funded in part by NSF CCF-1763822 and CCF-1844880. Gail Kaiser directs the Programming Systems Laboratory, funded in part by NSF CCF-1161079, NSF CNS-0905246, and NIH U54 CA121852.

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