Skip to content
GNES Hub ship AI/ML models as Docker containers and use Docker containers as plugins.
Python Dockerfile
Branch: master
Clone or download
numb3r3 Merge pull request #21 from gnes-ai/clean-hub
refactor(preprocessor): remove shot-detector and video-encoder
Latest commit bc81276 Sep 16, 2019
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
.github docs: add tutorial Aug 20, 2019
encoder add lab model Sep 11, 2019
indexer add readonly for leveldb image to avoid dump in query Sep 11, 2019
preprocessor add video preprocessor Sep 16, 2019
router doc: fix import path Aug 21, 2019
tutorial doc: fix import path Aug 22, 2019
.gitignore docs: add tutorial Aug 19, 2019
LICENSE docs: add tutorial Aug 20, 2019
README.md doc: fix import path Aug 22, 2019

README.md

GNES Hub, logo made by Han Xiao

"Model as docker, docker as plugin"

PyPI - License

HighlightsOverviewTutorialContributingBlog

GNES Hub ship AI/ML models as Docker containers and use Docker containers as plugins. It offers a clean and sustainable way to port external algorithms (with the dependencies) into the GNES framework.

GNES Hub is hosted on the Docker Hub.

GNES Hub, logo made by Han Xiao

🌟 Highlights

  • X-as-service: it immediately grants cloud-nativeness and elasticity to any model, making them GNES-ready.
  • Full autonomy: model developers have the complete autonomy on what to install and to include for running the algorithms.
  • Simple interface: simply override few methods and concentrate on the core logic of the algorithm.
  • Good for all: enjoy the state-of-the-art models without worrying about dependencies, data files, drivers, versionings, virtual envs etc.

📒 Interested readers are recommended to read the long version.

Structure of the repository

Name Description
preprocessor transforming a real-world object to a list of workable semantic units
encoder representing a semantic unit with vector representation
indexer storing the vectors into memory/disk that allows fast-access
router forwarding messages between microservices: e.g. batching, mapping, reducing

A GNES Hub model is represented by at least three files: Dockerfile, model.py and model.yml. They should be put in the same folder and placed under one of the aforementioned folders, say indexer/my-awesome-indexer/. The corresponding Docker Hub image is gnes/hub-indexer:my-awesome-indexer, which is built and pushed to Docker Hub automatically on every master update.

Tutorial

Porting PyTorch-Transformers into GNES

In this section, I will show you how to port PyTorch-Transformers (a library of state-of-the-art pre-trained models) into GNES. It will help you understand the design of model management in GNES, i.e. model as docker, docker as a plugin.

💡 Key idea: We build a new encoder by inheriting gnes.encoder.base.BaseTextEncoder and implementing its encode, init and dump methods. No need to worry about networks, microservices etc., as they have been abstracted away at this layer.

The files needed are listed below:

Name Description
transformer.py A Python module that implements the encoder interface using PyTorch-Transformers
transformer.yml A YAML config that describes the parameters and arguments of the encoder
Dockerfile Dockerfile that wraps dependencies, model data, etc. into an image

Breakdown of transformer.py

In tutorial/transformer.py, I make a new class called PyTorchTransformers inherited from BaseTextEncoder, then implement __init__, post_init, __getstate__ and encode methods.

Implement __init__ method

For demonstration, the init method is made as simple as possible: it accepts a string-type argument model_name allowing one to choose pretrained models.

from gnes.encoder.base import BaseTextEncoder

class PyTorchTransformers(BaseTextEncoder):

    def __init__(self, model_name: str = 'bert-base-uncased', *args, **kwargs):
        super().__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.model_name = model_name
Implement post_init method

To load the pretrained model and tokenizer from the data files/web, we need to override the post_init method. Here I basically copy-paste the example shown in Quick Tour of Pytorch-Transformers.

class PyTorchTransformers(BaseTextEncoder):
    # ...
    
    def post_init(self):
        from pytorch_transformers import *
        
        # select the model, tokenizer & weight accordingly
        model_class, tokenizer_class, pretrained_weights = \
            {k[-1]: k for k in
             [(BertModel, BertTokenizer, 'bert-base-uncased'),
              # ...
              (RobertaModel, RobertaTokenizer, 'roberta-base')]}[self.model_name]
    
        def load_model_tokenizer(x):
            return model_class.from_pretrained(x), tokenizer_class.from_pretrained(x)
    
        try:
            self.model, self.tokenizer = load_model_tokenizer(self.work_dir)
        except Exception:
            self.logger.warning('cannot deserialize model/tokenizer from %s, will download from web' % self.work_dir)
            self.model, self.tokenizer = load_model_tokenizer(pretrained_weights)

What's the difference between __init__ and post_init methods? Roughly speaking, __init__ is the standard Python Class constructor, whereas post_init is a GNES-specific method for declaring class attributes/members that can not be serialized in the stardard way. Consequently, overriding __getstate__ function is often required to deserialize the model.

As the pretrained model files can not be serialized in the standard way (via Python pickle), we need to override __getstate__ function by adding the serialization methods from PyTorch-Transformers.

class PyTorchTransformers(BaseTextEncoder):
    # ...
    
    def __getstate__(self):
        self.model.save_pretrained(self.work_dir)
        self.tokenizer.save_pretrained(self.work_dir)
        return super().__getstate__()
Implement encode method

The encode method describes the embedding logic of an encoder. Specifically, in the context of BaseTextEncoder, encode method accepts a list of strings as the argument and returns a numpy array as the embedding of it.

In the example below, the argument text is considered as a batch of sentences. They are padded to the same length, tokenized to integers and fed to the model.

import numpy as np
import torch
from gnes.helper import batching

class PyTorchTransformers(BaseTextEncoder):
    # ...

    @batching
    def encode(self, text: List[str], *args, **kwargs) -> np.ndarray:
        # encoding and padding
        ids = [self.tokenizer.encode(t) for t in text]
        max_len = max(len(t) for t in ids)
        ids = [t + [0] * (max_len - len(t)) for t in ids]
        input_ids = torch.tensor(ids)
        with torch.no_grad():
            last_hidden_states = self.model(input_ids)[0]  # Models outputs are now tuples
        self.logger.info(last_hidden_states)
        return np.array(last_hidden_states)

Breakdown of transformer.yml

The YAML config transformer.yml is pretty straightforward. It describes the parameters and arguments of PyTorchTransformers. Depending on how you implement __init__, this YAML config provides the flexibility to change the behavior of the encoder in the runtime. To know more about the syntax, please refer to this document.

!PyTorchTransformers
parameters:
  model_name: bert-base-uncased  # corresponds to the arg in __init__ func
gnes_config:
  name: my_transformer  # a customized name so one can (de)serialize the model
  is_trained: true  # indicate the model has been trained
  work_dir: /workspace
  batch_size: 128

Breakdown of Dockerfile

Finally, we can pack everything together in a docker image. I take pytorch/pytorch as the base image, install all dependencies and add transformer.py and transformer.yml to the image. Pay attention to the entrypoint I set with --yaml_path and --py_path.

FROM pytorch/pytorch

RUN pip install -U pytorch-transformers gnes --no-cache-dir --compile

ADD *.py *.yml ./

# [Optional] run a simple unit test
# you probably want to comment out this line in the CICD pipeline,
# as your CI runner for "docker build" may not have enough memory
RUN python -m unittest test_transformer.py -v

ENTRYPOINT ["gnes", "encode", "--yaml_path", "transformer.yml", "--py_path", "transformer.py", "--read_only"]

I also add a simple unit test test_transformer.py, which simulates a round-trip through frontend, preprocessor and encoder services, making sure the communication is correct. In practice, you probably don't want to include this unit test especially if your docker build is conducted in a CICD pipeline, as the CI runner may not have enough memory to load the model.

🏁 Building PyTorch-Transformers image

Finally, we build a self-contained Docker image that can be used as a GNES encoder microservice.

cd tutorial/porting-transformer
docker build -t gnes/hub-tutorial-transformers .

This should yield the following:

GNES Hub build success

To check whether the image is runnable:

docker run --rm gnes/hub-tutorial-transformers

👏 Well done! Now you can run it as a standalone GNES encoder microservice.

Porting multiple modules in a row

In this section, I will show you how to port multiple modules into GNES. This is particularly useful when you build your own PipelinePreprocessor or PipelineEncoder using multiple external components. For example,

!PipelinePreprocessor
components:
  - !MyPreprocessor1
    parameters:
      foo: hello
  - !MyPreprocessor2
    parameters:
      bar: world
gnes_config:
  name: external_preprocessor

The files needed are listed below:

Name Description
mypreprocessor1.py A Python module that implements a dummy preprocessor
mypreprocessor2.py A Python module that implements another dummy preprocessor
pipline.yml A YAML config that describes a pipeline consisted of two preprocessors
Dockerfile Dockerfile that wraps dependencies into an image

The preprocessor I wrote here simply appends some text to the document. Note how the preprocessor inherits from BaseTextPreprocessor

from gnes.preprocessor.text.base import BaseTextPreprocessor

class MyPreprocessor1(BaseTextPreprocessor):

    def __init__(self, foo, *args, **kwargs):
        super().__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.foo = foo

    def apply(self, doc: 'gnes_pb2.Document') -> None:
        super().apply(doc)
        doc.raw_text = doc.raw_bytes.decode().strip()
        doc.raw_text += self.foo
        self.logger.info(doc.raw_text)

The Dockefile is simply using GNES as base image and then adding external modules via --py_path. Notice that --py_path is followed with two files.

FROM gnes/gnes:latest-alpine

ADD *.py *.yml ./

ENTRYPOINT ["gnes", "preprocess", "--yaml_path", "pipline.yml", "--py_path", "mypreprocessor1.py", "mypreprocessor2.py", "--read_only"]  

Finally, we build a self-contained Docker image that can be used as a GNES preprocessor microservice.

cd tutorial/porting-multi-modules
docker build -t gnes/hub-tutorial-preprocessor .

To check whether the image is runnable:

docker run --rm gnes/hub-tutorial-preprocessor

👏 Well done! Now you can run it as a standalone GNES preprocessor microservice.

Cherry-picking dependencies to enable GNES built-in models

In general, the image gnes/gnes:latest only contains a barebone version of GNES, same when you install GNES via pip install gnes. It provides the minimum dependency for running GNES as a framework. All DL framework dependencies, heavy database interfaces are not installed. Although one can always use gnes/gnes:latest-full or pip install gnes[full] with all possible dependencies, it is not the most efficient and sustainable way.

Note that GNES has some built-in interfaces of the state-of-the-art ML/DL models, but they are disabled by default. In this section, I will show you how to enable a built-in feature by cherry-picking dependencies and making your own GNES image in an on-demand manner.

The files needed are listed below:

Name Description
flair.yml A YAML config that describes the Flair encoder
Dockerfile Dockerfile that wraps dependencies into an image

The following Dockerfile shows an example. We start from the Pytorch base image, install GNES with Flair (a NLP framework made by my former colleague at Zalando Research), and finally serve the encoder as the entrypoint.

FROM pytorch/pytorch

RUN pip install gnes[flair]

ENTRYPOINT ["gnes", "encode", "--yaml_path", "flair.yml", "--read_only"]

In general, one can also start with a barebone GNES base image, say gnes/gnes:latest-ubuntu18, then reinstall GNES with pip install gnes[flair]. But in this case Flair requires Pytorch as the dependency, which is pretty time-consuming to install.

Finally, we build a GNES image with Flair support and use it a GNES encoder microservice.

cd tutorial/cherrypicking-dependencies
docker build -t gnes/hub-tutorial-cherrypick-flair .

To check whether the image is runnable:

docker run --rm gnes/hub-tutorial-cherrypick-flair

👏 Well done! Now you can run it as a standalone GNES encoder microservice.

Contributing

Thanks for your interest in contributing! GNES Hub always welcome the contribution from the open-source community, individual committers and other partners. Without you, GNES Hub can't be successful.

Make sure to read the contributor guidelines before your first commit.

You can’t perform that action at this time.