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Type switch with multiple cases loses concrete type #41740

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sethvargo opened this issue Oct 1, 2020 · 2 comments
Closed

Type switch with multiple cases loses concrete type #41740

sethvargo opened this issue Oct 1, 2020 · 2 comments

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@sethvargo
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@sethvargo sethvargo commented Oct 1, 2020

What version of Go are you using (go version)?

go version go1.15.2 darwin/amd64

Does this issue reproduce with the latest release?

Yes

What operating system and processor architecture are you using (go env)?

go env Output
$ go env

GO111MODULE="on"
GOARCH="amd64"
GOBIN=""
GOCACHE="/Users/sethvargo/Library/Caches/go-build"
GOENV="/Users/sethvargo/Library/Application Support/go/env"
GOEXE=""
GOFLAGS=""
GOHOSTARCH="amd64"
GOHOSTOS="darwin"
GOINSECURE=""
GOMODCACHE="/Users/sethvargo/Development/go/pkg/mod"
GONOPROXY=""
GONOSUMDB=""
GOOS="darwin"
GOPATH="/Users/sethvargo/Development/go"
GOPRIVATE=""
GOPROXY="https://proxy.golang.org,direct"
GOROOT="/Users/sethvargo/.homebrew/Cellar/go/1.15.2/libexec"
GOSUMDB="sum.golang.org"
GOTMPDIR=""

What did you do?

https://play.golang.org/p/RSGBp79HzqT

package main

func main() {
	v := interface{}(1)

	switch t := v.(type) {
	case int, int64:
		other(int(t))
	}
}

func other(i int) {}

What did you expect to see?

Since all types in the case statement are int, I would expect t to be either an int or int64 inside of the case statement.

What did you see instead?

When given multiple items on a case statement, t is interface{} instead of the concrete type.

More

I think I understand why this behavior exists. For example, given:

switch t := v.(type) {
case int, string:
}

t isn't specific enough.

I would expect either one of the following:

  • This is a compile-time error. Attempting to switch on a type assertion where a case statement has more than one value and the concrete type is used inside the case does not compile.

  • If all the types are of the same type family, allow it.

Without this, you're left with some rather unnecessarily and possibly error-prone Go code like:

switch t := raw.(type) {
case uint:
  id = t
case uint8:
  id = uint(t)
case uint16:
  id = uint(t)
case uint32:
  id = uint(t)
case uint64:
  id = uint(t)
case int:
  id = uint(t)
case int8:
  id = uint(t)
case int16:
  id = uint(t)
case int32:
  id = uint(t)
case int64:
  id = uint(t)
default:
  return fmt.Errorf("bad type %T", t)
}

versus the much shorter and possibly less error-prone:

switch t := raw.(type) {
case uint, uint8, uint16, uint32, uint64, uintptr:
  id = uint64(t)
case int, int8, int16, int32, int64:
  id = uint64(t)
default:
  return fmt.Errorf("bad type %T", t)
}
@sethvargo
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@sethvargo sethvargo commented Oct 1, 2020

@randall77
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@randall77 randall77 commented Oct 1, 2020

This is intentional and written in the language spec.

The TypeSwitchGuard may include a short variable declaration. When that form is used, the variable is declared at the end of the TypeSwitchCase in the implicit block of each clause. In clauses with a case listing exactly one type, the variable has that type; otherwise, the variable has the type of the expression in the TypeSwitchGuard.

Go doesn't really have a way of unioning two types, so that's what we have to do.

Closing. Any change here would have to go through the proposal process.

@randall77 randall77 closed this Oct 1, 2020
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