Skip to content
Permalink
Branch: master
Find file Copy path
Find file Copy path
6 contributors

Users who have contributed to this file

@utkarshbhatt12 @goldbergyoni @autoboxer @EvgenyOrekhov @DouglasMV @BrunoScheufler
79 lines (58 sloc) 3.94 KB

Use Async-Await or promises for async error handling

One Paragraph Explainer

Callbacks don’t scale well since most programmers are not familiar with them. They force to check errors all over, deal with nasty code nesting and make it difficult to reason about the code flow. Promise libraries like BlueBird, async, and Q pack a standard code style using RETURN and THROW to control the program flow. Specifically, they support the favorite try-catch error handling style which allows freeing the main code path from dealing with errors in every function

Code Example – using promises to catch errors

return functionA()
  .then((valueA) => functionB(valueA))
  .then((valueB) => functionC(valueB))
  .then((valueC) => functionD(valueC))
  .catch((err) => logger.error(err))
  .then(alwaysExecuteThisFunction())

Code Example - using async/await to catch errors

async function executeAsyncTask () {
  try {
    const valueA = await functionA();
    const valueB = await functionB(valueA);
    const valueC = await functionC(valueB);
    return await functionD(valueC);
  }
  catch(err) {
    logger.error(err);
  }
}

Anti pattern code example – callback style error handling

getData(someParameter, function(err, result) {
    if(err !== null) {
        // do something like calling the given callback function and pass the error
        getMoreData(a, function(err, result) {
            if(err !== null) {
                // do something like calling the given callback function and pass the error
                getMoreData(b, function(c) {
                    getMoreData(d, function(e) {
                        if(err !== null ) {
                            // you get the idea? 
                        }
                    })
                });
            }
        });
    }
});

Blog Quote: "We have a problem with promises"

From the blog pouchdb.com

……And in fact, callbacks do something even more sinister: they deprive us of the stack, which is something we usually take for granted in programming languages. Writing code without a stack is a lot like driving a car without a brake pedal: you don’t realize how badly you need it until you reach for it and it’s not there. The whole point of promises is to give us back the language fundamentals we lost when we went async: return, throw, and the stack. But you have to know how to use promises correctly in order to take advantage of them.

Blog Quote: "The promises method is much more compact"

From the blog gosquared.com

………The promises method is much more compact, clearer and quicker to write. If an error or exception occurs within any of the ops it is handled by the single .catch() handler. Having this single place to handle all errors means you don’t need to write error checking for each stage of the work.

Blog Quote: "Promises are native ES6, can be used with generators"

From the blog StrongLoop

….Callbacks have a lousy error-handling story. Promises are better. Marry the built-in error handling in Express with promises and significantly lower the chances of an uncaught exception. Promises are native ES6, can be used with generators, and ES7 proposals like async/await through compilers like Babel

Blog Quote: "All those regular flow control constructs you are used to are completely broken"

From the blog Benno’s

……One of the best things about asynchronous, callback-based programming is that basically all those regular flow control constructs you are used to are completely broken. However, the one I find most broken is the handling of exceptions. Javascript provides a fairly familiar try…catch construct for dealing with exceptions. The problem with exceptions is that they provide a great way of short-cutting errors up a call stack, but end up being completely useless if the error happens on a different stack…

You can’t perform that action at this time.