Frog is a static web site generator implemented in Racket, targeting Bootstrap and able to use Pygments.
Racket CSS HTML Python Emacs Lisp

README.md

Frog

Happy Green frog

Frog image by @Goug8888, used under Creative Commons license Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic.

Build Status raco pkg install frog MIT License

Overview

Frog is a static web site generator written in Racket.

You write content in Markdown or Scribble. You generate files. To deploy, you push them to a GitHub Pages repo (or copy them to Amazon S3, or whatever).

Posts get a variety of automatic blog features.

You can also create non-post pages.

The generated site uses Bootstrap, which is responsive, automatically adapting to various screen sizes.

Yes, it's very much like Octopress and others. But Frog doesn't require installing Ruby. Installing Racket is typically waaaay simpler and faster.

The only non-Racket part is optionally using Pygments to do syntax highlighting.

Q: "Frog"?
A: Frozen blog.

MIT license.

Quick Start

Installing Frog

  1. Install Racket 6.0 or newer.

    TIP: On OS X you will need to add /Applications/Racket\ 6.1/bin (or similar) to your OS X PATH in order to be able to run things like racket or raco at the command line.

  2. Install Frog: $ raco pkg install frog.

  3. Optional: Install Pygments if you want syntax highlighting for fenced code blocks: $ sudo easy_install --upgrade Pygments.

    NOTE: If that fails, first install easy_install -- e.g. $ sudo apt-get install python-setuptools -- and try again.

    NOTE: Why --upgrade? You probably want the most recent version of Pygments because new languages are constantly being added. For example, Racket is supported starting in Pygments 1.6.

Updating Frog

To update Frog and its dependencies:

raco pkg update --update-deps frog

Starting a new blog project

Creating a new blog project is 3 easy steps:

# 1. Create a subdir
$ mkdir frog-project

# 2. Go there
$ cd frog-project

# 3. Tell Frog to create default files and dirs
$ raco frog --init
Configuration /tmp/frog-project/.frogrc not found; using defaults.
Creating files in /tmp/frog-project/:
/tmp/frog-project/.frogrc
/tmp/frog-project/_src/About.md
/tmp/frog-project/_src/page-template.html
/tmp/frog-project/_src/post-template.html
/tmp/frog-project/_src/posts/2012-01-01-a-2012-blog-post.md
/tmp/frog-project/css/
/tmp/frog-project/js/
/tmp/frog-project/img/
Project ready. Try `raco frog -bp` to build and preview.

You can go ahead and build/preview this to get a feel for the default starting point:

# Build and preview it
$ raco frog -bp
Using configuration /tmp/frog-project/.frogrc
13:28 Done generating files
Your Web application is running at http://localhost:3000/.
Stop this program at any time to terminate the Web Server.
# The home page should launch in your web browser.
# Switch back to the command prompt and type C-c to quit:
^C
Web Server stopped.

Project file tree

Here is the file tree that raco frog --init creates for you and Frog expects:

project/
  # Files provided by you:
  .frog/build   # a cache to support minimal rebuilds
  .frogrc       # see next section of README for details
  _src/         # default. see `source-dir` in .frogrc
    page-template.html  # lets you define the page layout
    post-template.html  # lets you define the <article> layout
    posts/
      # You'll create these using `raco frog -n <post-title>`
      2013-01-01-a-blog-post.md
      2013-02-15-another-blog-post.md
      ...
    # Zero or more other .md files for non-post pages.
    # May be in subdirs.
  css/
    bootstrap.css            #\
    bootstrap.min.css        # get these files
    bootstrap-theme.css      # from getbootstrap.com
    bootstrap-theme.min.css  #/
    pygments.css             # used to style code elements from Pygments
    custom.css               # other styles you provide; may be empty
  js/
    bootstrap.js             # get these files
    bootstrap.min.js         # from Bootstrap
  img/
    feed.png
  favicon.ico

Here are the files created by Frog when you run raco frog -b to (re)build the blog:

project/        # default. see `output-dir` in .frogrc
  index*.html
  sitemap.txt
  tags/
  feeds/
  # Post pages in subdirs.
  # Exact layout depends on `permalink` in `.frogrc`.
  blog/
    2013/
      01/
        a-blog-post-title/
          index.html
        ...
    2013/
      02/
        another-blog-post-title/
          index.html
        ...
  ...

NOTE: Although the Frog /example project has copies for example purposes, for your own project you should get the official/latest Bootstrap 3 files directly from Bootstrap.

TIP: To design a Bootstrap 3 "theme", try Bootstrap Magic.

Also, http://bootswatch.com/ has some ready-made themes.

TIP: For examples of pygments.css code highlighting styles see https://github.com/richleland/pygments-css.

Per-project configuration: .frogrc

raco frog --init creates a .frogrc file in your project directory:

# Required: Should NOT end in trailing slash.
scheme/host = http://www.example.com

# A path prepended to URIs, including those specified here in .frogrc
# such as `permalink` and `posts-index-uri`. Defaults to `/`. This is
# useful when you want to embed your blog in another web site.
uri-prefix = /

# The title of the blog. Used when generating feeds.
title = My Awesome Blog

# The author. Used when generating feeds, and provided to
# `page-template.html` as the template variable `@author`.
author = The Unknown Author

# What editor to launch with --edit. $EDITOR means to use $EDITOR from
# the environment
editor = $EDITOR

# The command to run, in case you need to customize how the editor is
# called. For example, {editor} {filename} will call:
# (system "$EDITOR 2012-01-01-a-blog-post.md")
# See the test submodule in paths.rkt for more examples
editor-command = {editor} {filename}

# Whether to show the count of posts next to each tag in the
# `page-template` variable `tags/feeds`.
show-tag-counts? = true

# Pattern for blog post permalinks
# Optional: Default is "/{year}/{month}/{title}.html".
# Here's an example of the Jekyll "pretty" style:
permalink = /blog/{year}/{month}/{day}/{title}/index.html
# There is also {filename}, which is the `this-part` portion of
# your post's YYYY-MM-DD-this-part.md file name. This is in case
# you don't like Frog's encoding of your post title and want to
# specify it exactly yourself, e.g. to match a previous blog URI.

# Should index page items contain full posts -- more than just the
# portion above "the jump" <!-- more --> marker (if any)?
index-full? = true

# Should feed items contain full posts -- more than just the portion
# above "the jump" <!-- more --> marker (if any)?
feed-full? = true

# How many posts per page for index pages?
posts-per-page = 10

# How many items to include in feeds?
# Older items in excess of this will not appear in the feed at all.
max-feed-items = 20

# Decorate feed URIs with Google Analytics query parameters like
# utm_source ?
decorate-feed-uris? = true

# Insert in each feed item an image bug whose URI is decorated with
# Google Analytics query parameters like utm_source ?
feed-image-bugs? = true

# Replace links to tweets with embedded tweets?
# In Markdown, must be auto-links alone in a pargraph (blank lines
# above and below), for example:
#
# <https://twitter.com/racketlang/status/332176422003163138>
#
auto-embed-tweets? = true

# When embedding tweets that are replies, show the parent tweet along
# with the reply?
embed-tweet-parents? = true

# Try to automatically link symbols in Markdown ```racket fenced code
# blocks, to Racket documentation?
racket-doc-link-code? = true

# Try to automatically link Markdown of the form `symbol`[racket] to
# Racket documentation? i.e. This is similar to the @racket[] form in
# Scribble.
racket-doc-link-prose? = true

# The source directory. Defaults to "_src".
#
# If you deploy to GitHub pages then it is simplest to keep this under
# the repo/project top directory.
#
# This may be an absolute or relative path. If relative, it's relative
# to the project top directory, i.e. to where this .frogrc file is
# located.
source-dir = _src

# The output directory where generated HTML and other files should go.
#
# If you deploy to e.g. GitHub pages then it is simplest to put the
# output in the repo/project top directory, which is why this defaults
# to ".".  But you may change it if you prefer to copy the output
# files to their final destination.
#
# This may be an absolute or relative path. If relative, it's relative
# to the project top directory, i.e. to where this .frogrc file is
# located.
output-dir = .

# Options controlling Pygments' HTML format.
## Whether to use line numbers.
pygments-linenos? = true
## CSS class for the wrapping <div> tag (default: 'highlight').
pygments-cssclass = source

Creating blog posts

A typical workflow:

  1. Create a new post with raco frog -n "My Post Title". The name of the new .md file is displayed to stdout.

  2. Edit the .md file in your preferred plain text editor.

  3. Regenerate your site and preview it with raco frog -bp. (You might repeat steps 2 and 3 a few times until you're satisfied.)

  4. Deploy. If you're using GitHub Pages, you can commit and push to deploy to your real site. If you're using some other method, you can copy or rsync the files to your static file server.

TIP: If you use Emacs, try markdown-mode. Although Markdown is really simple, markdown-mode makes it even more enjoyable.

Posts

You create new posts in _src/posts. There are several source formats.

Markdown source files

Post source files in markdown format should be named YYYY-MM-DD-TITLE.md and need to have some meta-data in the first few lines.

You can do raco frog -n "My Title" to create such a file easily. This will also fill in the required meta-data section. The markdown file starts with a code block (indented 4 spaces) that must contain these three lines:

    Title: A blog post
    Date: 2012-01-01T00:00:00
    Tags: foo, bar, tag with spaces, baz

Everything from here to the end is your post's contents.

If you put `<!-- more -->` on a line, that is the "above-the-fold"
marker. Contents above the line are the "summary" for index pages and
Atom feeds.

<!-- more -->

Contents below `<!-- more -->` are omitted from index pages and Atom
feeds. A "Continue reading..." link is provided instead.

Title can be anything.

Date must be an ISO-8601 datetime string: yyyy-mm-ddThr:mn:sc.

Tags are optional (although you have to include the Tags: part).

The tag DRAFT (all uppercase) causes the post .html file not to be generated.

Markdown template files (experimental)

Files with a .mdt extension are first evaluated as templates. The resulting text is fed to the markdown parser, as for a .md plain markdown source.

Such files may be used as the source for both posts and non-post pages.

There are no template variables -- not even when the file is being used as the source of a post. The template evaluation occurs prior to the extraction of the post meta-data.

Code blocks in markdown files

Frog optionally uses Pygments to do syntax highlighting. When using fenced code blocks, you can specify a language (as on GitHub):

```language
some lines
of code
```

That language is given to Pygments as the lexer to use.

For example this:

```js
/**
 * Some JavaScript
 */
function foo()
{
    if (counter <= 10)
        return;
    // it works!
```

Yields this using the js lexer:

/**
 * Some JavaScript
 */
function foo()
{
    if (counter <= 10)
        return;
    // it works!

And this:

```racket
#lang racket
;; Finds Racket sources in all subdirs
(for ([path (in-directory)])
  (when (regexp-match? #rx"[.]rkt$" path)
    (printf "source file: ~a\n" path)))
```

Yields this using the racket lexer:

#lang racket
;; Finds Racket sources in all subdirs
(for ([path (in-directory)])
  (when (regexp-match? #rx"[.]rkt$" path)
    (printf "source file: ~a\n" path)))

The colors are controlled by your css/pygments.css file. There are examples of many styles.

If you use larger font sizes, code may wrap and get out of alignment with the line numbers. To avoid the wrapping, add the following to your css/custom.css:

/* When highlighted code blocks are too wide, they wrap. Resulting in the */
/* line numbers column's rows not lining up with the code rows. Prevent */
/* wrapping. */
pre {
    white-space: pre;
    width: inherit;
}

NOTE: Pygments has lexers for many, many languages. Plus, it fits the spirit of static web site generation better than JavaScript options like SyntaxHighlighter.

Scribble source files

Post source files in Scribble format should be named YYYY-MM-DD-TITLE.scrbl and need to have some meta-data in the first few lines.

You can do raco frog -N "My Title" to create such a file easily. This will also fill in the required meta-data section.

See the example Scribble post and example Scribble non-post page for more information.

Automatic post features

Posts are automatically included in various index pages and feeds.

Posts with any tag go on the home page /index.html, in an Atom feed /feeds/all.atom.xml, and in an RSS feed /feeds/all.rss.xml.

Posts for each tag go on an index page /tags/<tag>.html, in an Atom feed /feeds/<tag>.atom.xml, and in an RSS feed /feeds/<tag>.rss.xml.

The default template post-template.html provides:

  • Twitter and Google+ sharing buttons.
  • Disqus comments.

The default template page-template.html (used for all pages, not just post pages) also provides:

  • Twitter follow button.
  • Google Analytics tracking.

Non-post pages

You can put .md, .mdt, and .scrbl files in _src and its subdirs (except _src/posts). They will be converted to HTML pages. For example, _src/About.md will be /About.html in the site.

NOTE: Non-post pages are not included in any automatically generated index pages or feeds. You can manually add links to them in the nav bar by editing that portion of page-template.html.

sitemap.txt

A /sitemap.txt file (for web crawlers) is automatically generated and includes all post and non-post pages. (It does not include index pages for tags.)

Templates

Frog uses the Racket web-server/templates system based on scribble/text @-expressions. This means that the files are basically normal HTML format, with the ability to use @ to reference a template variable --- or indeed to "escape" to arbitrary Racket code.

In contrast to most templating systems, you have a full programming language available -- Racket -- should you need it. However most of what you need to do will probably be very simple, such as the occasional if or when test, or perhaps defining a helper function to minimize repetition.

NOTE: If you need to require another module in your template, you must use local-require. Plain require won't work because the template is not evaluated at a module level or top level.

TIP: @"@" evaluates to a literal @. For example if you need to write an email address: foo@"@"bar.com becomes "foo@bar.com".

Understanding why this works may help you remember it:

  1. @ means "evaluate the following s-expression as Racket code".
  2. "@" is the Racket code for the string literal "@".
  3. Therefore @"@" evaluates to the string "@".

Page template: _src/page-template.html

The _src/page-template.html template specifies an <html> element used by Frog to generate every page on your site.

Anything in the file that looks like @variable or @|variable| is a template variable supplied by Frog. Most of these should be self-explanatory from their name and from seeing how they are used in the default template. Specifically:

  • contents: The contents of the page.
  • title: The title of the page (for <title>)
  • description: The description of the page (for <meta> content element)
  • keywords: The keywords for the page (for <meta> keywords element)
  • uri-path: The path portion of the URI, e.g. /path/to/file.html
  • full-uri: The full URI, e.g. http://example.com/path/to/file.html
  • atom-feed-uri: The full URI to the Atom feed
  • rss-feed-uri: The full URI to the RSS feed
  • tag: If this an index page, tag is the name of the index (such as "All Posts") or ("Posts tagged foo"), else tag is #f.
  • tags-list-items: HTML with a <li> for every tag on the blog, suitable for putting in a <ul>. Each <li> has a link to that tag's index page.
  • tags/feeds: HTML that has, for each tag, a link to its index page and a link to its Atom feed.
  • rel-prev: @(when rel-prev @list{<link rel="next" href="@|rel-next|">})
  • rel-next: @(when rel-next @list{<link rel="prev" href="@|rel-prev|">})

Post template: _src/post-template.html

The _src/post-template.html template determines how blog posts are laid out on pages that are dedicated to one post. The default template defines an <article> element.

For pages that are blog posts, the result of post-template.html becomes most of the @|contents| variable in page-template.html. In other words, the post template is effectively nested in the page template. (They are two separate templates so that the page template can also be used for pages that are not blog post pages.)

+---------------------------+
| page-template             |
|                           |
|       +---------------+   |
|       | post-template |   |
|       +---------------+   |
|                           |
+---------------------------+

NOTE: This template does not control how a blog post is laid out on an index page like /index.html or /tags/<some-tag>.html. For that, see _src/index-template.rkt.

The main purpose of this template is to specify things like Disqus comments, Tweet and +1 sharing buttons, and older/newer links --- things that only make sense in the context of pages dedicated to one blog post.

Anything in the file that looks like @variable or @|variable| is a template variable supplied by Frog. Most of these should be self-explanatory from their name and from seeing how they are used in the default template. Specifically:

  • title: The title of the post
  • uri-path: The path portion of the URI, e.g. /path/to/file.html
  • full-uri: The full URI, e.g. http://example.com/path/to/file.html
  • date-8601: The post date as a string, "YYYY-MM-DD".
  • date-struct: The post date as a racket/date date struct.
  • date: HTML to show the date of the post in a <time> element.
  • tags: HTML to show the tags of the post as links.
  • date+tags: HTML to show the date and tags of the post.
  • content: The content of the post
  • older-uri: The URI of the next older post, if any, or #f
  • older-title: The title of the next older post, if any, or #f
  • newer-uri: The URI of the next newer post, if any, or #f
  • newer-title: The title of the next newer post, if any, or #f

Index template: _src/index-template.html

The _src/index-template.html template determines how blog posts are laid out on index pages.

Typically it would be similar to your _src/post-template.rkt, but without some "footer" items like comments or previous/next post buttons.

+----------------------------+
| page-template              |
|                            |
|       +----------------+   |
|       | index-template |   |
|       +----------------+   |
|                            |
|       +----------------+   |
|       | index-template |   |
|       +----------------+   |
|                            |
|       +----------------+   |
|       | index-template |   |
|       +----------------+   |
|              . . .         |
|                            |
+----------------------------+

Anything in the file that looks like @variable or @|variable| is a template variable supplied by Frog. Most of these should be self-explanatory from their name and from seeing how they are used in the default template. Specifically:

  • title: The title of the post
  • uri-path: The path portion of the URI, e.g. /path/to/file.html
  • full-uri: The full URI, e.g. http://example.com/path/to/file.html
  • date-8601: The post date as a string, "YYYY-MM-DD".
  • date-struct: The post date as a racket/date date struct.
  • date: HTML to show the date of the post in a <time> element.
  • tags: HTML to show the tags of the post as links.
  • date+tags: HTML to show the date and tags of the post.
  • content: The content of the post plus a "More.." link when needed.
  • content-only: The content of the post, only.
  • more?: Is the content just a blurb?

Template Example

Let's say you want to customize the date display format of your posts. Instead of the default ISO-8601 YYYY-MM-DD format, you want it to be the default of the date->string function from the racket/date module. Here is what you could do in your index-template.rkt:

@(local-require racket/date)
<article>
  <header>
    <h2><a href='@|uri-path|'>@|title|</a></h2>
    <p class='date-and-tags'>
      <time datetime='@|date-8601|' pubdate='true'>
        @(date->string date-struct)
      </time>
      :: @|tags|</p>
  </header>
  @|content|
</article>

NOTE: If you need to require another module in your template, you must use local-require. Plain require won't work because the template is not evaluated at a module level or top level.

Widgets

In addition to the variables described above for each template, some predefined functions are available for templates to use: "widgets".

Anything a widget can do, you could code directly in the template. There's no magic. But widgets minimize clutter in the templates. Plus they make clearer what are the user-specific parameters (as opposed to putting stuff like <!-- CHANGE THIS! --> in the template).

For example, @google-universal-analytics["UA-xxxxx"] returns text for a <script> element to insert Google Analytics tracking code. You supply it the two user-specific pieces of information, which it plugs into the boilerplate and returns.

Likewise there are widgets for things like Twitter and Google+ share buttons, Twitter follow button, Disqus comments, older/newer post links.

See widgets.rkt for the complete list. See the example page template and example post template for usage examples.

NOTE: If you'd like to add a widget, pull requests are welcome!

Embedding a blog in an existing site

If you want to embed the entire blog in an existing site, one way is to use a subdomain, e.g. blog.example.com.

Another way is to embed your blog "under" the existing site's URI path structure, e.g. example.com/blog/. To do so:

  1. In post-template.html change URIs from / to /blog/ as appropriate.

  2. In .frogrc set uri-prefix = /blog. This causes URIs generated by Frog to be prefixed with /blog. (Other URIs in .frogrc -- such as posts-index-uri and permalink -- will automatically be prefixed with blog/, so don't change those.)

The --preview flag should open on your blog's index page at /blog/index.html, automatically. (But there's also a --root flag in case you need to control it more specifically.)

TIP: Are you a "Tilde Club" member -- your blog will be hosted at http://example.com/~user? In your Frog project directory, create an output directory named ~user: mkdir \~user (note the \~ to allow using ~ in the name). Then follow the steps above, including setting output-dir = ~user and uri-prefix = /~user in .frogrc, and adjusting your page-template.html and so on.

MathJax

To use MathJax:

  1. Add configuration to the <head> of your page-template.html. For a standard MathJax configuration simply add @math-jax[] (call the the math-jax function from widgets.rkt).

  2. In your markdown source files, use \\( some math \\) for inline and \\[ some math \\] for display. (Note the double backslashes, \\, because in markdown \ already has a meaning.)

The serve function

If you wish to create your own static website, you can still take advantage of continuous building when files change. Place (require frog) in your module, and use the serve function (found in frog/frog.rkt) to continuously build your website.

Bug reports? Feature requests?

Please use GitHub Issues.