Skip to content
Permalink
Branch: master
Find file Copy path
Find file Copy path
Fetching contributors…
Cannot retrieve contributors at this time
11313 lines (11312 sloc) 707 KB
[
{
"id": 1,
"year": 1886,
"decade": 1880,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Then the names of all the other things on board a ship! I don't know half of them yet; even the sailors forget at times, and if the exact name of anything they want happens to slip from their memory, they call it a chicken~fixing, or a gadjet, or a gill-guy, or a timmey-noggy, or a wim-womjust pro tem., you know.",
"author": "Brown, Robert",
"title": "Spunyarn and spindrift: a sailor boy's log of a voyage out and home in a china tea-clipper",
"source": "London: Houlston and Sons, xxi. 378.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 2,
"year": 1888,
"decade": 1880,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "So we gaily essayed the passage, which Jim accomplished safely; but just as the Skipper was stepping off his bridge on to the bank the treacherous bark gave way (this is the worst danger in walking on fallen trees), and with a mighty splash he and his rifle went into the deepest hole in the creek. He thought it best to get out at once, but too late to save his watch, which he opened, and found that the escapement had floated round to the back of the mainspring and jammed the gadget that the chunkerblock would not work. But we were equal to the emergency, and in two minutes had frizzled all the water out of the works by unscrewing the large lens of the binocular and using it as a burning glass. It had a wonderful effect, and with a little coaxing the watch began to go; then we hung it on a tree with the mechanism still exposed to the rays of the sun, and went on our way rejoicing.",
"author": "Lees, J.A. and Clutterbuck, W.J.",
"title": "B.C. 1887: A Ramble in British Columbia",
"source": "London: Longmans, Green and Co, 87",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 3,
"year": 1899,
"decade": 1890,
"primary": "vehicle",
"secondary": "british+nautical",
"quote": "A trial recently took place at Bristol (as reported in the Bristol Times and Mirror of 10 June) for damage done to a 'gadget.' The word does not occur in Halliwell, Smyth's 'Sailor's Word-Book,' or the 'H.E.D.' It evidently is the name of some kind of boat, which in the present case was used for the discharge of vessels in the harbour. Can any correspondent kindly give an exact definition, and also suggest its history and probable derivation? Is it local, or an importaiton, or a new coinage?",
"author": "W.F.R.",
"title": "Notes and Queries ",
"source": "s9-III: 488",
"archive": "",
"notes": "First query on the term in Notes and Queries.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 4,
"year": 1899,
"decade": 1890,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "…for on taking the wheel I found a machine under my hands such as I never even heard of before. The wheel was fixed upon the tiller in such a manner that the whole concern travelled backwards and forwards across the deck in the maddest kind of way. […] I fairly shook with apprehension lest the mate should come and look in the compass. I had been accustomed to hard words if I did not steer within half a point each way; but here was a 'gadget' that worked me to death, the result a wake like the letter S. Gradually I got the hang of the thing, becoming easier in my mind on my own account. Even that was not an unmixed blessing, for I had now some leisure to listen to the goings-on around the deck.",
"author": "Bullen, Frank T.",
"title": "The Cruise of the Cachalot: Round the World After Sperm Whales",
"source": "New York: D. Appleton and Company. 7-8",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 5,
"year": 1900,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "If your engine has a linking in gadget on the I.P. valve gear, it would be well to link it in a little, giving the I.P. a shorter cut off, and an increase of power in the I.P. cylinder would result and the H.P. would be decreased a corresponding amount, and the respective powers would even up to about 88 I.H.P. each.",
"author": "",
"title": "Queries and Answers",
"source": "Marine Engineering, vol. 5. July, 1900. p. 316",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Queries and Answers section. on a question about improving engine pistons.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 6,
"year": 1902,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "british+lit",
"quote": "Directly under the car he lay and looked upward into pipes--petrol, steam, and water--with a keen and searching eye. / I telegraphed Mr. Pyecroft a question. / 'Not--in--the--least,' was the answer. 'Steam gadgets always take him that way. We had a bit of a riot at Parsley Green through his tryin' to show a traction-engine haulin' gipsy-wagons how to turn corners.\" […] \"'But, after all, it's your steamin' gadgets he's usin' for his libretto, as you might put it.\" Pyecroft to narrator about Hinch, who was formerly terrified, driving around the car. […] \"'But I will say for you, Hinch, you've certainly got the hang of her steamin' gadgets in quick time.' / He was driving very sweetly, but with a worried look in his eye and a tremor in his arm.",
"author": "Kipling, Rudyard",
"title": "Steam Tactics",
"source": "orig. 1902, first published in book form with Traffics and Discoveries, 1904",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 7,
"year": 1902,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "raygun",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "Before I had time to question him as to his meaning, the old man emerged from the cabin loaded with sundry strange-looking machines, and followed by the steward bearing more. For a few minutes he was mighty busy placing his menagerie in order, and then he turned to me and said briskly, 'Now, Mr. Roper, I'm all ready, go forrard and invite the hands aft to the lecture.' […] The skipper was as busy as two people about his wheels and things, and the unhappy steward like an image of fear obeyed mechanically the various commands of his dread master. At last a whirring sound was heard like the humming of some huge imprisoned bee, and to this accompaniment the skipper took up his parable and preceded to talk. […] Indeed, from what I could see of their faces, I believe every other sense was merged in the full expectation of an explosion, and they couldn't have taken their strained eyes off the buzzing gadget in their midst for any consideration whatever.\" a monkey rushes the apparatus, something explodes, then: \"'Mr. Roper, I shan't give any more scientific exhibitions this trip; I think they're immoral.' With that he hobbled into his cabin, and we saw no more of him for a week. When we did, you couldn't have got a grain of science out of him with a small-tooth comb…",
"author": "Bullen, Frank T.",
"title": "Deep-Sea Plunderings",
"source": "New York: D. Appleton and Company. 1902. 138-9",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 8,
"year": 1903,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "nautical+british+lit",
"quote": "Thus we'ave the starboard side completely blocked an' the general traffic tricklin' over'ead along the fore-an'-aft bridge. Then Chips gets into her an' begins balin' out a mess o' small reckonin's on the deck. Simultaneous there come up three o' those dirty engine-room objects which we call 'tiffies,' an' a stoker or two with orders to repair her steamin' gadgets. They get into her an' bale out another young Christmas-treeful of small reckonin's--brass mostly.",
"author": "Kipling, Rudyard",
"title": "The Bonds of Discipline",
"source": "orig. 1903, first published in book form with Traffics and Discoveries, 1904",
"archive": "",
"notes": "of a steam car, i.e. the Locomobile, where the protagonist picks up Pyecroft",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 9,
"year": 1903,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "nautical+british+lit",
"quote": "Two Six Seven's steam-gadgets was paralytic. Our Mr. Moorshed done his painstakin' best--it's his first command of a war-canoe, matoor age nineteen…",
"author": "Kipling, Rudyard",
"title": "Their Lawful Occasions",
"source": "orig. 1903, then Traffics and Discoveries, 1904",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 10,
"year": 1904,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "british+lit",
"quote": "He stood up and steadied himself by a stanchion, in the middle of the front seat, which carried the big acetylene lamp. / 'This is like the gyroscope gadget on the Portsmouth submarines. Does she dive?' said he.",
"author": "Kipling, Rudyard",
"title": "A Tour of Inspection",
"source": "The Metropolitan Magazine. v21n1. October, 1904. p. 4",
"archive": "",
"notes": "a story of cars and gearheads",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 11,
"year": 1904,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "nautical+british",
"quote": "Why, I'm blest, if it ain't old Bobby first this time,' ejaculated the Flag-Captain, 'that's her boat, with the curly gadget on the bows, right enough. 'Strordinary!",
"author": "Parker, G.R.",
"title": "The Commission of H.M.S. Implacable: Mediterranean Station, 1901-1904",
"source": "p. ix.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 12,
"year": 1905,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "propername",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "But, as above stated, the methods of tying the cotton while under this extreme pressure as usually practiced are such that when the pressure is removed the bales expand until their density is only about 22.5 or 23 pounds to the cubic foot. Various methods have been used to prevent this expansion, at least in part, and so produce a bale of greater density. These methods seem to be practicable, though of varying utility, but they all involve increased expense. Among them is the Gadget process, so called, an attachment by which wires are drawn tightly around the bale and twisted while the cotton is held between the jaws of the compress. By this method a density of perhaps 30 to 35 pounds is retained, and bales of that density and consequently smaller size would apparently permit car loadings of 40,000 pounds and upwards. To what extent the Gadget attachment is in actual use is not disclosed by the testimony. […] By the use of the Gadget attachment and similar devices a bale of still greater density is produced which loads readily 35,000 to 40,000 pounds.",
"author": "",
"title": "Decisions of the Interstate Commerce Commission of the United States. No 692. Planters' Compress Company v. Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway Company; New York Central & Hudson Railway Company",
"source": "Interstate Commerce Reports vol. 11.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "on transporting cotton, and how to charge by carload or by weight… Rule in favor of railroads, who refuse to \"grant lower rates on cotton in carloads of 45,000 pounds or more.\" http://bit.ly/cQsNgy",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 13,
"year": 1906,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "nautical+definition",
"quote": "Gadget'--a make-shift name for any object.",
"author": "Beyer, Thomas",
"title": "The American Battleship in Commission: As Seen by an Enlisted Man",
"source": "Washington D.C.: Army and Navy Register. 1906",
"archive": "",
"notes": "in a section of \"Man-o'-War Lino,\" or sailor terminology",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 14,
"year": 1907,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "nautical+british",
"quote": "an appliance to clean the bottom of the ship, without the necessity of dry-docking or employment of drivers. It consists of an oblong structure armed with wire brushes, and looks very much like a door-mat. This is pulled forwards and backwards by stout hawsers, made fast to the ship's steam capstans. It can be made to traverse any path the operator requires. The bristles of the brushes are magnetised, so that they both attract themselves to the iron of the ship's side and scrape as well.\" / \"It was wonderful to see how quickly the news spread round the ship that the electric scrubbing gadget was worried satisfactorily.",
"author": "",
"title": "The Navy from an Inventor's Point of View",
"source": "Blackwood's Magazine, vol. 182[?] Dec. 1907. p. 746",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 15,
"year": 1908,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "nautical+definition",
"quote": "Mr. Caffin smiled, stroking his sandy 'gadget,' so called by his friends as 'a nameless, improvised thing.' 'You're a machine at all the old tricks. But when it comes to modern initiative--God knows, you must jack up those men yourself. I'm close, but you're their skin.",
"author": "Saint-Gaudens, Homer",
"title": "Man the Machine",
"source": "The Metropolitan Magazine. v.27n6. March, 1908",
"archive": "",
"notes": " Almost nonsensical, even in context… attempting sailor dialect",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 16,
"year": 1908,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "I'd like to have a ten-minute session with the bow-legged tailor that put the latest gadget stitch on those trousers.",
"author": "Dermody, D.E.",
"title": "The Key to the Bull's Eyes: A Story of the Fleet",
"source": "The Pacific Monthly [a magazine on Oregon]. v19n6. June 1908",
"archive": "",
"notes": "a commander reprimanding his crew for having non-regulation uniforms, having made modifications",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 17,
"year": 1908,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The chief, with an eye to curbing the speeding proclivities of the automobile set, purchased a motorcycle that was guaranteed to run like the dickens. And it did, too, the first time the chief took the road. Accidentally pressing the wrong gadget or something, the thing bounded away like a stung deer.",
"author": "",
"title": "Runs Away With Chief",
"source": "Motorcycle Illustrated. June, 1908. p. 26. ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 18,
"year": 1909,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The erector arm was attached to the tunnel segments by a gadget (Fig. 15).",
"author": "Japp, Henry",
"title": "The New York Tunnel Extension of the Pennsylvania Railroad: Contractors' Plant for East River Tunnels",
"source": "Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers. vol. 35, no. 9. (November 1909)",
"archive": "",
"notes": " looks like a huge lifting mechanism to install tunnel segments, and the \"gadget\" is the piece that attaches the \"erector\" to the segments",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 19,
"year": 1909,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "propername",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The smooth patch, together with paper or tin bags properly marked, I am quite sure would preserve the identity of each bale of cotton from the time it leaves the compress until it reaches the factory; and in the case of the tin tag this would be true though every particle of the covering should be torn from the bale in transit. The tin tag in its present shape can not be used successfully on cotton banded with Churchill patented wire-tying machine, the 'Gadget,' but it would no doubt be made to conform to the new system. When the 'Gadget' comes into general use cotton would be so much more mercifully handled by stevedores in breaking out at destination port that the smooth patch and the paper bag will likely be found to accomplish the end aimed at.",
"author": "",
"title": "Atlanta Topic--1900",
"source": "Compilation of Convention Topics: American Association of Local Freight Agents' Associations 412",
"archive": "",
"notes": "question: \"What tally system or plan will overcome errors incident to handling cotton in and out of car, and in and out of storage warehouse?\" Answer, from a report in 1901",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 20,
"year": 1909,
"decade": 1900,
"primary": "",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "",
"author": "Hospitalier, E. ",
"title": "Vocabulaire français-anglais-allemand: technique, industrielle, et commercial",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Translates \"Gadget\" as \"Dispositif.\"",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 21,
"year": 1910,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "In order to unite these plates by close-fitting joints, the contact surfaces were machined. At the centre of an ordinary segment a hole was tapped to receive a 1.25 inch pipe. This was the grout hole. […] The lug which, with the Hudson Companies, formed an integral part of the ordinary segment, was here omitted. A gadget was employed instead, in connection with a corresponding pair of bolt holes near the centre. The device furnished a means by which the mechanical erector controlled the plate. However, a great deal of placing was done by hand, in spite of the fact that all pieces except the key weighed a ton each.",
"author": "Springer, J.F.",
"title": "The River Tunnels at New York",
"source": "Cassier's Magazine: An Engineering Monthly. vol. 37 no. 5. March, 1910.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "On the newly completed East River Tunnels, connecting to Penn Station",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 22,
"year": 1910,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "No lug was cast on the segments for attachment to the erector, but in its place the gadget shown on Fig. 4, Plate LXX, was inserted in one of the pairs of bolt holes near the center of the plate, and was held in position by the running nut at one end.",
"author": "Brace, James H. and Mason, Francis",
"title": "The New York Tunnel Extension of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The Cross-Town Tunnels.",
"source": "Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers. vol. 68, Paper no. 1158. 1910. p. 460",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 23,
"year": 1910,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "In the cell-like silence of the white cylinder, he cast his eyes upon each bright gadget crowded about him--the telescope sights, air-blast, hoist-controller--as if trying to fix the look of each irrevocably on his mind. Then he shut his eyes as he crawled to the deck under the turret.",
"author": "Dunn, Robert",
"title": "The Real Atlantis: A Story of the United States Navy",
"source": "Everybody's Magazine. v22n1. January 1910. p. 112",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 24,
"year": 1910,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "Further, at Cape Evans there had been running for more than three months a scientific station, which rivaled in thoroughness and exactitude any other such station in the world. I hope that later a more detailed account may be given of this continuous series of observations, some of them demanding the most complex mechanism, and all of the watched over by enthusiastic experts. It must here suffice to say that we who on our return saw for the first time the hut and its annexes completely equipped were amazed; though perhaps the gadget which appealed most to us at first was the electric apparatus by which the cook, whose invention it was, controlled the rising of his excellent bread.",
"author": "Cherry-Garrard, Aspley",
"title": "The Worst Journey in the World",
"source": "Bremen: Salzwasser Verlag",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 25,
"year": 1912,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "british+lit",
"quote": "This is a political tract, set in a boiler-room (similar to those in coal-burning vessels of the time) in Hell where various souls are being punished for their sins. \"'Harnessed up the tide--the cool, big, wet, deep, blue, sparkling sea. I believe they did it on the pneumatic principle, not on the hydraulic, if you're interested in those things.' 'I ain't,' Mr. Sugden retorted. 'I'm only concerned with outstanding social facts. We leave machinery to the intellectuals.' 'That's very kind of you. The inventor of this particular gadget was the son of a woman who committed suicide somewhere in the Potteries, I'm told.",
"author": "Kipling, Rudyard",
"title": "The Benefactors",
"source": " The American Magazine v74n3 July",
"archive": "",
"notes": "humorous look at the development and conception of weapons of war",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 26,
"year": 1912,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Fig. 14 shows method of erecting the segments on the upper quarter. The segments were attached to the erector bar by a gadget with a large nut on one plain screwed end, and a flanged spigot on the other; the nut was run back far enough to insert the gadget, and the nut was spun by hand very quickly to lock it in place. This is a very effective way of lifting the segments and saved the expense of casting iron lugs on each segment. The cast iron in the four tunnels represents about 100,000 tons; each segment weight about one ton, so about 100,000 lugs were saved.",
"author": "Japp, Henry",
"title": "Subaqueous Tunneling",
"source": "The Engineer's Club of Philadelphia vol 29 1912",
"archive": "",
"notes": "On the East River Tunnel project",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 626,
"year": 1912,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "language",
"secondary": "finance",
"quote": "A sound way to appraise the validity of a proposed budgetary gadget is to examine the value system of its architect. Budget systems are not neutral. They are designed on the basis of particular presuppositions as to the objectives of budget control, although these assumptions may be implicit rather than explicit. Different architects of budgetary systems may espouse different sets of values, and for this reason may have trouble in agreeing on a common blueprint.",
"author": "March, Michael S.",
"title": "A Comment on Budgetary Improvement in the National Government",
"source": "National Tax Journal, v. 5, n. 2, June 1952",
"archive": "google",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 622,
"year": 1913,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "\"My name is--er--Gadget,\" exclaimed the nervous stranger, and trod short-sightedly upon O Miya San.",
"author": "",
"title": "",
"source": "The English Review, Duckworth & Co., vol. 14",
"archive": "google",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 624,
"year": 1914,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "matic+aviation",
"quote": "\"Having personally searched through the British patents before taking out my own, I can well understand your objection to 'gadget' stabilisers. Only one or two, if any, of the inventions ot be found there bear the stamp of the practical man, few appear to be products of men who had had any experience of aeroplanes, mostly the inventor seems to have had a 'nebulous fancy which passed with him for thought.' None the less, when one considers how cheaply such an apparatus as I have suggested could be put to the test, it seems a pity that we should not learn whatever it has to teach us, always bearing in mind that experimental mechanism must be capable of instant disconnection at the pilot's discretion.\" / A well known aviator writes:--\"I must give vent to my feelings about 'gadget stabilisers.' First of all I must admit ot being prejudiced against any such thing. Not only would any such device give me 'cold feet,' but probably cold hands as well, having nothing to do with them, in the shape of stick wagging, etc., but seriously there is one point which I do not think anybody has yet brought up, and that is this: With the arrival of the fool-proof aeroplane, which the birth of 'gadget' devices seems to herald, there will have also to arise, and probably will, a fool (not proof) market to buy them. This, as it should be, is good for trade, but m yfear is that with the arrival of this class of buyer there is a grave danger of there arising a host of incompetent builders, who each and all will strive to turn out a cheap machine, and in this ambition they will be most undesirably assisted by the 'gadget stabiliser,' for instead of spending money on designing a machine properly, any old thing with wings will do, if fitted with some patent gadget which will do it for them. But what about it, if this gadget jams or dislocates itself, as all such things must do some time or other?\"",
"author": "",
"title": "The Stability of Aeroplanes",
"source": "The Aeroplane, January 29, 1914",
"archive": "google",
"notes": "Automating an airplane's flight, rather than leaving it up to the skill of the pilot",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "x"
},
{
"id": 631,
"year": 1914,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Of the making of motor accessories anything that can be screwed or stuck on to any part of a car under the claim of increasing the efficiency of that part—like the making of books, there is no end. Most of them outweigh by their certain cost and manifest complication, any advantage their use could obtain. I make however, an exception of the tell-tale type of gadget, as prevention of trouble is better than the cure which at the same time may kill. One of these is an overheating tell-tale in the form of a plug set into the water circulation, electrically connected with a tiny red lamp on the dash board—which I saw at a depot for American accessories in Shaftesbury Avenue W.C.",
"author": "",
"title": "Two Useful Gadgets",
"source": "Indian Motor News, August 1914, p. 619",
"archive": "google",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 632,
"year": 1914,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "aviation",
"quote": "Imagine sitting outside a Dreadnought and trying to stabilise it with external gadgets, in the shape of water-ailerons worked by a lever from the bridge an da series of relay mechanisms! / Incidentally, “automatically” stable machines, consisting of aeroplanes of the present type stabilised by means of gadgets such as gyroscopes, pendula, and so forth, do not seem very promising.",
"author": "",
"title": "",
"source": "Aeroplane and Commercial Aviation News, v. 6",
"archive": "google",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 27,
"year": 1915,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "There are rival methods of achieving this end, some constructors (among them Orville Wright in America) seeking to attain it by 'automatic' and others by 'inherent' stability. The latter speak disrespectfully of the devices of the former; they call them 'gadget' stabilizers. The word is a trifle obscure, inasmuch as 'gadget' is the sea term for any miscellaneous article which does not appear to have a definite name, or at least one which comes ready at the moment. I asked a famous expert the other day to define a 'gadget stabilizer,' and he did s promptly and forcibly as 'any old thing which you hang on.' Less picturesquely an automatic stabilizer is some means of giving stability, such as a gyroscope or a pendulum, which is put to a machine, and is not in itself an essential part of its construction. / The inherent stability people maintain that by careful design and constructino alone, by theorist and practical man working side by side, by scientific disposal of weights and surfaces, different tendencies may be made to balance and correct each other, one set of oscilations to damp out another, and so the perfect machine be evolved. Further they have proved their point by succeeding. The naturally stable machine is no dream of to-morrow but the realization of to-day; not sprung upon us in a moment by some fresh epoch-making discovery, but now arrived at as the consummation of the labours which began with the earliest pioneers.",
"author": "Bacon, Gertrude",
"title": "All About Flying",
"source": "London: Methuen & Co, 34-5",
"archive": "",
"notes": "On stability as the battle cry of current aeroplane designers.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "x"
},
{
"id": 623,
"year": 1915,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "war",
"quote": "Wheels that lift and depress and swing the muzzle, and gadgets with figures on them, and other scales which play between the map and the gadgets, and atmospheric pressure and wind variation, all worked out with the same precision under a French hedge as on board a battleship where the gun-mounting is fast to massive ribs of steel--it seemed a matter of bookkeeping and trigonometry rather than war.",
"author": "Palmer, Frederick",
"title": "My Year of the Great War",
"source": "New York: Dodd, Mead & Co.",
"archive": "google",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 625,
"year": 1915,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "\"Gadget\" Law Repeal / The so-called \"gadget\" statute, providing for a specific type of license certificate containers in automobiles, should be repealed, unless you believe compliance with its…",
"author": "McDonald, William C.",
"title": "1915 Budget?",
"source": "",
"archive": "google",
"notes": "https://books.google.com/books?id=RM8PjlqDE5AC&q=gadget+OR+gadgets+OR+gadgetry&dq=gadget+OR+gadgets+OR+gadgetry&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjX0ODynMTZAhUEw4MKHbhFDrs4FBDoAQgsMAE",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 28,
"year": 1916,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "When I was a boy, I sailed over the ocean for six months without finding a single night, nothing but days all the time, until you forgot what darkness was like. Well, one night at twelve o'clock, though 'twas broad daylight, mind you, one of our crew, Martin O'Farrell, was playing 'The Boys of Wexford' on a gadget, when lo and behold! a sea serpent puts his head out of the waters and ses: 'Bravo, Martin, ses he.",
"author": "O'Brien, Seumas",
"title": "Land of Peace and Plenty",
"source": "The Whale and the Grasshopper: And Other Fables. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company. 1916",
"archive": "",
"notes": "a children's book?? seems like a stretch, just wanting to use the word as some authentic sailor dialect. ",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 29,
"year": 1916,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "",
"author": "Lodge, Sir Oliver J.",
"title": "Raymond, or Life and Death: With Examples of the Evidence for Survival of Memory and Affection After Death",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Letter from Lieutennt William Roscoe to Sir Oliver Lodge, who was a machine gun operator. A collection of letters and reminiscences of hauntings from Sir Oliver Lodge, key inventor of wireless telegraphy. See Susan J. Douglas and Jeffrey Sconce. ",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 30,
"year": 1916,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "propername",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "There seems to be, or have been, three devices for accomplishing this result, i.e.: 1st, The Churchill 'Gadget.' 2nd, The new Nesbit 'Standard' Compress. 3rd, The Webb High Density Attachment. The first (Churchill 'Gadget') does not seem to be actively offered and is apparently not a live prospect. The second (Nesbitt Press) is a new style of compress, the process of which differs somewhat from the compress in general use. They ahve one or two plants in experimental operation. The third (Webb High Density Attachment) is intended for use in connection with their regular compresses. The Webb compress is in general use and their attachment is in successful operation at a number of places.",
"author": "",
"title": "",
"source": "Proceedings of Transportation and Car Accounting Officers. Ansley Hotel, Atlanta, GA. December 12-13, 1916. p.4684",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Twenty-sixth regular meeting. On question of high density freight",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 31,
"year": 1917,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "Aviator boys of twenty and eighteen had not thought of any motto at all, but they live up to it. Their only pass words are 'gadget' and 'stunt,' they show you in delight this and that bit of machinery, and it is a 'gadget,' and they do their 'stunts'--eights and inside edges in the air, they seemed to me… […] The gadgets and stunts we have invented for our aviation and observation and photography are marvellous. Each officer shows you his own invention with a boy's delightful pride, devices for signalling, quick methods for flying camp records, codes for announcing each shell where it falls,tricks for simplifying map reading. Something like Y.12.15 sent by wireless means that a shell has burst within so many yards of such an enemy position, and in a certain direction. The precision of aeroplane photographs is wonderful. I saw those of Guillemont before and after our shelling. Before, the minute map of the village; after, a square piece of pockmarked skin; that is exactly what it looked like, with the requisite patience one could have exactly counted the shell holes.",
"author": "",
"title": "On the British Somme",
"source": "The Contemporary Review. no. 114. March, 1917",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 32,
"year": 1917,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "Every other officer has a pet mechanical originality. Marmaduke is preparing a small gravity tank for his machine, to be used when the pressure tank is ventilated by a bullet. The Tripehound has a scheme whereby all the control wires can be duplicated. Some one else has produced the latest thing in connections between the pilot's joystick and the Vicker's gun. I am making a spade-grip trigger for the Lewis gun, so that the observer can always have one hand free to manipulate the movable backsight. When one of these deathless inventions is completed the real hard work begins. The gadget is adopted unanimously by the inventor himself, but he has a tremendous task in making the rest of the squadron see its merits.",
"author": "Bott, Alan",
"title": "Cavalry of the Clouds",
"source": "186-87",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 33,
"year": 1917,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "On the way across o he hangars discovered two R.F.C. men lying on the ground trying to look like a mole-hill, and fidgeting with a gadget resembling an intoxicated lawn-mower, the use of which I have not yet discovered.",
"author": "Hutcheon, L.F.",
"title": "War Flying: By A Pilot. The Letters of 'Theta' to His Home People Written in Training and in War",
"source": "Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. 1917",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 34,
"year": 1917,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "\"I appreciate the compliment,\" began Sir William, \"that he implies to my device, but, as a matter of fact, I hardly think the apparatus is sufficiently perfect yet——\" / The Lieutenant-Commander laughed rather brutally. \"He isn't paying compliments. He went on to say he didn't want the assistance of—er—new inventions to bag a Fritz once he's sighted him.\" / The First Lieutenant came quickly to the rescue. \"Of course,\" he said, \"that's all rot. We're only too grateful to—to Science for trying to invent a new gadget…. Only, you see, sir, in the meanwhile, until you hit on it we feel we aren't doing so badly—er—just carrying on.\"",
"author": "Bartimeus",
"title": "The Long Trick",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 35,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "War tempts imaginative, restless people, and a stagnant peace bores them. And you've got to reckon with intelligence and imagination in this world, Nobby, more than anything. … INventive, restless men are the particular instruments of my Old Experimenter. Under no circumstances can you hope to induce the chap who contrived the clock fuse and the chap who worked out my gas bag or the chap with a new aeroplane gadget, and me--me, too-- to stop celebrating and making our damndest just in order to sit about safely in meadows joining up daisy chains--like a beastly lot of figures by Walter Crane.\" Gadgets as the wonderful and seductive tools produced by a wartime nation",
"author": "Wells, H.G",
"title": "Joan and Peter: The Story of an Education",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Gadgets as the wonderful and seductive tools produced by a wartime nation.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 36,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "propername",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "",
"author": "",
"title": "The Gadget, United States Naval Training Camp, Gulfport, Mississippi. for the Benefit of the Athletic Association",
"source": "Issued by The Gadget Staff. 1918. ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "yearbook",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 37,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "It [the bell punch] will clip tickets only having the proper thickness of paper. As it clips it registers the number of the operations and rings a bell. The clippings fall into a receptacle in the punch so that their numbers and their various colors can be audited with the waybill. The punch cannot be opened, for it is sealed with a paper gadget that has to be broken to open the receptacle.",
"author": "",
"title": "Zone Fare Collection As Seen by a British Tramway Manager",
"source": "Electric Railway Journal. v52n26. December 28, 1918. p. 1138",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 38,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "If the conning tower is the brain of the ship, the engine-room is its heart. When Jellicoe was speeding up to join Beatty and Evan-Thomas his whole fleet maintained a speed in excess of the trial speeds of some older vessels. Think what skilful [sic] devotion this simple fact reveals, what minute attention day in day out for months and years, so that in the hour of need no mechanical gadget may fail of its duty. And as with Jellicoe's Fleet so all through the war. Whenever the engine-rooms have been tested up to breaking strain they have always, always, stood up to the test. I think less of the splendid work done by destroyer flotillas, by combatant officers and men in th ebig ships, by all those who have manned and directed within the light cruisers. Their work was done within sight; that of the engine-rooms was hidden.",
"author": "Copplestone, Bennet",
"title": "The Silent Watchers: England's Navy During the Great War: What it is and What We Owe to It",
"source": "New York: E.P. Dutton & Company. 1918. p. 319",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 39,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "He was an engineer, in fact, -- a man who knew every nut, bolt, and gadget of his submarine, and he had a mind infinitely fertile as a resource.",
"author": "Paine, Ralph Delahaye",
"title": "The Fighting Fleets: Five Months of Active Service with the American Destroyers and their Allies in the War Zone",
"source": "Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. 1918",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 40,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "A patent gadget invented by Guns [the gunnery officer] allowed the gun-muzzles a certain amount of play up and down, play which careful calculation showed would pour a couple of streams of bullets across the end of the wood up and down a height extending to about a thousand feet, that is, 500 above and 500 below the level at which it was estimated the Huns usually flew on these night raids. It simply meant that as soon as the sound was judged to be near enough the two guns only had to open fire, to keep pouring out bullets to make sure that the Huns had to fly through the stream and 'stop one' or more. It was, in fact, a simple air barrage of machine-gun bullets.",
"author": "Cable, Boyd",
"title": "Front Lines",
"source": "New York: E.P. Dutton & Company. 1918. ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 41,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "war+list",
"quote": "On a dashboard in front of the pilot are various engine controls, comprising an independent throttle lever for each engine, a revolution counter, spark controls for both magnetos, a grease pump, gasoline regulator, and various other 'gadgets.' The flying controls do not differ in any particular way from those of the ordinary machine, the Deperdussin wheel type being adopted. Naturally, they are much more powerful, and by an ingenious system of springs worked round a small hand-winch close to the pilot's seat, the elevator can be locked in any position desired.",
"author": "Williams, Bertram W. ",
"title": "Recent Enemy Aircraft: How the Germans Make the Most of Information Obtained Through Captured Allied Planes",
"source": "Scientific American. October 5, 1918, p. 274",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 42,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "He makes change a dozen times, answers questions with a smile, hollers 'Step up in the aisle;' pulls a lever here and there regulating brakes and air. When he is prepared to go, shuts the bird-cage with his toe, moves a gadget with his knee--regulates the speed, you see--pulls the bell cord with his teeth, lest some folks get caught beneath. That would throw 'er off the track; maybe flop 'er on 'er back. Calls out names of every street, punches transfers with his feet. Thus he earns his daily pay, running cars out Summit Way.",
"author": "",
"title": "Tinkle, Tinkle, Little Car': Seattle Poet Celebrates the Safety Car in Flowing and Humorous Verse",
"source": "American Electric Railway Association. vol. 7. November, 1918.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 43,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "He also saw a bird--a great bird--on the way up, which he took to be a British eagle because it had 'large white circles on the under sides of its wings'! Sounds as though it were the now almost extinct Gadget.",
"author": "",
"title": "Proceedings of the Club",
"source": "Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal. v15n85. April 1918",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 44,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "You know, in the marines, when we can't think of a generic name for anything, we call it a 'gadget' or a 'gilguy.' Now, this man has won two Congressional Medals and has another coming. When we sighted the French coast, I was standing, where he could n't see me, just behind him; and I heard him say: 'I got two o' them gadgets now, an' one on its way. I wonder if I'll get another over here.",
"author": "Kauffman, Reginald Wright",
"title": "The American Marines",
"source": "The Living Age. no. 3861. July 6, 1918, p.47",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 45,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "nautical+definition",
"quote": "But what I should like to know is, what the deuce is a doo-hickie?' 'A doo-hickie?' replied the squadron commander. 'A doo-hickie? H'm'm. George, how would you describe a doo-hickie?' The officer appealed to puffed his pipe in silence for a moment [sic]. 'Well,' he said at length, 'you know more or less what a gadget's like?' 'Yes.' 'And a gilguy?' 'Yes.' 'Well, a doo-hickie is something like that, only smaller as a rule.' […] The Stranger within the Gates of the Navy-that-Flies had the drink, and from then onwards forebore to ask any more questions. But he still sometimes wonders what the functions of a doo-hickie might be.",
"author": "Bartimeus",
"title": "The Navy Eternal: Which is The Navy-That-Floats, The Navy-That-Flies, and The Navy-Under-The-Sea",
"source": "New York: George H. Doran Company. 1918 p. 100",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 46,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "nautical+definition+british",
"quote": "A discussion arose at the Plymouth meeting of the Devonshire Association in 1916 when it was suggested that this word should be recorded in the list of local verbal provincialisms. Several members dissented from its inclusion on the ground that it is in common use throughout the country and a naval officer who was present said that it has for years been a popular expression in the service for a tool or implement, the exact name of which is unknown or has for the moment been forgotten. I have also frequently heard it applied by motor-cycle friends to the collection of fitments to be seen on motor cycles. 'His handle-bars are smothered in gadgets' refers to such things as speedometers, mirrors, levers, badges, mascots, &c., attached to the steering handles\". / 'Gadget' is a colloquialism in the Navy for any small fitment or uncommon article--for example, 'a curious gadget.' I never came across anybody who could give a derivation.\" -A.G. Kealy / \"In a list of words and phrases used by our soldiers at the Front, sent to me recently from Flanders, there is the word 'gadget,' and its meaning is given as billets or quarters of any description, 'and sometimes it is used to denote a thing of which the name is not known.'\" --Archibald Sparke. / 'Webster's New International Dictionary' says that 'gadget' is often used of something novel, or not known by its proper name (slang).' It is a word in frequent use in this sense by seamen and other workers.\" --F.A. Russell",
"author": "Tapley-Soper",
"title": "Notes and Queries",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 47,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "GADGET, dispositif (m) [servant à un usage quelconque.",
"author": "de Gramont, Armand Antoine Agénor",
"title": "The Aviator's Pocket Dictionary and Table-Book, French-English and English-French",
"source": "New York: Brentano's. 1918",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 556,
"year": 1918,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "nautical+definition+british",
"quote": "A discussion arose at the Plymouth meeting of the Devonshire Association in 1916 when it was suggested that this word should be recorded in the list of local verbal provincialisms. Several members dissented from its inclusion on the ground that it is in common use throughout the country and a naval officer who was present said that it has for years been a popular expression in the service for a tool or implement, the exact name of which is unknown or has for the moment been forgotten. I have also frequently heard it applied by motor-cycle friends to the collection of fitments to be seen on motor cycles. 'His handle-bars are smothered in gadgets' refers to such things as speedometers, mirrors, levers, badges, mascots, &c., attached to the steering handles\". / 'Gadget' is a colloquialism in the Navy for any small fitment or uncommon article--for example, 'a curious gadget.' I never came across anybody who could give a derivation.\" -A.G. Kealy / \"In a list of words and phrases used by our soldiers at the Front, sent to me recently from Flanders, there is the word 'gadget,' and its meaning is given as billets or quarters of any description, 'and sometimes it is used to denote a thing of which the name is not known.'\" --Archibald Sparke. / 'Webster's New International Dictionary' says that 'gadget' is often used of something novel, or not known by its proper name (slang).' It is a word in frequent use in this sense by seamen and other workers.\" --F.A. Russell",
"author": "Tapley-Soper",
"title": "Notes and Queries",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 48,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "lit",
"quote": "There she was. And there he was. In fact, putting it another way, there they both were. And now jolly well what? Archie rested his left ear against the forearm of a long, strongly built young man in a gray suit who had followed him into the car and was sharing his strap, and pondered. / Of course, in a way, the gadget was simple. The wheeze was, in a sense, straightforward and uncomplicated. What he wanted to do was to point out to the injured girl all that hung on her. He wished to touch her heart, to plead with her, to desire her to restate her war-aims, and to persuade her--before three o'clock, when that stricken gentleman would be stepping into the pitcher's box to loose off the first ball against the Pirates--to let bygones be bygones and forgive Augustus Biddle.",
"author": "Wodehouse, P.G.",
"title": "First Aid for Loony Biddle",
"source": "Cosmopolitan. v69n6. December, 1920",
"archive": "",
"notes": "gadget as plan or ruse",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 49,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "trivial+british",
"quote": "But the Rolls-Royce Company would never pay big dividends upon the patronage or custom of the minority who buy their cars as toys--to play with all the intriguing little gadgets with which they are fitted.\" (124) / \"The motor car trade is a 'fashion' trade, just as much as ladies' hats, and if there is a desire for taper bonnets or pointed radiators, or any of the many gadgets we have to fit, it is necessary to conform to that desire, or else the car is difficult to sell.\" (140) / IN THE RETORT/CONVERSATION: \"The author cannot seriously suggest that the gadgets designed into the majority of cars, especially the high-priced types, are undesirable fads. That would be an insult to the intelligence of their sponsors, who are presumably men who know their jobs both on the technical and financial side. Any gadgets embodied in a design are, rightly or wrongly, provided for a specific purpose and achieve some refinement which a competitor's car does not possess. I say rightly or wrongly, as they do not always fulfil [sic] expectation.\" (143) / \"I really cannot help wondering whether all the gadgets on those big, magnificent cars we aw at Olympia are really necessary, when I can get equal or greater comfort, smoothness and quietness without them. IT is very nice, of course, to be able to sit back in a chair and adjust the petrol-feed of the carburettor to such a degree that the mixture can be gradually varied while under way. It is beautiful for the man who wants to do it, but the very man who buys a GBP 2,000 car does not do it.\" (148) / \"The man who can afford GBP2,000 for a chassis , who can afford all the gadgets in the world, and who sits in the car while his man does the rest, does not care how many gadgets the car is fitted with, so long as he gets from his house to his office in time.\" (157) / \"As a designer I object to exaggerated smoothness of design, and though at a Motor Show clean outline may look charming, I feel that external smoothness can be overdone. The question of suiting the springing of a car to the load in the car has always been rather a fancy of mine, and although it is an extra gadget I think it will shortly be fitted on a number of cars. I do not say it is a good thing on every car, but there are plenty of people who will appreciate a device which will ensure equally good suspension, whether the car is light or loaded. […] As far as other gadgets go, such as controllable carburettors, I must say I do feel that if the owner drives his car--and we are always being told that owners will drive, and not have chauffeurs--he will appreciate them. A water circulation thermometer is a 'gadget,' but I find it very useful.",
"author": "Duffield, Edgar",
"title": "Car Design and Car Usage: A Plea for the Fuller Appreciation by Car Designers of the LImited Mechanical Knowledge and Engineering Sense of Those who Buy Cars, Together With Some Notes of a Few Directions in Which Design Should be Modified With Advantage Equally to Manufacturer and User",
"source": "Proceedings of the Institution of Automobile Engineers. vol. 14. 1919",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Over and against \"lazy\" users who never fill up their cars with lubricant or cooling water, or know anything about the machine or maintain it. Interestingly, the rebuttal does not say, \"these are not gadgets,\" i.e. these features are not trivial or mere fashion, but that \"gadgets\" achieve a specific purpose and refinement in the design. In this article, we are debating the very usage of the term gadget--is it trivial, or a vital element of good design? Is it truly useful, or merely a distraction or window dressing? Gadget not used just for the gauge or mechanism added on, but for the operation or function itself--i.e. suiting the springing of a car to the weight in that car is a \"gadget.\" ",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 50,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "natural",
"quote": "As an addition to a set of mathematical instruments the gadget shown in Fig. 2 forms a useful adjunct. The pin Z is arranged to fit into leg of the compass such that the center point of the compass and points X and Y all lie in the same straight line.",
"author": "Lind, Wallace L. ",
"title": "Professional Notes: Navigation and Radio",
"source": " United States Naval Institute Proceedings. v45n9. September, 1919",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 51,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "The distortion of the 'field section' or 'field sheet' due to changes of humidity and temperature, has been a thorn in the side of the topographer for many years, neither does there appear to be any means of eliminating it as long as the field sheet is of paper, or Bristol board, mounted upon a wooden board. […] Indeed the feeling of many topographers is averse to the introduction of anything in the nature of a 'gadget.' In those countries where most of our plant table work is done breakdowns may be fatal. Experiment has proved, however, that a simple but ingenious arrangement can be fitted to the existing pattern of legs which provides a slow motion, thrown in or out of action by a cam, and detachable at will. It was tried in 1914 and unanimously approved of.",
"author": "Winterbotham, H. St. J. L.",
"title": "Plane Tables and Field Sheets",
"source": "Engineering and Contracting. vol. 64, issue 4. December 31, 1919",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 52,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "To-day, when she was wanted worst, the dory was perversely more out of kilter than usual and lay sprawled on the mid-deck, opposite the engine-room hatch, with Kennedy inside and tinkering inquisitively, unscrewing nuts, looking at carburetors, examining spark plugs, and testing aim-pump valves or any other gadget that might possibly have been the seat of such cantankerous misbehavior.",
"author": "Macfarlane, Peter Clark",
"title": "The Exploits of Bilge and Ma",
"source": "Boston: Little, Brown, and Company. 1919",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 53,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "In order to make possible the translation of this specimen of 'Flyese,' our British contemporary, Flying, has published the following list of aeronautic slang phrases, with which some of our airmen are no doubt familiar. … Gadget -- Accessory, fitting, anything difficult to remember or define. Super-gadget -- The latest thing in fittings. ",
"author": "Edwards, R. Stanley",
"title": "Aeronitis",
"source": "Aerial Age Weekly. July 21, 1919",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 54,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "he would turn up suddenly, by air or road, with an oily old raincoat, a long lurching stride, a deep voice, a noisy laugh and a tentative unsymmetrical smile half-hidden by a large grey-brown moustache: and would proceed at once to 'touch off' a rocket, to fire incendiary bullets into a gas-bag or a petrol-tin, to inspect some new 'gadget' for a machine-gun, or to practise some other of the many strange arts of which Orfordness was the home.",
"author": "",
"title": "Colonel Bertram Hopkinson -- An Appreciation",
"source": "The Alpine Journal. no. 219. June 1919. p. 353",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 55,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "We don't let' em see, neither, if we can 'elp it. Once or twice Turkish (mime' ve seen us at play, but they only laughs. They 'ates the Huns a blurry sight more 'n we do. Why, I remember when a coupler Turks' elped us in the good work one mornin'. \" \" Guns an' aererplanes is' andiest, \" he continued, reflectively. \" Yer see, when we finds the breech-block uv a gun it don't take long to take aht some gadget er other, accordin' as the gunners with us sez. Aererplanes we attacks mostly on the longeerongs? those ribs o' wood that runs claim the length of the body, ain't they? English pilot' oo passed dahn the line some months ergo give us the tip.' Corse, we gives the other parts a bit uv attention? wires an' spars, an' such like.... No, it don't seem likely that those things over there'll fly fer.",
"author": "Bott, Alan",
"title": "Eastern Nights––and Flights",
"source": "Harpers. September 1919. pp. 563-571",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 56,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "One of the city departments require, let us say, five gross of woven wire gadgets--gadgets in this case meaning anything you may be pleased to imagine. Upon request of this request, the Division of Purchases sends a copy of the requisition to each gadget house in the city, as shown by the division's mailing lists, and requests quotations.",
"author": "",
"title": "Selling to Toledo: A Big Market That Should Interest Sellers of Many Lines of Goods",
"source": "The Toledo City Journal. v4n5, Feb. 1 1919",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 57,
"year": 1919,
"decade": 1910,
"primary": "",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "As a born Cockney, living close to London every minute of my life, I had not noticed the slow change in the face and soul of London. […] The young men having gone to war, the streets were filled with middle-aged women of thirty, in short skirts, trying to attract the aged satyrs, the only men that remained, by pretending to be little girls. […] The common Cockney seemed to walk almost fearfully about his invaded streets, hardly daring to be himself or talk his own language. apart from the foreign tongues, which always did annoy his ear, foul language now assailed him from every side: 'no bon,' 'napoo,' 'gadget,' 'camouflaged,' 'buckshee,' 'bonza,' and so on. This is not good slang. Good slang has a quality of its own--a bite and spit and fine expressiveness which do not belong to dictionary words. That is its justification--the supplying of a lacking shade of expression, not the supplanting of adequate forms. The old Cockney slang did justify itself, but this modern army rubbish, besides being uncouth, is utterly meaningless, and might have been invented by some idiot schoolboy: probably was.",
"author": "Burke, Thomas",
"title": "Out and About London",
"source": "p. 8-9",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 58,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "They call out the seconds and she begins to porpoise, and at zero out of water goes her periscope again and the Herr Kapitan has another look, and it's a sure bet then he's all set to blow up the works. He whistles to the guy Fred to be ready and Fred fixes his eyes on a gadget that shows red and green lights when it flashes. And the diving rudder man stands about an ninch [sic] closer to his little wheel, meaning he's all set too.",
"author": "Connolly, James Brendan",
"title": "Hiker Joy",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "submarine sighting in on a ship to torpedo",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 59,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "british+lit",
"quote": "Damn!' said Freddie softly, and hurried off down the street. He wondered whether he had made a frightful ass of himself, spraying bank-notes all over the place like that to comparative strangers. Then a vision came to him of Nelly's eyes as they had looked at him in the lamp-light, and he decided--no, absolutely not. Rummy as the gadget might appear, it had been the right thing to do. It was a binge of which he thoroughly approved. A good egg!",
"author": "Wodehouse, P.G.",
"title": "The Little Warrior",
"source": "p. 117",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 60,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "I wish the guy that invented this solitaire gadget was cooped up with us,' he grumbled to himself. 'I'd treat him rough. This is the night for her to come through. King on a jack and I'm ditched again, by cripes.",
"author": "Paine, Ralph Delahaye",
"title": "Ships Across the Sea: Stories of the American Navy in the Great War.",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 61,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "And the younger duck generation / Should all be taught to use / Some muffler apparatus, / To save them from abuse. / There's 'gadget' used on roosters / That will stop the 'morning crow;' / If Burt can adapt it to his ducks, / Hearty thanks to him will go!",
"author": "P.J.S.",
"title": "Just 'Ducks'",
"source": "The Mentor: Massachusetts State Prison. v21n2. December 1920",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 62,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "Stick them on that shelf,' said Jude. 'Oh, Lord!--butter-fingers!--lemme! That's the gadget to keep them from shiftin' if the ship rolls. Now stick the knives in that locker. You don't mind my tellin' you, do you?",
"author": "Stacpoole, Henry De Vere",
"title": "Satan: A Romance of the Bahamas",
"source": "p. 47",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 63,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "I've got the stuff wired up, Luke,' he said, 'and the whole gadget timed according to instructions; but hte detonators have to be fixed yet. It's not a show that wants monkeying with until its [sic] needed. […] If the game looks in the least like being blown upon, this gadget of yours wipes out the barge and all evidence that can speak or bear witness.",
"author": "Goodwin, John",
"title": "Without Mercy",
"source": "New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. 1920",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 64,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "You make me smile. Upon getting under way what special entry must be made in the ship's log? Likewise and also, what is a Polyconic Projection? Snap it out, now!' / 'Your poor simp! I'm the man that invented that gadget. ON the level, there's only one question on the whole list that you are sure of.",
"author": "Paine, Ralph Delahaye",
"title": "The Corsair in the War Zone",
"source": "Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin. 1920",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 65,
"year": 1920,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Look for another match!' I cried to Davis, and although he knew he had no more, he began to throw things out of his pockets right and left. Among these things there fell a smudge cigarette lighter. These instruments were devised by the French on account of their extreme shortage of matches. The gadget consists of a tiny steel wheel, which strikes a piece of flint, which in turn ignites the smudge. The only trouble with these things is that they do not always work.",
"author": "Haslett, Elmer",
"title": "Down and Out and In",
"source": "Luck on the Wing: Thirteen Stories of a Sky Spy. 1920. p. 182-3",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 66,
"year": 1921,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "apparatus",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "There were several earlier types which, although they had their defects, were very effective and frequently 'spotted' the Kaiser's subs at distances of several miles and aided our sub-chasers in running them down and giving them the spurlos versenkt with one of our neat little ash cans. The more modern apparatus upon which I personally worked was not perfected in time to have actual service overseas. This remarkable 'gadget,' which is known as the multi-unit or M.V. Type of hydrophone, consists in general of two lines of twelve equally spaced microphones. They are mounted -- one on each side -- below the water line and either beneath a protective 'blister' outside the skin of the vessel or sometimes within the forward water tank.",
"author": "",
"title": "News from the Classes",
"source": "The Technology Review. v23n3. July, 1921",
"archive": "",
"notes": "tool but more of a complex system, a collection of elements that make up this tool, not a small portable implement",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 67,
"year": 1921,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "You see, it was standin' against one bulkhead--against a wall, I mean, about--about amidships I should say of the room. It was as big as me; a big, black, shiny safe, and there was a keyhole in the door covered by a little nickel gadget about as big as--as a dollar.",
"author": "Levison, Eric",
"title": "Ashes of Evidence",
"source": "Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company. 1921. p. 329",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 68,
"year": 1921,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "We will suppose that a factory is of just medium size and that it is governed by a General Manager and a Superintendent. Also, that it has a Statistical Department and the usual number of factory departments with a foreman in charge of each. The product is a small machine, which we will call a gadget, and it is composed of a few castings, which are purchased from an outside foundry, some commerical parts, and some parts which are made in the various departments. The factory has been turning out about thirty machines a day, but, it is desired to increase this output to forty.",
"author": "",
"title": "The 'Exception Principle' in Management",
"source": "Engineering and Contracting. Novemer 23, 1921",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 69,
"year": 1921,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Lately I have devised more sightly and lighter arrangements for protecting the nails. One useful gadget is to pull over each nail a short piece of black indiarubber tubing of suitable diameter. This affords good protection. Another contrivance I have used is a small metal clip to pinch round the nail, and this is very effective.",
"author": "Livcsey, G.H.",
"title": "Common Nervous Diseases of the Dog",
"source": "Veterinary Medicine. v16n10. October, 1921.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 70,
"year": 1921,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "But I want you to smash 'em through the ice,' went on Bret. 'And I think we can rig a gadget that will do it. If the donkey-crane isn't high enough--how about using a Jim-pole to lift the logs up and chuck them into the river, instead of hauling them out on the bank?' […] 'Chuck 'em out on the ice from a Jim-pole sling, twenty feet high, and it will smash the ice up, won't it?' 'I'll say so--if we can rig the gadget.'",
"author": "Perry, Clay",
"title": "Roving River",
"source": "Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Company. 1921. p. 72-3",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 71,
"year": 1921,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "And even then I was forced to stretch one leg out so far that I kicked a little gadget on a box arrangement on the dashboard, which apparently stopped the engine.\" [george blames it on him, says he did it on purpose.] \"As if I, with no mechanical instinct whatever, knew what was in that box! I don't know even now, and I have got my driver's license.",
"author": "Benchley, Robert",
"title": "Of All Things",
"source": "New York: Henry Holt and Company. 1921. p. 54",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 72,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "raygun",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "In fact, sir, you want an apparatus combining a variety of qualities, in a word, an absolutely silent, efficient, economical, invisible, corrosive proof, unornamented, not-too-heavily-springed, easily adjusted, readily removable, British-made, right-handed, patent automatic door closer, ideally fitted in every possible respect for attaching to your pantry door which (I understand you say) contains a glass window. How is that, sir?' 'Splendid, splendid.' 'Well, sir, I regret that there has never been any article of that description put on the market, but if you care to visit our wholesale department across the road, you may perhaps be able to make your choice from a reasonably large selection of our present imperfect models. Good day, sir.",
"author": "Graves, Robert",
"title": "The Fable of the Ideal Gadget.",
"source": "On English Poetry: Being an Irregular Approach to the Psychology of This Art, from Evidence Mainly Subjective. p. 110",
"archive": "",
"notes": "A fable about how each poem is begun with an ideal to its perfection, edited countless times, until \"the inevitable sense of failure is felt, leaving him at liberty to try again.\"",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 73,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "…and Joe Squibb, alias Paul, own the right to his designation of Sea-going Gadget",
"author": "Loomis, Alfred Fullerton",
"title": "The Cruise of the Hippocampus",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "as a nickname",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 74,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "apparatus",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "“Geoffrey has actually torn himself away from his horrible old wireless,” Sylvia remarked. “For nearly a fortnight we’ve hardly seen him.” / “I’ve been awfully busy on a new gadget,” the young man replied with a laugh. Then, turning to May, he added: “Sylvia is always poking fun at me because I happen to be enthusiastic over my work.”",
"author": "Le Queux, William",
"title": "Tracked By Wireless: Which Recounts Some of the Exciting Adventures of Geoffrey Falconer, Radio Experimenter",
"source": "London: Stanley Paul & Co. p. 174",
"archive": "",
"notes": "FIND THIS. Working on a device that will automatically pick up a particular telegraphic signal and transcribe it on a roll of paper. ",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 75,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The multiplied troubles of the radio operator on board ship, and persistent complaints to the superintendent, have hurried the development of the break-key. The name was a misfit for early devices with their multitude of levers, wires and contacts. The delicacy of the equipment was responsible for periodic instruction from the company engineers not to tamper with the outfit. / The 'gadget,' as it was disrespectfully called, sputtered and flashed at the contacts, and the noises circulating in the telephones further tried the patience of the operator. Messages were received with uncertainty and traffic was frequently congested.",
"author": "Winters, S.R.",
"title": "An Ingenious 'Break-In Key': A New Time-Saving Device That Enables the Operator at the Transmitting Station To Listen-In on the Receiving Station While He is Carrying on Communication.",
"source": "Popular Radio. September, 1922. v2n1",
"archive": "",
"notes": "for messages transmitted and received aboard sea-going vessels",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 76,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Somehow or other I can't get on to this radio a little bit. When you get that sending outfit rigged you'll have to go down and test it. I'd probably bungle something. I didn't even dare meddle with this gadget for tuning. I tried it once and when your voice stopped I just shoved her back and let it go at that.",
"author": "Verrill, A. Hyatt ",
"title": "The Radio Detectives",
"source": "D. Appleton and Company: 1922",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 77,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Casey awoke under the vivid impression that some one was driving a gadget into his skull with a 'double-jack.'",
"author": "Bower, B.M.",
"title": "The Trail of the White Mule",
"source": "p. 101",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 78,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Now, of course there's no reason why a Russian should not use a German sub if he could get hold of it, but what were they doing over here in the East River is what gets me. I don't believe they were just rum-runners, even if Murphy and his crowd did find a lot of booze over there, and what was that cigar-shaped sub-sea gadget they were pulling along with 'em?' 'Why, I think that's all simple,' declared Tom. 'They probably brought liquor in here with the submarine and carried it to the garage in that torpedolike thing.'",
"author": "Verrill, A. Hyatt",
"title": "The Radio Detectives",
"source": "D. Appleton and Company: 1922",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 79,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "need",
"secondary": "trivial+nautical",
"quote": "I think that many an officer, when he first studies the mooring board at the Naval Academy, or rather when he is supposed to study it, is at once impressed with its resemblance to a huge spider web, contrived by the devilish ingenuity of man for the purpose of hopelessly enmeshing the poor fly--which is himself. […] In either case, if the ship has to shift berth, the tendency is to damn the mooring board as an impracticable 'gadget,' and to fail to criticize the manner of its use. Thus when it comes to a consideration of the less obvious manuvering problems, he is prone to dismiss the whole matter with the assertion tha, like the Peace of God, it 'passeth all understanding.' […] When speaking of mooring board problems, I think not so much of the board itself as of the kind of work involved. Such problems may be worked out on the actual board, or in many cases on a chart, or perhaps on some kind of specially contrived 'gadget.' […] I have a gadget I use for maneuvering problems instead of the printed forms, locally known as the 'Wegee Board,' because it is supposed to predict the future and explain the past. It is a sheet of white celluloid with an 18\"circle on it graduated in degrees. At the center is the point of a thumb tack inserted from the bottom side and filed down till it barely projects above the board.",
"author": "Stiles, Commander William C.I",
"title": "Some Uses and Misuses of the Mooring Board",
"source": " v48n7. July 1922.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 80,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Finally, there is the 'gadget,' which is employed when insufficient fall [gravitational momentum] is available, in order to push the packages along.\" (209) \"The 'Gadget.' -- A 'gadget' is illustrated in Figs. 302 to 304 (Rownson, Drew, & Clydesdale's patent). This device comes into play principally when a sufficient gradient for a gravity runway is unobtainable, and where, therefore, a very slight incline or even a level path, has to be chosen. A 'gadget' may likewise be used for an uphill gradient for stacking purposes (see Fig. 305), or it may take the place of a 'humper'; generally speaking, a 'gadget' will push a steady stream of cases for about 200 ft. on a level path. This device is made 8 ft. long in order that it may replace an 8-ft. section of a runway without necessitiating any rearrangement of the rest of the lay-out. The machine consists of an angle frame which may stand on a level floor in case of a stationary installation, or may be mounted on wheels for a portable lay-out; it totally elcloses the elctro-motor and the propelling device. […] It would not be practicable for the 'gadget' to push cases round the corner; the path must always be in a straight line. If angles have to be negotiated, this must be done on a gravity run after the cases leave, independently of the pushing influence of the 'gadget.'",
"author": "Zimmer, George Frederick",
"title": "he Mechanical Handling and Storing of Material: Being a Treatise on the Automatic and Semi-Automatic Handling and Storing of Commericial Products.",
"source": "p. 213-215",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 81,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Now here is a little gadget which should be in every home--I mean plotting room. It is small and inexpensive, if your [sic] don't have to make or buy it yourself, and helps out the plotter like a brother should--but doesn't",
"author": "Bunker, Major Paul D",
"title": "A Range Corrector",
"source": "The Coast Artillery Journal. v57n4. October, 1922",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 82,
"year": 1922,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "mini",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "AFFUTIAU, sb. m. 1. trinket, article of adornment. Les jeunes filles aiment les affutiaux, girls are fond of titivating. Des affutiaux comme en aiment les jeunes paysannes, just the sort of fal-lals peasent girls like. 2. Thing, gadget. Je ne sais plus le nom de cet affutiau, I don't remember the name of that gadget.",
"author": "Leroy, Oliver",
"title": "",
"source": "Leroy, Oliver",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 83,
"year": 1923,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "dinkus, n. Thing. Also Doodinkus, Doodad, Dinglebob, Jigger, Thingumbob, Gadget.",
"author": "Taylor, J.L.B. ",
"title": "Snake County Talk",
"source": "Dialect Notes: Publications of the American Dialect Society. vol. 5 part 6. 1923",
"archive": "",
"notes": "\"Snake County\" is the name, before 1849, and some time thereafter as a nickname, for McDonald County, Missouri. ",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 84,
"year": 1923,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "The addition of a fifteenth instrument without doubt gives the car that possesses it a modicum of greater luxury than is enjoyed by the driver with but 14 assorted gadgets at his disposal. But we would rather have the presence of a large variety of non-essentials on the dash regarded as a matter of minor interest--of interest undoubtedly, but not of such paramount importance as to be worth a whole page of ecstasy at current advertising rates.",
"author": "",
"title": "Inventions New and Interesting",
"source": "Scientific American 128, (February 1923), p. 115-118 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Subsection: \"A cigar-lighter for the chauffeur.\" ",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 85,
"year": 1923,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "trivial+british",
"quote": "It would be more than folly to think that it is necessary to produce a freak design, or to plaster the chassis with gadgets, just because an attempt is being made to reach a market in which the conditions are so very different from those at home.",
"author": "Acres, F.A. Stepney",
"title": "The Requirements of the Colonial Market",
"source": " Proceedings of the Institution of Automobile Engineers. v. 18. 1923. p. 626",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 86,
"year": 1923,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Somebody has suggested that the installation of thermostats, shutters, etc., is a confession of weakness; that a properly designed cooling plant ought to cool the car without the necessity for tinkering with it to meet the vagaries of the weather. The fact is, of course, that overcooling is just as objectionable as constant boiling; and that the only way in which a proper mean can be maintained is by a system that modifies its cooling capacity according to the weather. At the same time, the thing can be carried to an unnecessary degree of fineness. During the season when thermostats are busy and shutters working overtime, while those who do not possess these gadgets fall back mainly upon the use of newspaper and cardboard shields over the lower part of their radiators, the driver whose front-end design makes it possible for him to slip off his fan belt will be able to achieve much the same result in this way, and with a saving of power.",
"author": "",
"title": "Automobile Notes",
"source": "Scientific American 128, 139-146 (February 1923)",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 87,
"year": 1923,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "It is inexcusable folly to have something go wrong 50 miles from nowhere, and then wish vainly that you had purchased some badly needed gadget before you started. A collapsible bucket, for example, is almost indispensable if the engine overheats and the water boils away. An extra gallon or so of oil and five gallons of gasoline are other factors of safety.",
"author": "",
"title": "Gypsying de Luxe by Auto: Whole Nation is Playground for Summer Tourists; How to Make the Auto Trip Successful",
"source": "Popular Science, July 1923, p. 69",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 88,
"year": 1924,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "definition+british+naval",
"quote": "Gadgets (cxlvii. 427).--In J. Manchon's 'Le Slang' (Paris, 1923) I find: Gadget, s. lo N[autique] toute pièce de machine; 2º F[amilier] employé à la place d'un mot qu'on ne trouve pas: chose, machin, truc; M[ilitaire] une chose quelconque [an unspecified thing], le système, l'affaire (à faire, à avoir, à réussir): the gadget is to barge in on the Chief fright away, at the double. La chose à faire c'est de rentrer tout de suite dans le patron et au pas d'gym [d'oum?]. See also 12 S. iv. 187, 281. --John B. Wainewright. / Professor Ernest Weekley, in 'A Concise Etymological Dictionary of Modern English,' deals with this word thus: 'Gadget [neol.]..? From gadge, early Scottish form of gauge. --H. ASkew. / Spennymoor. I am told that this word has a naval origin and was, and is, used to signify any piece of loose tackle.\"",
"author": "",
"title": "Gadgets",
"source": "Notes and Queries, 1925; CXLVIII: 15",
"archive": "",
"notes": "in Notes and Queries (Notes and Queries, 1924; CXLVII: 427): Gadgets--I should like to know where the above word came from. It is used when speaking of small luxuries or improvements in motor cars, such as a new speed recorder; new level to show the height of ascent; a new method of showing license, etc., etc. -M.V.D. Which was answered in the subsequent issue Notes and Queries",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 89,
"year": 1924,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "A Handy Gadget for the Magazine Subscriber. How do you remove the wrappers from tightly rolled newspapers or magazines? […] The problem has been solved by a cutter devised by Arthur F. Hoffman, a rural mail carrier at Harvard, Neb., recently submitted to the Post Office Department and approved by the Postal authorities. The cutter is in the form of a knife with a curved and flattened tip. The flat point is easily inserted underneath the wrapper and a forward movement of the instrument results in clean cutting of the covering without damage to the contents.",
"author": "",
"title": "Inventions New and Interesting",
"source": "Scientific American 130, (June 1924), p. 405-409 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 90,
"year": 1924,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The painter of houses has always been puzzled for a way to plant his ladder against the side of the house without making a mark on the freshly laid paint. A way to accomplish this is now offered him in the ingenious ladder-support illustrated. On each upright of the ladder, near the tip, is clamped a curved brace, the other end of which is pointed. These two points, one on either side of the ladder, furnish the bearing points for the ladder. […] and they offer an extraordinarily convenient place from which to suspend the paint pot.",
"author": "",
"title": "New Gadget for the House-Painter",
"source": "Scientific American 130, (March 1924) p. 175-175 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 91,
"year": 1924,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "Handy Gadgets for the Amateur Gardener. All those who have gardens know the fatigue pursuant to kneeling when any operation is required near the surface of the ground. From England we have a kneeling mat which seems to solve the problem very effectually. It is made of rush or straw and the bottom is water-proofed so that the damp and dew will not strike through. These pads are very extensively used in England.",
"author": "",
"title": "Inventions New and Interesting",
"source": "Scientific American 131, (July 1924), p. 37-42 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 470,
"year": 1924,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "His remarkable youth at 93 is only a fitting crown to an absorbing Use. Lord Mayo, one of India's Viceroys, was for years his closest friend. He knew Charles Dickens Intimately as a young man, and among his acquaintances were Thackeray. Landseer and almost every one of note in the artistic world of the period. It is a. period he has outlived but still has hardly time to regret, for in addition to keeping abreast of the engineering world today, attending to his business as Chairman of the Southern Punjab Railway, Inventing new \" gadgets \" from time to time and interesting himself in the pure food problem. Sir Bradford has at last started to write his reminiscences.",
"author": "Bourbon, Diana",
"title": "\"Aged Empire Builder is an Almost American\"",
"source": "New York Times: (Features): 19241123",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 92,
"year": 1925,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The famous Handley Page slotted wing, shown diagrammatically in our sketch, when open actually increases the maximum lift between fifty and seventy percent! Its incorporation involves many mechanical difficulties, and aeronautical engineers always like to leave their wings free of all 'gadgets' or complications. Nevertheless, this tremendous increase in lift may very well be utilized one day either to diminish landing speeds or to increase the carrying capacity of our planes.",
"author": "Klemin, Alexander",
"title": "Learning to Use Our Wings",
"source": "Scientific American 132, (April 1925), p. 269-274 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 93,
"year": 1926,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "Trucks Make Their Own Fuel. The accompanying photographs, showing a method of generating fuel gas for motor vehicles from charcoal, which has been rather extensively tried out in France, illustrates, to our mind, a tendency which has been apparent in Europe since the World War--a tendency to attempt to accomplish by complicated methods what is already being accomplished through simple means. […] The apparatus consists of a generating chamber having a grate, firebox and boiler for producing the necessary steam for making the gas. It appears to be an amazing complication of internal 'gadgets.' The gas must be scrubbed, filtered to remove particles of charcoal, and further purified in a centrifugal purifier. There are a number of other details which it seems unnecessary to mention here.",
"author": "Ingalls, Albert G.",
"title": "The Scientific American Digest",
"source": "Scientific American 134, (January 1926) p. 42-46",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 94,
"year": 1926,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Well, gimme the works, and I'll show you how it's done [wiring a \"spotlight\" to the car], and then when you buy a cigar lighter or some other gadget in another town, where they haven't a good-natured garageman to wire it for you, you can do the job yourself.",
"author": "",
"title": "Connecting Electric Accessories on the Automobile",
"source": " Popular Mechanics, jan 1926, p. 147.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 441,
"year": 1926,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "people expected a big novel from burly young Author Hemingway. His short work (In Ou Time, 1925) bit deeply into life. He said things naturally, calmly tersely, accurately. He wrote only; about things he had experienced mostly outdoors, as a doctor's son in northern Michigan and as a self-possessed young tramp in Europe. Philosophically his implication was: \" Life's great. Don't let it rattle you. \" 141029 The gadget in a railroad official's office car which is most likely to get out of order is the speedometer, whose clock face is usually perched just above and in front of the official as he sits in his accustomed chair before the starboard rear observation window. Nevertheless, last week the Boston &; Maine joined the current race to lure passengers with gimcracks when it installed a speedometer in the solarium of its crack, streamlined Flying Yankee. Developed by Waltham Watch Co., the instrument is actuated by a small electric",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Sad Young Men\"",
"source": "Time Magazine, November 1",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 95,
"year": 1927,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "vehicle",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "",
"author": "Green, Fitzhugh",
"title": "Black Death: A Naval Officer's Vivid Story Revealing Inside Workings of a Submarine",
"source": "Popular Science, June 1927.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "\"gadget\" is a \"cylinder\" invented by a Doctor aboard the ship which can send several men up to the surface while withstanding the water pressure at those depths (no mention of the bends). Here the word names an entire craft.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 96,
"year": 1927,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "All I've got to do,' he would explain, 'is to figure out a way to shift this 'dooflapper.' When I get this 'dooflapper' so it will topple this little lever and let it drop this gadget into this groove here, this wheel will turn over and release this other lever, and I'll be all right. Then this other cog will flop up and catch this other gadget, and I'll have perpetual motion, you bet!'",
"author": "",
"title": "The Rotarian: A Magazine of Service",
"source": "Rotary International. September 1927",
"archive": "",
"notes": "gadget names an individual part of a mechanism, a cog, etc.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 97,
"year": 1927,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "A College Professor Solves a Mathematical Problem and Becomes a Wealthy Inventor. Most of us are likely to think of an inventor as eagerly seeking some idea upon which to exercise his genius, and then bending over a work bench surrounded with wheels, wires and miscellaneous gadgets trying first this combination and then that until he works out his invention. / He gets his patent and makes the rounds of manu­facturers, all save one of whom laugh at his radical ideas, but that one sees something in it and makes a fortune. / The other day we were talking with an inventor who is not like that at all. He never thought of himself as an inventor, never looked for anything to invent, never had any intention of making a lot of money, believes he is weak in imagination-that quality so often considered necessary to success­ful invention-has put in far more time writing a book than he has done in inventing, has done his in­ venting only as a sort of side line and never bothered ped­dling an invention around among manufacturers. All the inventing he does is with a pen and a note book. And yet Louis Alan Hazeltine has made a fortune out of his inventions. The best known of them, of course, is the Neu­trodyne radio receiver.",
"author": "Wright, Milton",
"title": "Successful Inventors---X",
"source": "Scientific American 137, (October 1927). p. 328-329",
"archive": "",
"notes": "The idea that a mathematical formula can bring about a more sensitive radio receiver.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 98,
"year": 1927,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "need",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "An Industrial Expert Tells Why Manufacturers Must Seek New Inventions to Keep Their Wheels Turning. […] \"'Our experience with inventors and with manufacturers indicates that there is a tremendous amount of inventive effort going to waste. A great deal of free-lance inventing means that the poor inventor spends a vast amount of time and thought and often hard-earned savings working up some useless gadget that nobody will have. \"The inventor must realize that the first requisite of any new invention is that there be a possibility of broad human need underlying it, and ma­ chinery for its distribution that can be made to turn without spending a small fortune. Let him remember the really outstanding inventions and think of them not as mechanical creations but as things that made it possible for humanity to ride where it had walked; to bridge space with conversation where it formerly required days to transmit messages. / Let him remember Gillette's safety razor. The money on this invention has been made not through the razor but the blades. / Gillette's funda­mental idea from which that invention sprung was that he wanted to get something for which there would be un­ limited repeat business. His hitting upon a blade that could be used and thrown away was a real stroke of genius. / This element of need is the thing that has been fundamental in inventions which have won commercial success. Before he spends a lot of time, therefore, let the inventor check up on the potential market.",
"author": "Wright, Milton",
"title": "Successful Inventors---XII",
"source": "Scientific American 137, (December 1927). 513-515 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 99,
"year": 1927,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "After the long and toilsome rise, American civilization had reached, at the summer solstice of Normalcy, the high plateau of permanent peace and prosperity. […] Notes of jubilee drowned the plaintive cries of farmers and the queasy doubts of querulous critics. According to the golden appearance of things, intensity would create novelty upon novelty, gadget upon gadget, to keep the nation's machine whirling; inevitably outlets would be found for the accumulations of capital and the torrents of commodities; and employment would be afforded for laborers befitting their merits and diligence. Articles for comfort and convenience, devices for diversion and amusement were multiplying with sensational rapidity, giving promise of a satisfaction even more gratifying. Corporations were swelling in size, holding companies were rising to dizzy heights, the tide of liquid claims to wealth were flooding in.",
"author": "Beard, Charles Austin and Marry Ritter Beard",
"title": "America in Midpassage. The Rise of American Civilization: Volume 3",
"source": "New York: Macmillan Company. 1927. p. 3-4",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 471,
"year": 1927,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The old Ford was almost austerely a utility. For long it made no compromise with fashion or esthetic demand. Everything was sacrificed to continuous mass production; the one reliance for sales was cheapness and more cheapness. It adopted no mechanical improvements or refinements. It was always black. It was not advertised. It had no gadgets or gewgaws. Its lineS were high and awkward. In short, it was a flivver.",
"author": "",
"title": "\"The New Flivverism\"",
"source": "The New Republic: 12/14/27, Vol. 53 Issue 680, p83-85",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 100,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "mini",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "a miniature replica in bronze of the Egyptian Sphinx, save that it had a long, curved tail.\" hieroglyphics on the sides. \"Interesting gadget, he said.",
"author": "",
"title": "",
"source": "Boys Life, 1928",
"archive": "",
"notes": "A small paperweight",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 101,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "ad",
"quote": "It contains full particulars of the unique Gramophone Service for Records by Post, Records on Approval, the Exchange of Gramophones and Records. Motors, Tone Arms, Soundboxes, and every possible Gadget and Accessory connected with the Gramophone free and post free.",
"author": "",
"title": "Everything for the Gramophone",
"source": "The Gramophone, vol. 6. 1928",
"archive": "",
"notes": "ad",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 102,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "ad",
"quote": "Where did you put that gadget, thingamabob or whatsit that you saved for just such an occasion as this? Closets will have to be searched, the basement looked into, ad you may even desperately ransack the attic. Use a good flashlight.",
"author": "",
"title": "",
"source": "Popular Science, October 1928",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Eveready battery ad",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 103,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "vehicle",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Their transport was a weird six-wheeled automobile that traveled on a roadbed of wire netting. While one roll was stretched in front of the car, another was being picked up behind it. […] The wheels of their homemade six-wheeled car, which they named a 'gadget,' were equipped with flat wooden tires, thirty inches wide. Steering was done by braking on first one wheel and then the other.",
"author": "",
"title": "A New Highway for an Old Empire",
"source": "Popular Mechanics. Oct 1928. p. 627-8",
"archive": "",
"notes": "on pioneer surveyors staked out in the Florida Everglades",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 104,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The Handley Page or Lachmann slot has been applied to actual airplanes with success. Its wider adoption is a matter of the mechanical complexities its use involves, of the objections that constructors and pilots have to the use of 'gadgets,' and of doubts as to its mechanical reliability in rough service.",
"author": "Klemin, Alexander",
"title": "Learning to Use Our Wings",
"source": "Scientific American 138, (February 1928), p. 160-161",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 105,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "Doubtless there are devices which might in some cases assist a trapped crew to escape. But the device which may save life in one contingency will be useless in another and all submaries would be handicapped and their buoyancy seriously curtailed for the one problematical case when such apparatus would be useful. […] So the gain would be worse than doubtful. considered purely from the viewpoint of personal safety, all naval officers prefer a ship which can fight to one cluttered up with 'safety' gadgets; witness for instance the fact that a battleship carries no life boats. It is an old saying that 'a bright look-out is the best lifeboat,' and that principle applies to every sort of ship.",
"author": "Rowland, John T.",
"title": "The 'Why' of the 'S-4' Disaster.",
"source": "Scientific American 138, (March 1928) p. 219-221",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 106,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "On the Memphis, coming back from Paris, Slim [LIndbergh's nickname] rigged up a gadget to work a shower bath from the outside. He tried it first on a newspaperman who, fully clothed and expecting to get a 'human interest' item out of the 'invention' Slim asked him to inspect, stepped under the shower and got literally 'all wet' when Lindbergh pulled the string.",
"author": "",
"title": "Lindbergh--How He Does It; An Amazing Revelation",
"source": "Popular Science Monthly, April, 1928. p. 14",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 442,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "one of Jefferson's most ingenious devices, for the rungs are all hinged, the uprights are grooved, and the whole thing folds up into the appearance of a single, solid, slender piece of mahogany (see page 484). Above the same portico is a weather vane, but its mechanism extends down to the out-of-door ceiling, where he installed a dial and indicator, so that he could inform himself of the direction of the wind without leaving the protection of his own roof (see Color Plate XVIII). THE OWNER OF MONTICELLO LOVED A GADGET Jefferson designed and built several curious tables. One of these had a revolving top, so that sitting by it he could, without |p488 rising, bring to his hand objects on the opposite side of it? a sort of first cousin to \" Lazy Susan. \" Another of his tables had hollow legs, in which were rods supporting the writing surface; but these rods were so hinged to the top that he could not only raise and secure the top at a height which made it convenient for him to write or read or draw at it when standing up or sitting down, but he could also tilt the top at any angle he found convenient. Obviously he belonged to that large brotherhood which loves a gadget. Quick to appreciate ingenious novelties, he picked them up wherever he found them, and not only brought them home, but he improved them. One such contrivance was an attachment which he found in Milan, for the hub of his carriage wheel to tell the nummer of revolutions made obviously the granddaddy of the modern speedometer. Another was a polygraph, a writing machine, which made two copies with only one writing (see Color Plate XXIV). Jefferson improved on this, so that his polygraph",
"author": "Wilstach, Paul",
"title": "\"Jefferson's Little Mountain\"",
"source": "National Geographic: 1928: April: 481-503",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "x"
},
{
"id": 443,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gag",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "man who probably was thinking the thing out, sitting quietly at a desk. THE headquarters of the Hoover state organization in Forty-first Street are even rougher-looking. The brick walls show through the plaster in two places. Nothing here equals the national committee's farm, but the place is busier. Phones ring a lot, earnest ladies come in and offer to Do Something, wan salesmen appear with little things to sell -- ashtrays with elephants on them, collapsible drinking cups bearing the likeness of Hoover, all sorts of bibelots. They say this is the biggest gadget and gewgaw campaign since Harrison and Tyler. Campaign songs are offered in greatest abundance. An excited composer phoned the offices at nine one night (they are open till after midnight) and wanted to sing his song over the wire. Someone had to listen. People with mottoes and slogans arc next in number to songwriters. One man offered to sell for thirty-five dollars the line, \" H, the beginning of Hoover and the end of Smith. \" Some phrase-coiners send their slogans along by wire.",
"author": "White, E.B.",
"title": "Talk of the Town",
"source": "New Yorker: 1928-10-06: p. 17-21",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 472,
"year": 1928,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "A student we interviewed said that when he applied for enrollment he did very well with the bars, and was told to go out to the line of planes waiting for flights. It was all quite casual. He was given the name of an instructor and told to report to him. He had to hunt for this man, whom he finally found off at one side of the field eating a hot dog. This teacher of fledglings, with but the preliminary of a perfunctory handshake, began his work immediate-ly by pointing out a few of the main gadgets. After a little of this he told the novice to get in the plane, and off they went aloft. The student was in the air half an hour after his enrollment, not counting out the time he spent hunting up the instructor. The planes have dual controls; the student sits behind the pilot. Some instructors give advice and orders through tubes connected with earphones in the student's helmet. Others use hand and arm signals.",
"author": "Johnston, Alva",
"title": "\"Talk of the Town\"",
"source": "New Yorker: 1928-09-15: p. 17-21",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 107,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gag",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "It must be wonderful,' babbled Gladys, ' to be a big, business man and sell people things.' 'It is,' agreed Saleratus. 'Only I'm not.' 'Oh, yes, you are,' Gladys rattled on. 'You sell people heaps and heaps of things, whether they want them or not.' 'I do?' asked Saleratus. 'Yes, you do. You see I know all about you. I've been just crazy to meet you, and I was thrilled when Jessica told me you were coming to-night.' 'You were,' said Saleratus. 'I certainly was. I wish you'd try to sell me something.' 'Hey,' muttered Saleratus. 'Yes, I do. Won't you sell me something?' 'I'll sell you a gag,' Saleratus rejoined, as the car hit a particularly wicked bump in the road down which they were flying. 'A what?' asked Gladys, righting herself. 'A gadget,' said Saleratus. 'What's that?' 'A do funny you put on a machine.' 'Why would I want a gadget?' 'You wouldn't,' said Saleratus. 'Then why try to sell me one,' said Gladys. 'I won't,' replied Saleratus. 'Don't you just love nature?' asked Gladys.",
"author": "Livermore, George G.",
"title": "Carry On!",
"source": "Boys' Life, August 1929",
"archive": "",
"notes": "a salesman flirting with a young woman on a car ride",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 108,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "To those of us who, by choice or otherwise, spend the winter in the cooler climates where winter golf is the exception rather than the rule, the slowly passing days of late winter bring with them wistful visions of roll­ing fairways and smooth velvety greens. Then out come the clubs for cleaning and polishing and the time is at hand to take stock of the accessories. What have the past few months contributed to the art of golf? you ask yourself. And at least part of the answer is presented on this page where we show a few of the \"gadgets\" that are now available for the golf enthusiast. May' they help you to improve your game this season.",
"author": "",
"title": "Accessories for the Golf Player",
"source": "Scientific American 140, (April 1929). p. 345-345",
"archive": "",
"notes": "ball cleaner, arm support, tees, golf umbrella",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 109,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "But let's just forget about ignition switches and other fancy business and see what we actually do with the six-volt battery current. This little square thing I'm drawing now is supposed to be the spark coil, and this funny gadget right next to it is the contact breaker or timer. One terminal of the battery is wired to the frame of the car and there's a wire from the other pole of the battery to the spark coil. Then there's a wire from the spark coil to the insulated, stationary contact point in the timer.",
"author": "",
"title": "How the Ignition System Works",
"source": "Popular Science, March 1929. p. 89",
"archive": "",
"notes": "In typical dialogue, frame story style, explaining how the mechanism works through the mechanism of story",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 110,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "You know, of course, that the weak radio impulse that reaches your set by way of the antenna is amplified or strengthened many times before it is converted into the electrical equivalent of sound that you can hear. This strengthening of the radio signal is accomplished by passing it through several circuits, each of which consists, essentially, of a vacuum tube, a coil of wire, and a queer-looking metal gadget with two sets of metal fins, called a condenser. You have noticed how some of these fins slide in between others without actually coming into contact, when you turn the knob that tunes the stations. Moving these fins, or condenser plates, governs the tuning of the individual stage of amplification. The same result could be obtained by changing the number of turns in the coil of wire, but it is mechanically more convenient to do the tuning by moving the condenser plates.",
"author": "",
"title": "Why Two Sets May Look Alike, But Behave Differently",
"source": "Popular Science, Feb 1929, p. 64",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 111,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "A 'Gadget' for Focussing: [sic] A small negative of smoked glass, with a clear cross scratched on it, fixed at another part of this holder in the same plane as the one to be enlarged from at times very useful for focussing purposes.",
"author": "",
"title": "",
"source": "The Photographic Journal: Including the Transactions of the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, Photographic Society of London. vol. 69. 1929. ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 112,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "In addition to the 5,400 stars down to the 6.2 magnitude the planetarium projects the Milky Way. This is projected separately from little gadgets on the side of the apparatus.",
"author": "Ingalls, Albert G.",
"title": "Canned Astronomy: What the New Planetariums for Chicago and Philadelphia Will Be Like",
"source": "Scientific American 141, (September 1929). p. 201-204 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 113,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "trivial+ad",
"quote": "Here's the handiest, best-looking toilet case you ever saw. A simple solid-leather box, minus the tricky loops and gadgets and cubby holes which waste time and patience. You just toss toilet articles in. No packing at all … everything fits.",
"author": "",
"title": "New Idea in Toilet Kits",
"source": " Scientific American 141, (September 1929). p. 246-247",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 114,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "With the holiday season three weeks past Mr. Edgell had about gone through his presents; all that remained was an odd-looking gadget of nickel, which bore the cryptic stamp, 'Griffo-W128. Pat. 1927.' Mr. Edgell didn't know what it was meant for. He had been bafled by it ever since Christmas morning, when it had arrived from the Dillards, along with some handkerchiefs of a sort of bleached burlap, and a tie.\" Don't you know what it is? \"It's a--a--puzzle.' There was a long pause, and finally Mr. Edgell elaned forward in his chair. 'Yes, Alberta,' he said, sweetly, 'and it's a damn good one.",
"author": "Reed, Johnston",
"title": "The Amateur Gadgeteer",
"source": "The New Yorker. January 19, 1929. p. 59-60",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 115,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The pocket lighter, that little gadget which replaces matches and supplies a light for the cigar by a simple flip of the thumb--sometimes--has become so popular in this country that many varieties of cigar-stand filling stations have been devised.",
"author": "",
"title": "Filling Station for Pocket Lighters.",
"source": "Scientific American 140, (April 1929). p. 346-348",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 444,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "language",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "less. DR. AVERY You know this doesn't surprise me, my boy. -- Doesn't surprise me at all. RAPHAEL LORD It doesn't surprise you because you don't believe it. DR. AVERY It doesn't surprise me because I've been expecting something of the sort. p. 17 RAPHAEL LORD How do you mean? DR. AVERY You know I've been very interested in you ever since you came here. I don't mind admitting that I've rather studied you. I felt pretty certain that you'd produce some little gadget out of your mind to demonstrate your superiority to yourself and to the rest of the world. So it's prophecy! Well! Well! I have in mind a book: \" Varieties of Egomania. \" You shall have a footnote in it. RAPHAEL LORD Only a footnote? DR. AVERY Maybe a chapter! RAPHAEL LORD You think I'm a case, don't you? DR. AVERY In a sense everyone's a case. RAPHAEL LORD In a short time, in two years",
"author": "Behrman, Samuel Nathaniel",
"title": "Meteor [play]",
"source": "",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 473,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "apparatus",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "…pathologist and dentist, took the body apart. They found that its jawbones were decayed, also parts of the skull, a bone in the right thigh, and four teeth. The heart and lungs were sound, but other internal organs yellow with rot. # The death of Mrs. Cardow, onetime dial painter for the Waterbury Clock Co., like the deaths and protracted illnesses of U.S. Radium Corp. scientists and minor employes (TIME, June 4, Nov. 26) is a social penalty for the public's demand to have night-luminous watches, clocks, gadgets.",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Radium Poisoning\"",
"source": "Time Magazine: 1929/04/01",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 474,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "lagging one night at a dinner party in Paris some three years ago, Mr. Alexander Calder amused his table companion by making a chicken out of a piece of bread and a hairpin. A success story has grown from that idle bit of modelling. Mr. Calder's kangaroo is now one of the heaviest-selling gadgets in the Christmas toy lists; his bear, bull, and dog are also popular numbers. He has also had an enormous succor d'estime with a wire, felt, and heaver-hoard circus. These raw materials he took up when he abandoned bread and hairpins. The Calder circus is in town now. You can't buy tickets to it, but people who have seen it say it is worth getting a bid to a private showing.",
"author": "Coates, Robert",
"title": "\"Talk of the Town\"",
"source": "New Yorker: 1929-12-07: p. 21-25",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 475,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Adjoining Mr. Powers' office on the top floor (just below the putting green) is a conference room with a fireplace, and a negro butler. Mr. Powers has friends in to lunch there. Food is prepared in a kitchen elaborate with gadgets of the engraver's own invention -- built-in drawers, a special coffee-grinder, and newfangled ice-making machine. The table service, for six, is of heavy gold, modelled after one the Kaiser owned. At one end of the conference room \" Does this one say' ma-nla' too? \" stands a large filing cabinet. \" What do you think that is? \" Mr. Powers asks his guests. \" A filing cabinet, \" they reply.",
"author": "Hellman, Gregory",
"title": "\"Talk of the Town\"",
"source": "New Yorker: 1929-12-21: p. 17-21",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 476,
"year": 1929,
"decade": 1920,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The chief products of the \"Gadget Age\" are, quite properly, gadgets, and in no field is a new gadget greeted with mroe jjoy than in the realm of amateur cinematography. Therefore, I wish to suggest a new device especially adapted for the use of prisms, but having other auxiliary features of real value to the amateur.",
"author": "Oswald, Carl L.",
"title": "\"Prism Performance\"",
"source": "Movie Makers: March 1929",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 116,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "What do you think pleases my guests the most?' Lewis asked. After my tour of bewildering wonders I hesitated. The engineer smiled and pointed to a shiny metal gadget on the wall. 'That little twenty-five-cent bottle opener and corkscrew, combined, makes more of a hit, if you'll believe it, than some of our most ambitious engineering schemes. They think it's wonderful, and ask where they can buy one like it or whether they can have an extra one as a souvenir. That's human nature, I guess. The average man, when he turns on a light or opens a radiator valve, doesn't think of the power plant below that supplies him light and heat. There's far more to running a hotel than one ever sees in a guest room.'",
"author": "",
"title": "Modern Hotel Is a Huge Machine",
"source": "Popular Science, April 1930. p. 142",
"archive": "",
"notes": " Both small, simple, utilitarian device, and something of a triviality that can cause wonderment at how it amuses people.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 117,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "What's that? said a St. Louis banker. Peel potatoes with a crank! It's absolutely incredible. Just another inventor's crazy pipe-dream. Why, I know a lot of women who would pay you ten dollars a piece for such a gadget and figure they had a bargain.",
"author": "",
"title": "Peel Potatoes With a Crank!",
"source": "Popular Mechanics, Dec 1930. ",
"archive": "",
"notes": "advertisement",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 118,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "ad",
"quote": "Say, here's another glass gadget… Right! The Vivo Tube, for fainting and insect bites, isn't the only 'glass gadget' in the Official First Aid Kit. Take a look at the Mercurochrome Swab. It's a little glass tube with a brush on the end. Break the tip inside the brush--out comes mercurochrome, an antiseptic.",
"author": "",
"title": "",
"source": "Boy's Life, April 1930. p. 54",
"archive": "",
"notes": "advertisement for Bauer & Black first aid kit",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 119,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "patent",
"quote": "But women are becoming more practical, and they have the advantage over men of knowing what is wanted in the sphere of domestic inventions. Every housewife is an inventor, because almost day of her life, she is making something new or devising some gadget.",
"author": "",
"title": "The 'Brain Wave' Room",
"source": "Popular Mechanics, April 1930. p. 578",
"archive": "",
"notes": "Story that questions whether pace of invention and patents will cease. Focuses on the woman inventor. Followed by a list of household inventions people want.",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 120,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "nautical",
"quote": "The Old Man was at dinner. When about to work on a plate of salad, he jabbed his fork against something that clinked. He growled and fished out a brass disk about the size of an English shilling. He slammed the thing on the tablecloth and stare at it until his eyeballs almost popped out. Then he roared: 'Boy! Boy!' Cato came on the lope from the pantry. 'What,' demanded the Admiral, 'is this gadget?' Cato lenas over and spells out the words on the tag carefully. He's a Filipino, just getting educated. 'Hum,' he finally said. 'Look lak a dog-license, yessa!",
"author": "MacDowell, Syl",
"title": "The Admiral's Gun Swab",
"source": "Boy's Life, June 1930. p. 30.",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 121,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "Can you get one and fit it to my car? The circular says it's a new invention that will give twice as much mileage on the same gasoline and make the motor more powerful. … I've seen this one before. It's a phoney gadget that doesn't work. … Of course, they'd get better results by adjusting the carburetor for a leaner mixture without bothering with any extra gadget.",
"author": "",
"title": "You Can't Save Gas with Gadgets -- Better to Adjust Car's Carburetor Than Fool with Useless Devices, Says Gus",
"source": "Popular Science Monthly, July 1930",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 122,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The entire inventory of materials which C.A. Olson, Oakland Avenue, West­wood, New Jersey, used in making his mirror may be seen in the photograph reproduced below. With the exception of the pitch lap, a few chemicals used in silvering the glass, and other inexpensive gadgets, the whole array is of the kind that can be picked up around the average household and is typical of the kind used in telescope making. Note absence of tools; none are used.",
"author": "",
"title": "The Amateur Astronomer",
"source": "Scientific American 142, (February 1930). p. 160-162",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 123,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "In our July 1930 issue we described the very interesting experiments of Dr. Geer of Ithaca, whereby rubber, oil-impregnated airplane \"overshoes\" seem to have met the danger of ice formation. It still remains to be seen whether practical aviators will resort to these overshoes. Airmen have a horror of gadgets, and operators may fear that the added cost and a possible decrease in aerodynamic efficiency will be prohibitive. In the meantime it is the consensus that it is a very sound plan to warn the pilot that he is flying in a danger zone, namely where temperatures are between -4 degrees and 0 degrees, centigrade, and when he had better proceed to a zone of higher or lower temperatures.",
"author": "McHugh, F.D. et al.",
"title": "Scientific American 143, (September 1930). p. 212-228",
"source": "",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 124,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "What my wife wanted was a place to hang brooms and mops, so I made the automatic holder illustrated, tested it, and triumphantly called her to behold a gadget that really works.",
"author": "",
"title": "Automatic Holder Grips Broom Handles",
"source": "Popular Science, May 1930. p. 114",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 125,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Now we'll give it a real good cleaning out, he said as he carried the radiator over to the washstand and attached a special fixture to the lower hose connection. What's that gadget? Backson inquired. Latest thing to clean radiators, Gus replied. Water goes in the big pipe and the little one is connected to the air pressure line. Shooting the air in with the water in short bursts fills the radiator with a churning mixture of water and bubbles that loostens the sludge and rust lots better than the ordinary flushing out.",
"author": "",
"title": "What You Should Know About Antifreeze",
"source": "Popular Science, Dec 1930. p. 86",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 445,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "engineer came strolling along the deck. He paused at Charlie's chair. \" About time for our tour of the engine room, Mr. Chan, \" he remarked. \" Ah, yes, \" returned the Chinese. \" You were kind enough to promise me that pleasure when we talked together last night. Captain Keane, I am sure, would enjoy to come along. \" He looked inquiringly at Keane. |p259The captain stared back, amazed. \" Me? Oh, no, thanks. I've no interest in engines. Wouldn't know a gadget from a gasket. And care less. \" Charlie glanced up at the engineer. \" Thank you so much, \" he said. \" If you do not object, I will postponemy own tour. I desire short talk with Captain Keane. \" \" All right, \" nodded the engineer, and moved away. Chan was regarding Keane grimly. \" You know nothing about engines? \" he suggested. \" Certainly not. What are you getting at, anyhow? \" \" Some months ago",
"author": "Biggers, Earl Derr",
"title": "Charlie Chan Carries On",
"source": "",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 446,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "british",
"quote": "it? Shut the door. \" He examined the card. \" Never heard of this chap. Look at this, Goath. Anybody you know? What does he want? \" \" Wanted to speak to you, sir, \" replied Stanley, looking very mysteriousand important, with a hint of the \" shadderer \" in his manner. \" Very important. That's what he said. \" \" I'll bet he did, \" said Mr. Dersingham, with a grin at the other two. \" Probably wants to sell me some ridiculous office gadget. If he did, though, he'd probably have something about it on his card. This is a private card. Golspie, Golspie? No, I don't know him. Look here, Stanley, just tell him I'm having a discussion -- no, a thingumty -- a conference, just now, but if it's something really important, not trying to sell me typewriters and files and muck, I'll see him soon. He can either call again or he can wait",
"author": "Priestly, John",
"title": "Angel Pavement",
"source": "The Sundial Press 1944",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 447,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "misc",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "on her dress. JOE (A command) I'm having this dance. YOUNG MANHey -- cutting in don't go here! JOE (emphatically) Screw -- son! The young man sees that Joe means what he says and slinks away. JOE (to Kitty) I got a little job for you. KITTY (fearfully) What is it, Joe? JOE (pointing to pom-pom) We're going to dance by Scar Sherman -- and when we do, I want you to rub that scar with that gadget you've got there. KITTY (looks up at him, wondering if she can beg out) But, Joe -- (The hard expression in his face tells her there is no chance to back out) Sure -- I'll do it. -- 94 -- JOERight. He puts his arm around her and whirls her off to the dance floor. 276. FULL SHOT DANCE FLOOR The six gorillas are now on the floor dancing with girls. They are forming a circle about Dan and",
"author": "Turner, George Kibbe",
"title": "Those Who Dance [film script]",
"source": "",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 448,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "have food that the skipper will cat without a growl, or else you gain the cook's tolerance by letting him boil rice and open a tin of beef for dinner, and hear the skipper cursing all cooks and mates to Gehenna. Besides this, you have to navigate, which breaks up your morning watches below; and you have to sailorize when you should be pacing the deck, admiring the billowy ocean, and enjoying yourself as a chief officer should!' Feeling much better after this, I gave the flywheel another turn, flipped the spark-plug gadget with my index finger, and to my surprise and consternation the thing started off with a terrible explosion of backfiring. With my heart in my mouth I jumped to the switch and turned it off. Then I climbed out of the engine room as nonchalantly as possible to tell, the Captain that I had just tuned up the machine and left it in fine running order. I heard you bombarding the settlement,' Andy replied curtly, and returned to his work on the topmast gear. February 17",
"author": "Frisbie, Robert Dean",
"title": "South sea fairylands: A Kanaka voyage",
"source": "The Atlantic Monthly: Aug 1930: p. 190",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 477,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "lever",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "There are other moveable parts to the camera but they stay put when you put ‘em and the machinery doesn’t affect them. If you want a full list of them here it is. I spoke of the spring that you must wind. Then you must set up your ‘finder,’ if it is exposed and not built-in. You must set your ‘diaphragm,’ or the light-regulating gadget in the lens. In some cases you must focus your lens. You must ‘press the button.’",
"author": "Winton, Roy W.",
"title": "\"Things I Was Ashamed to Ask\"",
"source": "Movie Makers: May 1930",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 478,
"year": 1930,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "american",
"quote": "In the course of a post mortem on the late and generally lamented international yacht races, a London newspaper remarked that ‘British seamanship was defeated by Yankee gadgets.’ This referred, of course, to the fact that the ‘Enterprise’ used various mechanical labor-saving devices for the speedy raising and lower of sails, whereas the ‘Shamrock’ relied exclusively on old-fashioned elbow grease. / Hollywood’s position of leadership in the celluloid world is invariably attributed to the superiority of ‘Yankee gadgets’—the sound recording apparatus behind the greatest gadget of all. / There is plenty of truth in this. For this development of the purely mechanical part of film production in Hollywood has become one of the major miracles of history. If only some of the other departments had kept pace with this development . . . but there is no point in indulging in depressing and fruitless speculation. [. . . ] There has been much talk lately of the dreadful mechanical Robot that is ruining Art in our modern civilization. Our finer aesthetic sensibilities, we are told, are being mangled in the ruthless cog-wheels of the Machine Age. / Insofar as Hollywood is concerned, however, it is the Robot, the Spirit of the Gadget, that most nearly approaches that goal of perfection toward which all art strives. / How often do we see pictures in which the technical qualities—the photography, sound reproduction, mechanical effects—are inferior to the flesh, the blood and the grey matter? Almost never. For an excellent example of just what I mean, have a look at ‘Hell’s Angels.’",
"author": "Sherwood, Robert E.",
"title": "\"Hal Hall Says\"",
"source": "American Cinematographer: November 1930",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "next to an advertisement in comic strip form on two young men learning how to build film equipment and record sound film and making money selling reels of auto races http://www.archive.org/stream/americancinematographer11-1930-11#page/n19/mode/2up/search/gadget",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "x"
},
{
"id": 126,
"year": 1931,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Slynes, Elkweather & Uffley Gadgets. It is attractively filled with gadgets (as well as widjums and whassats) in all colors. Perhaps it is as well to mention that these are irregularly shaped objects varying in size from that of a marble to that of a small boulder. Price tags are conspicuously attached to them as they await purchasers in the window. They are much sought after for gifts by persons who wish to be considered original.\" (3) On Mr. Uffley's disease: \"What are leu- leucocytes?\" \"Leucocytes? A kind of gadget. Nothing but gadgets!\" George Uffley takes pride in being able to draw gadgets, which his young son is working up to. gadgets numbered \"Number C 75, Number S 8080, Number M 44.",
"author": "Wilde, Perciva",
"title": "Gadgets: A Mechanistic Tragicomedy",
"source": "Ten Plays for Little Theatres. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company. 1931",
"archive": "",
"notes": "cene opens outside",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 127,
"year": 1931,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "definition",
"quote": "If technique is, as Mark Twain suggested, doing something simple in a complicated way, then a wrinkle suggests the reverse of this; that is, a simple method of doing something complicated. If a botanist requires several complex solutions to stain certain fibbers, that is technique. Another botanist's suggestion that he would get the same result with a drop of marking ink is a wrinkle.",
"author": "",
"title": "Wrinkles and Gadgets",
"source": "Watson's Microscope Record. Issues 22-38. 1931",
"archive": "",
"notes": "FIND THIS",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "x"
},
{
"id": 128,
"year": 1931,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "One thing is certain: manufacturers of automobile accessories are going to be affected by the general trend toward complete equipment on the newer cars. No longer need the new·car buyer invest a substantial sum in heat indicators, mirrors, ash trays, air cleaners, oiling systems, and so on.They are all there when the car is delivered.On the other hand, those of us who have, of necessity or choice, to keep our old cars for another season, constitute a potential market for \"gadgets\" of various kinds that have been developed since our cars were made.",
"author": "",
"title": "Across the Editor's Desk",
"source": " Scientific American 144, (February 1931). p. 77-78",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 129,
"year": 1931,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "There is no question but that the American working man is our biggest customer. He knows that his net income is very much higher under the high wage system than under the other; his percentage of \"luxury\" or \"pleasure\" cash is much greater under the former than under the latter. He has, accordingly adjusted his standard of living to a scale higher than Europeans know or have known. He has a car with all the necessary or foolish gadgets, a six- or eight- or ten-tube radio, good clothes, plenty of good food, and more comforts than a medieval king.",
"author": "",
"title": "Our Point of View",
"source": "Scientific American 145, (July 1931). p. 12-13",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 479,
"year": 1931,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "wrinkle",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "We often wonder when Jackson Rose sleeps. Jack is one of Hollywood’s best known cameramen. But he is equally well known for his creation of new gadgets and devices to aid in the cinematographic field. Some time ago he brought out a focus chart that created much interest. Now he has improved upon that chart and has produced a gadget that should prove a very valuable adjunct to any cameraman’s equipment. It is a combination focus chart and scene slate. On one side is the chart, on the other the slate. The entire gadget is of a heavy quality fabrakoid. The entire chart and slate folds up and when ready for packing or putting in the pocket is 12 inches x 4 3/4 inches in size. On the outside of the gadget is a place for the camera report for the laboratory. The device should be very valuable on location trips.",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Another Device from Jackson Rose, A.S.C.\"",
"source": "American Cinematographer: April 1931",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "img"
},
{
"id": 480,
"year": 1931,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "film",
"quote": "A couple of weeks later he aroused the curiosity, and the ire, of the engineer in charge of the power house when he started installing a peculiar looking gadget in the base of the huge chimney. It consisted of a selenium cell on one side of the chimney, and an electric bulb on the other. And when the next rain fell the young Cal Tech man did not have to go out and get wet, for the smoke would cut off the light and thus operate the galvanometer hooked to the cell, ringing a bell when the smoke would appear. The apparatus was so good that it is still in use in the chimney after all these years. / The young college student was Frank Capra . . . ",
"author": "Hall, Hal",
"title": "\"An Interview with Frank Capra\"",
"source": "American Cinematographer: April 1931",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "x"
},
{
"id": 130,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "now Mr. Graves is in again with something else-a new telescope with an 8 1/2-inch Pyrex mirror, on a Springfield mounting and a pedestal made of 6-inch pipe fittings, and driven by a Dictophone motor. He has also constructed a dingbat for making the knife-edge test. This, he admits, is against the rules of the game (ATM page 97) but says he made it, anyway, just for fun.",
"author": "Ingalls, Albert G.",
"title": "The Amateur Astronomer",
"source": " Scientific American 146, (May 1932). p. 296-315 ",
"archive": "",
"notes": " photo caption: \"Graves' gadget.\"",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 131,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "trivial",
"quote": "The answer is a multiple one : The use of rear flaps changes the trim or balance, and therefore stability has to be carefully considered when flaps or variable-area wings are used; human nature is conservative pilots dislike intensely everything that partakes of the character of a \"gadget\"; cost and weight are always in­ creased no matter what slot or flap is applied.",
"author": "",
"title": "Lift Increase Devices",
"source": " Scientific American 147, (October 1932) p. 232-251",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 132,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "mini",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "The small trinkets sometimes known as 'gallantries' are a minor phase of eighteenth-century culture, but not without their significance. No material is more suitable than porcelain…",
"author": "Schmidt, Robert and William Arnold Thorpe",
"title": "Porcelain as an Art and a Mirror of Fashion. Chatper 4: Toys and Gadgets",
"source": "G.G. Harrap & Co., Ltd. 1932",
"archive": "",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 449,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "her again she flung him aside, her strength gathering. Anger and renewed horror made her strong and she warded herself from his fingers. She ran down the hill and out to the corn rows, leaping over the new green shoots and the plucked grain that the crows had despoiled, and she scattered the clods to a small dust that trembled in the air after her foot was gone. She walked through the house the next day on the duties assigned to her, as if she were no part of the place, as if she were an unrelated gadget pitched awkwardly through the utensils and through the prescribed hours. Her father spoke at the table: \" I spent the day in the corn. I replanted fifty hills the crows uprooted? a flock, a thousand strong, you'd think. \" \" I thought Joan made a scarecrow. \" They talked about the image in the upper field. \" No crow went anear the upper field, \" they said. Tony Wright came to the door of the house late in the morning and asked for",
"author": "Roberts, Elizabeth Madox",
"title": "\"The Scarecrow\"",
"source": "Harpers Magazine (193209) pages: 458-466",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 450,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "puckered from the salt. Nowadays nobody pops corn. Report has it that in New York City there are not more than ten or twelve popcorn stands. Any lover of the delicacy who can, offhand, think of more than two is lucky. Even at Coney Island, where the popcorn trade should be brisk, one can walk the length of the Boardwalk without seeing a stand. Perhaps modern invention has made the pioneer delight of eating popcorn seem an anachronism. At any rate, there is not the old joy in corn popped in a little electrical gadget that there used to be in the delicious stuff that was energetically shaken in a frying pan over a redhot stove. A German techni cian sees a city as Breathing a great organism of a constantly inhaling Metropolis. and exhaling vast breaths up and down in the atmosphere. In Berlin, he estimates, the breathing of human beings and animals and the exhausts of automobiles and chimneys produces at least 20,000 tons of carbon dioxide a day. Trees and other living plants absorb only a small fraction of the gas",
"author": "Laughlin, J. Laurence",
"title": "\"Topics of…\"",
"source": "New York Times: (Editorials): 19320107",
"archive": "coha",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 481,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "cog",
"secondary": "film",
"quote": "RKO as it stands today is the result, or rather one of the several results of an engineering gadget, the photo-electric cell wedded to another gadget called the radio tube, superimposed on the prior mechanisms of the motion picture.",
"author": "Ramsaye, Terry",
"title": "\"Aylesworth Puts Showmanship Foremost in New Regime at RKO\"",
"source": "Motion Picture Herald, April 30, 1932",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 482,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "An ingenious contraption called a \"Thrill- O-Meter\" was used for advance publicity on \"Rue Morgue\" by C. E. O'Donnell, manager of the Paramount Theatre, Baton Rouge, La. This thrill-o-meter was constructed by- building a lobby cut-out and using the figure of a gorilla. The display was arranged so that its base covered the lobby scales. Then under the scales platform, a water bag was placed, filled with colored liquid. The hot water bag was attached to a glass indicator tube which ran up the center of the cut-out. At various levels on the indicator, small cards were placed with copy such as : 200-220. .. .You like to be thrilled! 160-180. .. .We advise you to be accom- panied by an escort! 120-140 Its thrills will chill you! Wear an overcoat ! 80-100. . . .You have an average heart and can stand the supreme thrills in \"Murders in the Rue Morgue !\" 40- 60.... Don't enter unless accompanied by a friend ! - 20. . . .You're too young to see this pic- ture without your parents ! We believe the above description will en- able the average person to construct a simi- lar gadget, if the spirit so prompts him, and we are indebted to O'Donnell for passing along the information.",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Thrill-O-Meter Was Used by O'Donnell for Horror Picture\"",
"source": "Motion Picture Herald, April 16, 1932",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 483,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "rig",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "See that circular looking gadget above the stacks with part of the title \"Emma\" on it? That's not part of the bally; it's another contrivance that Jones rigged up with a bicycle wheel and a fan motor. It's really a round banner and instead of getting a mere eight feet of banner he gets twenty-one feet as it revolves. As the occasion warrants many changes can be made in copy and other gimmicks can be hung from the bottom edges. The entire display has the additional value of animation. ",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Here's a Trick Amphibian Ballyhoo from Cartoonist Jones!\"",
"source": "Motion Picture Herald, April 9, 1932",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 484,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge",
"secondary": "film+american",
"quote": "Eisenstein looked at his watch. His boat for Europe, the boat on which he sailed second class because he couldn’t afford the more luxurious rates, sailed in a few hours. / ‘And before I go I must buy a gadget,’ he said. ‘It is a marvelous gadget I heard about. You put it on a water tap and cold water becomes hot. I must take one with me.’ / He thought for a moment. / ‘That’s just it,’ he said. ‘Hollywood tries to use the same kind of gadgets. They want to turn the gadget on a writer and his cold stories are expected to come out warm. They can’t do it. Gadgets are only for mechanics. Not for humans. And picture business is a human business.",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Thinks Hollywood Gagged to Death; Afraid of New Things, Says Eisenstein\"",
"source": "Variety, April 26, 1932",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": "x"
},
{
"id": 485,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "tool",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Newest sideshow built around ‘mechanical phrenologist,’ intricate gadget that looks like a permanent waver. Plungers feel out cranial high spots and hollows and automatically type a ‘character analysis.’",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Chatter\"",
"source": "Variety, April 5, 1932",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 486,
"year": 1932,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "placeholder",
"secondary": "",
"quote": "Papa goes completely to ruin and son wanders around a bit. Then he invents a new gadget, restores the family fortune, and all is well.",
"author": "",
"title": "\"Film Reviews: Mein Leopold\"",
"source": "Variety, April 5, 1932",
"archive": "lantern",
"notes": "",
"requires_revision": "",
"important/image": ""
},
{
"id": 133,
"year": 1933,
"decade": 1930,
"primary": "gauge ",
"secondary": "trivial+british",
"quote": "I am glad to note that the author stresses the importance of the automobile engineer realising that all these electrical contrivances now used on the motor car are no longer gadgets, but are part of the whole scheme, and it seems to me of fund