The monorepo for the FOSS Harrow CI/CD collaboration project.
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README.md

Harrow.io Open Source

CLA assistant

PREVIEW

This is a brutally modified version of the upstream code which powers harrow.io which is currently offered as a dev bundle for modifying Harrow. The intention is that within a few weeks this message will go away, and harrow.io (hosted) will run the same codebase as is offered here, but there is a small amount of clean-up and canonicalization yet to do.

What Is This?

Harrow is a task-runner for people who build and manage software. It's designed to sit in the place of a traditional CI/CD build system whilst providing an element of accessibility and beauty for non-technical team members and stake-holders.

Harrow was borne out the popular Capistrano tool for Ruby (and Rails) deployments and created by the same people.

Operating as a successful online SaaS since 2015, Harrow is now released in it's entirety as a piece of (AGPL v3 licensed) free, open source software.

Why Does This Exist?

Harrow sits in a peculiar place in DevOps. DevOps as a movement has reached a plateau where "we have CI, and we do CD" has become the accepted state of the art.

Harrow's creators believe that DevOps can go further, ideally we'd achieve the same enlightenment that the Agile/XP movement brought to collaboration when building software and extend that to the whole life cycle of a piece of probably business-critical software.

Why Is The Code Open Source?

Harrow is/was VC funded, and having operated successfully so far, we want to use the opportunity afforded to us to give something back to the FOSS community to which we owe our existence.

What Is Included?

The entire software is included. Some parts of the repository are protected with GPG encryption, available only to those who are core maintainers of the commercial, hosted version of Harrow.

There are some private components held in separate repositories, namely the license key generation mechanisms for the enterprise version. The key verification systems are part of this open source repository.

For a quick summary please see the following entries:

  • frontend: The Angular (1.x) application which drives our whole official HTML5 client. This application has extensive integration tests.
  • style-guide: Imported by the front end as a bower module, contains a separate style-guide with all graphic and styling resources.
  • api: The Go packages that comprise the application, including the harrow fat-executable which contains all the micro-services which fulfil all the roles responsible for the backend.
  • notifiers: The notification used by the API.
  • knowledge-base: The Sphinx based knowledge-base and deployment recipes.
  • config-management: Ansible scripts for building and provisioning the development, staging and test environments using VirtualBox. The same scripts are applied to production.

See the README.md of each subdirectory for more explanation of their contents.

License

  • AGPL v3: https://www.gnu.org/licenses/agpl-3.0.html

  • See LICENSE.md

    Harrow, a continuous integration and collaboration software.

    Copyright (C) 2016 Harrow GmbH

    This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

    This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU Affero General Public License for more details.

    You should have received a copy of the GNU Affero General Public License along with this program. If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.

Truncated History

The Git history was truncated at the time of FOSS release to ensure that historical secrets and credentials were no longer in unreachable commits in the history. It is also partly because merging the individual projects into a monorepo was a relatively brutal merger.