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README.md

Discussion on Gitter npm version npm Build Status Dependency Status Hub Pulls Greenkeeper badge JavaScript Style Guide

Hawkeye Logo

The Hawkeye scanner-cli is a project security, vulnerability and general risk highlighting tool. It is meant to be integrated into your pre-commit hooks and your pipelines.

Running and configuring the scanner

The Hawkeye scanner-cli assumes that your directory structure is such that it keeps the toolchain's files on top level. Roughly, this is what it boils down to:

  • Node.js projects have a package.json on top level
  • Ruby projects will have a Gemfile on top level
  • Python projects will have a requirements.txt on top level
  • PHP projects will have a composer.lock on top level
  • Java projects will have a build (gradle) or target (maven) folder, and include .java and .jar files
  • Kotlin projects will have a build (gradle) or target (maven) folder, and include .kt and .jar files
  • Scala projects will have a target (sbt with sbt-native-packager or sbt-assembly plugins) folder, and include .scala and .jar files. Check this repo for a running demo.

This is not exhaustive as sometimes tools require further files to exist. To understand how the modules decide whether they can handle a project, please check the How it works section and the modules folder.

Docker (recommended)

The docker image is hands-down the easiest way to the scanner. Please note that your project root (e.g. $PWD) needs to be mounted to /target.

docker run --rm -v $PWD:/target hawkeyesec/scanner-cli:latest

If you are using the scanner to write a JSON (via the -j and --json CLI flags and the json setting in the .hawkeyerc), make sure that it uses the correct UID and GID via docker run -u $(id -u):$(id -g). Otherwise this might leave you with undeletable files, e.g. when running in Jenkins.

The docker build is also the recommended way to run the scanner in your CI pipelines. This is an example of running Hawkeye against one of your projects in GoCD:

<pipeline name="security-scan">
  <stage name="Hawkeye" cleanWorkingDir="true">
    <jobs>
      <job name="scan">
        <tasks>
          <exec command="docker">
            <arg>pull</arg>
            <arg>hawkeyesec/scanner-cli</arg>
            <runif status="passed" />
          </exec>
          <exec command="bash">
            <arg>-c</arg>
            <arg>docker run --rm -v $PWD:/target hawkeyesec/scanner-cli:latest</arg>
            <runif status="passed" />
          </exec>
        </tasks>
      </job>
    </jobs>
  </stage>
</pipeline>

npm

You can install and run hawkeye in a Node.js project via

npm install --save-dev @hawkeyesec/scanner-cli
npx hawkeye scan

This method is recommended in a Node.js project, where the other toolchains (e.g. python, ruby) are not required.

With this method, it is also recommended to invoke the scanner in a git pre-commit hook (e.g. via the pre-commit package) to fail the commit if issues are found.

Configuration Files (recommended)

You can configure the scanner via .hawkeyerc and .hawkeyeignore files in your project root.

The .hawkeyerc file is a JSON file that allows you to configure ...

  • the modules to run,
  • the writers to use, and
  • the failure threshold
{
    "all": true|false,
    "staged": true|false,
    "modules": ["files-ccnumber", "java-owasp", "java-find-secbugs"],
    "sumo": "http://your.sumologic.foobar/collector",
    "http": "http://your.logger.foobar/collector",
    "json": "log/results.json",
    "failOn": "low"|"medium"|"high"|"critical",
    "showCode": true|false
}

The .hawkeyeignore file is a collection of regular expressions matching paths and module error codes to exclude from the scan, and is equivalent to using the --exclude flag. Lines starting with # are regarded as comments.

Please note that any special charaters reserved in regular expressions (-[]{}()*+?.,^$|#\s) need to be escaped when used as a literal!

Please also note that the module error codes are usually not shown, since they are not primarily relevant for the user. If you want to exclude a certain false positive, you can display the module error codes with the flag --show-code or the showCode property in the .hawkeyerc.

^test/

# this is a comment

^README.md

The CLI

Use hawkeye modules to list the available modules and their status.

> npx hawkeye modules
[info] Version: v1.4.0
[info] Module Status
[info] Enabled:   files-ccnumber
[info]            Scans for suspicious file contents that are likely to contain credit card numbers
[info] Enabled:   files-contents
[info]            Scans for suspicious file contents that are likely to contain secrets
[info] Disabled:  files-entropy
[info]            Scans files for strings with high entropy that are likely to contain passwords
[info] Enabled:   files-secrets
[info]            Scans for suspicious filenames that are likely to contain secrets
[info] Enabled:   java-find-secbugs
[info]            Finds common security issues in Java code with findsecbugs
[info] Enabled:   java-owasp
[info]            Scans Java projects for gradle/maven dependencies with known vulnerabilities with the OWASP dependency checker
[info] Enabled:   node-npmaudit
[info]            Checks node projects for dependencies with known vulnerabilities
[info] Enabled:   node-npmoutdated
[info]            Checks node projects for outdated npm modules
[info] Enabled:   node-yarnaudit
[info]            Checks yarn projects for dependencies with known vulnerabilities
[info] Enabled:   node-yarnoutdated
[info]            Checks node projects for outdated yarn modules
[info] Enabled:   php-security-checker
[info]            Checks whether the composer.lock contains dependencies with known vulnerabilities using security-checker
[info] Enabled:   python-bandit
[info]            Scans for common security issues in Python code with bandit.
[info] Enabled:   python-piprot
[info]            Scans python dependencies for out of date packages
[info] Enabled:   python-safety
[info]            Checks python dependencies for known security vulnerabilities with the safety tool.
[info] Enabled:   ruby-brakeman
[info]            Statically analyzes Rails code for security issues with Brakeman.
[info] Enabled:   ruby-bundler-scan
[info]            Scan for Ruby gems with known vulnerabilities using bundler

Use hawkeye scan to kick off a scan:

> npx hawkeye scan --help
[info] Version: v1.3.0
Usage: hawkeye-scan [options]

Options:
  -a, --all                                       Scan all files, regardless if a git repo is found. Defaults to tracked files in git repositories.
  -t, --target [/path/to/project]                 The location to scan. Defaults to $PWD.
  -f, --fail-on [low|medium|high|critical]        Set the level at which hawkeye returns non-zero status codes. Defaults to low.
  -m, --module [module name]                      Run specific module. Defaults to all applicable modules.
  -e, --exclude [pattern]                         Specify one or more exclusion patterns (eg. test/*). Can be specified multiple times.
  -j, --json [/path/to/file.json]                 Write findings to file.
  -s, --sumo [https://sumologic-http-connector]   Write findings to SumoLogic.
  -H, --http [https://your-site.com/api/results]  Write findings to a given url.
  --show-code                                     Shows the code the module uses for reporting, useful for ignoring certain false positives
  -g, --staged                                    Scan only git-staged files.
  -h, --help                                      output usage information

Results

Exit Codes

The scanner-cli responds with the following exit codes:

  • Exit code 0 indicates no findings above or equal to the minimum threshold were found.
  • Exit code 1 indicates that issues were found above or equal to the minimum threshold.
  • Exit code 42 indicates that an unexpected error happened somewhere in the program. This is likely a bug and should not happen. Please check the log output and report a bug.

Redirecting the console output

If you wish to redirect the console logger output, the recommended method is latching onto stdout. In this example, we're making use of both JSON and stdout results:

docker run --rm -v $PWD:/target hawkeyesec/scanner-cli:latest -j hawkeye-results.json -f critical 2>&1 | tee hawkeye-results.txt

Console output

By default, the scanner outputs its results to the console in tabular form.

Sumologic

The results can be sent to a SumoLogic collector of your choice. In this example, we have a collector with a single HTTP source.

hawkeye scan --sumo https://collectors.us2.sumologic.com/receiver/v1/http/your-http-collector-url

In SumoLogic, search for _collector="hawkeye" | json auto:

SumoLogic

Any HTTP endpoint

Similar to the SumoLogic example, the scanner can send the results to any given HTTP endpoint that accepts POST messages.

hawkeye scan --http http://your.logging.foobar/endpoint

The results will be sent with User-Agent: hawkeye. Similar to the console output, the following JSON will be POSTed for each finding:

{
  "module": "files-contents",
  "level": "critical",
  "offender": "testfile3.yml",
  "description": "Private key in file",
  "mitigation": "Check line number: 3"
}

How it works

Hawkeye is designed to be extensible by adding modules and writers.

  • Add modules in the modules folder.
  • Add writers in the writers folder.

Modules

Modules are basically little bits of code that either implement their own logic, or wrap a third party tool and standardise the output. They only run if the required criteria are met. For example: The npm outdated module would only run if a package.json is detected in the scan target - as a result, you don't need to tell Hawkeye what type of project you are scanning.

Generic Modules

  • files-ccnumber: Scans for suspicious file contents that are likely to contain credit card numbers
  • files-contents: Scans for suspicious file contents that are likely to contain secrets
  • files-entropy: Scans files for strings with high entropy that are likely to contain passwords. Entropy scanning is disabled by default because of the high number of false positives. It is useful to scan codebases every now and then for keys, in which case please run it please using the -m files-entropy switch.
  • files-secrets: Scans for suspicious filenames that are likely to contain secrets

Java / Kotlin / Scala

  • java-find-secbugs: Finds common security issues in Java code with findsecbugs
  • java-owasp: Scans Java projects for gradle/maven dependencies with known vulnerabilities with the OWASP dependency checker

Node.js

  • node-npmaudit: Checks node projects for dependencies with known vulnerabilities with npm audit
  • node-npmoutdated: Checks node projects for outdated npm modules with npm outdated
  • node-yarnaudit: Checks yarn projects for dependencies with known vulnerabilities with yarn audit
  • node-yarnoutdated: Checks node projects for outdated yarn modules with yarn outdated

PHP

  • php-security-checker: Checks whether the composer.lock contains dependencies with known vulnerabilities using security-checker

Python

  • python-bandit: Scans for common security issues in Python code with bandit.
  • python-piprot: Scans python dependencies for out of date packages with piprot
  • python-safety: Checks python dependencies for known security vulnerabilities with the safety tool.

Ruby

  • ruby-brakeman: Statically analyzes Rails code for security issues with Brakeman.
  • ruby-bundler-scan: Scan for Ruby gems with known vulnerabilities using bundler

Adding a module

If you have an idea for a module, please feel free open a feature request in the issues section. If you have a bit of time left, please consider sending us a pull request. To see modules work, please head over to the modules folder to find how things are working.

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