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## Global Docker image parameters
## Please, note that this will override the image parameters, including dependencies, configured to use the global value
## Current available global Docker image parameters: imageRegistry and imagePullSecrets
##
# global:
# imageRegistry: myRegistryName
# imagePullSecrets:
# - myRegistryKeySecretName
## Bitnami WordPress image version
## ref: https://hub.docker.com/r/bitnami/wordpress/tags/
##
image:
registry: docker.io
repository: bitnami/wordpress
tag: 5.1.1
## Specify a imagePullPolicy
## Defaults to 'Always' if image tag is 'latest', else set to 'IfNotPresent'
## ref: http://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/images/#pre-pulling-images
##
pullPolicy: IfNotPresent
## Optionally specify an array of imagePullSecrets.
## Secrets must be manually created in the namespace.
## ref: https://kubernetes.io/docs/tasks/configure-pod-container/pull-image-private-registry/
##
# pullSecrets:
# - myRegistryKeySecretName
## User of the application
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
##
wordpressUsername: user
## Application password
## Defaults to a random 10-character alphanumeric string if not set
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
##
# wordpressPassword:
## Admin email
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
##
wordpressEmail: user@example.com
## First name
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
##
wordpressFirstName: FirstName
## Last name
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
##
wordpressLastName: LastName
## Blog name
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
##
wordpressBlogName: User's Blog!
## Table prefix
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
##
wordpressTablePrefix: wp_
## Skip wizard installation (only if you use an external database that already contains WordPress data)
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#connect-wordpress-docker-container-to-an-existing-database
##
wordpressSkipInstall: "no"
## Set to `false` to allow the container to be started with blank passwords
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress#environment-variables
allowEmptyPassword: true
## Set Apache allowOverride to None
allowOverrideNone: "no"
# ConfigMap with custom wordpress-htaccess.conf file (requires allowOverrideNone to true)
customHTAccessCM:
## SMTP mail delivery configuration
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-wordpress/#smtp-configuration
##
# smtpHost:
# smtpPort:
# smtpUser:
# smtpPassword:
# smtpUsername:
# smtpProtocol:
replicaCount: 1
externalDatabase:
## All of these values are only used when mariadb.enabled is set to false
## Database host
host: localhost
## non-root Username for Wordpress Database
user: bn_wordpress
## Database password
password: ""
## Database name
database: bitnami_wordpress
## Database port number
port: 3306
##
## MariaDB chart configuration
##
## https://github.com/helm/charts/blob/master/stable/mariadb/values.yaml
##
mariadb:
## Whether to deploy a mariadb server to satisfy the applications database requirements. To use an external database set this to false and configure the externalDatabase parameters
enabled: true
## Disable MariaDB replication
replication:
enabled: false
## Create a database and a database user
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-mariadb/blob/master/README.md#creating-a-database-user-on-first-run
##
db:
name: bitnami_wordpress
user: bn_wordpress
## If the password is not specified, mariadb will generates a random password
##
# password:
## MariaDB admin password
## ref: https://github.com/bitnami/bitnami-docker-mariadb/blob/master/README.md#setting-the-root-password-on-first-run
##
# rootUser:
# password:
## Enable persistence using Persistent Volume Claims
## ref: http://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/persistent-volumes/
##
master:
persistence:
enabled: true
## mariadb data Persistent Volume Storage Class
## If defined, storageClassName: <storageClass>
## If set to "-", storageClassName: "", which disables dynamic provisioning
## If undefined (the default) or set to null, no storageClassName spec is
## set, choosing the default provisioner. (gp2 on AWS, standard on
## GKE, AWS & OpenStack)
##
# storageClass: "-"
accessMode: ReadWriteOnce
size: 8Gi
## Kubernetes configuration
## For minikube, set this to NodePort, elsewhere use LoadBalancer or ClusterIP
##
service:
type: LoadBalancer
# HTTP Port
port: 80
# HTTPS Port
httpsPort: 443
##
## nodePorts:
## http: <to set explicitly, choose port between 30000-32767>
## https: <to set explicitly, choose port between 30000-32767>
nodePorts:
http: ""
https: ""
## Enable client source IP preservation
## ref http://kubernetes.io/docs/tasks/access-application-cluster/create-external-load-balancer/#preserving-the-client-source-ip
##
externalTrafficPolicy: Cluster
annotations: {}
## Extra ports to expose (normally used with the `sidecar` value)
# extraPorts:
## Allow health checks to be pointed at the https port
healthcheckHttps: false
## Configure extra options for liveness and readiness probes
## ref: https://kubernetes.io/docs/tasks/configure-pod-container/configure-liveness-readiness-probes/#configure-probes)
livenessProbe:
initialDelaySeconds: 120
periodSeconds: 10
timeoutSeconds: 5
failureThreshold: 6
successThreshold: 1
readinessProbe:
initialDelaySeconds: 30
periodSeconds: 10
timeoutSeconds: 5
failureThreshold: 6
successThreshold: 1
## If using an HTTPS-terminating load-balancer, the probes may need to behave
## like the balancer to prevent HTTP 302 responses. According to the Kubernetes
## docs, 302 should be considered "successful", but this issue on GitHub
## (https://github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/issues/47893) shows that it isn't.
# livenessProbeHeaders:
# - name: X-Forwarded-Proto
# value: https
# readinessProbeHeaders:
# - name: X-Forwarded-Proto
# value: https
## Configure the ingress resource that allows you to access the
## WordPress installation. Set up the URL
## ref: http://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/ingress/
##
ingress:
## Set to true to enable ingress record generation
enabled: false
## Set this to true in order to add the corresponding annotations for cert-manager
certManager: false
## Ingress annotations done as key:value pairs
## For a full list of possible ingress annotations, please see
## ref: https://github.com/kubernetes/ingress-nginx/blob/master/docs/annotations.md
##
## If tls is set to true, annotation ingress.kubernetes.io/secure-backends: "true" will automatically be set
## If certManager is set to true, annotation kubernetes.io/tls-acme: "true" will automatically be set
annotations:
# kubernetes.io/ingress.class: nginx
## The list of hostnames to be covered with this ingress record.
## Most likely this will be just one host, but in the event more hosts are needed, this is an array
hosts:
- name: wordpress.local
path: /
## The tls configuration for the ingress
## see: https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/services-networking/ingress/#tls
tls:
- hosts:
- wordpress.local
secretName: wordpress.local-tls
secrets:
## If you're providing your own certificates, please use this to add the certificates as secrets
## key and certificate should start with -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE----- or
## -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
##
## name should line up with a tlsSecret set further up
## If you're using cert-manager, this is unneeded, as it will create the secret for you if it is not set
##
## It is also possible to create and manage the certificates outside of this helm chart
## Please see README.md for more information
# - name: wordpress.local-tls
# key:
# certificate:
## Enable persistence using Persistent Volume Claims
## ref: http://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/persistent-volumes/
##
persistence:
enabled: true
## wordpress data Persistent Volume Storage Class
## If defined, storageClassName: <storageClass>
## If set to "-", storageClassName: "", which disables dynamic provisioning
## If undefined (the default) or set to null, no storageClassName spec is
## set, choosing the default provisioner. (gp2 on AWS, standard on
## GKE, AWS & OpenStack)
##
# storageClass: "-"
##
## If you want to reuse an existing claim, you can pass the name of the PVC using
## the existingClaim variable
# existingClaim: your-claim
accessMode: ReadWriteOnce
size: 10Gi
## Configure resource requests and limits
## ref: http://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/compute-resources/
##
resources:
requests:
memory: 512Mi
cpu: 300m
## Node labels for pod assignment
## Ref: https://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/node-selection/
##
nodeSelector: {}
## Tolerations for pod assignment
## Ref: https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/configuration/taint-and-toleration/
##
tolerations: []
## Affinity for pod assignment
## Ref: https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/configuration/assign-pod-node/#affinity-and-anti-affinity
##
affinity: {}
## Pod annotations
## ref: https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/overview/working-with-objects/annotations/
##
podAnnotations: {}
## Prometheus Exporter / Metrics
##
metrics:
enabled: false
image:
registry: docker.io
repository: lusotycoon/apache-exporter
tag: v0.5.0
pullPolicy: IfNotPresent
## Optionally specify an array of imagePullSecrets.
## Secrets must be manually created in the namespace.
## ref: https://kubernetes.io/docs/tasks/configure-pod-container/pull-image-private-registry/
##
# pullSecrets:
# - myRegistryKeySecretName
## Metrics exporter pod Annotation and Labels
podAnnotations:
prometheus.io/scrape: "true"
prometheus.io/port: "9117"
## Metrics exporter resource requests and limits
## ref: http://kubernetes.io/docs/user-guide/compute-resources/
##
# resources: {}
sidecars:
## Add sidecars to the pod.
## e.g.
# - name: your-image-name
# image: your-image
# imagePullPolicy: Always
# ports:
# - name: portname
# containerPort: 1234
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