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…service restart

When a service restarted or upgraded to a new version the polling of an already running highstate is interrupted.
During the restart of the flow currently the service would try to initiate the highstate but it would fail, as there is an already running one.
There was a mitigation attempt to get the already running highstate's JID and use `jobs.lookup_jid` to get information about it.
Unfortunately while a highstate is running the above command fails with `Minion did not return` error.
To handle these restarts more gracefully, before submitting a new task to SaltStack, with this change we will check if there is an already running job.
This is done using `jobs.active` call. If it returns there is something running, the service won't submit the new job, will leave it in not started state
and throw a `CloudbreakOrchestratorInProgressException`. This means these cases won't be handled as an error by the framework but as normal prograss.
After the already running job is finished, the queued one would be started and polled as usual. As this should be the same as the already finished one,
we expect it to finish in a very short time and don't cause any timeout issues.

Tested with unit test and manually on a local dev environment.
10bdea3

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Cloudbreak

Maintainability Build Automated Build Pulls Licence

Local Development Setup

As of now this document focuses on setting up your development environment on macOS. You'll need Homebrew to install certain components in case you don't have them already. To get Homebrew please follow the install instructions on the Homebrew homepage: https://brew.sh

As a prerequisite, you need to have Java 11 installed. You can choose from many options, including the Oracle JDK, Oracle OpenJDK, or an OpenJDK from any of several providers. For help in choosing your JDK, consult Java is Still Free.

You'll need Docker. For Mac, use Docker Desktop for Mac. Please allocate at least 6 CPU and 12 GB Memory to the process. (Depends on that how many service running in your IntelliJ and in Docker containers)

Cloudbreak Deployer

The simplest way to setup the working environment to be able to start Cloudbreak on your local machine is to use the Cloudbreak Deployer.

First you need to create a sandbox directory which will store the necessary configuration files and dependencies of Cloudbreak Deployer. This directory must be created outside of the cloned Cloudbreak git repository:

mkdir cbd-local
cd cbd-local

The next step is to download the latest cloudbreak-deployer onto your machine:

curl -s https://raw.githubusercontent.com/hortonworks/cloudbreak-deployer/master/install-dev | sh && cbd --version

Add the following to the file named Profile under the cbd-local directory you have just created. Please note, when a cbd command is executed you should go to the deployment's directory where your Profile file is found (cbd-local in our example). The CB_SCHEMA_SCRIPTS_LOCATION environment variable configures the location of SQL scripts that are in the core/src/main/resources/schema directory in the cloned Cloudbreak git repository.

Please note that the full path needs to be configured and env variables like $USER cannot be used. You also have to set a password for your local Cloudbreak in UAA_DEFAULT_USER_PW:

export CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST=
export UAA_DEFAULT_SECRET=cbsecret2015
export CB_SCHEMA_SCRIPTS_LOCATION=/Users/YOUR_USERNAME/YOUR_PROJECT_DIR/cloudbreak/core/src/main/resources/schema
export ENVIRONMENT_SCHEMA_SCRIPTS_LOCATION=/Users/YOUR_USERNAME/YOUR_PROJECT_DIR/environment/src/main/resources/schema
export ULU_SUBSCRIBE_TO_NOTIFICATIONS=true
export CB_INSTANCE_UUID=$(uuidgen | tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]')
export CB_INSTANCE_NODE_ID=5743e6ed-3409-420b-b08b-f688f2fc5db1
export PUBLIC_IP=localhost
export VAULT_AUTO_UNSEAL=true
export DPS_VERSION=2.0.0.0-142

If you want to save some memory then some of the service can be skipped in local runs like:

export CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST=periscope,distrox-api,jaeger,environments2-api,datalake-api

If you are using AWS, then also add the following lines, substituting your control plane AWS account id, and the AWS credentials that you have created for the CB role.

export CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID="YOUR_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID"
export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID="YOUR_ACCESS_KEY"
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY="YOUR_SECRET_KEY"

At first, you should start every service from cbd to check that your cloud environment is set up correctly.

export CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST=

When this setup works, you can remove services from cbd, and run them locally. For example, in order to run Cloudbreak, Periscope, Datalake, FreeIPA, Redbeams, Environment, Thunderhead Mock (and Thunderhead API), IDBroker Mapping Management, and Environments2 API services locally (from IDEA or the command line), put this into your Profile:

export CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST=cloudbreak,periscope,datalake,freeipa,redbeams,environment,thunderhead-mock,thunderhead-api,idbmms,environments2-api

Containers for these applications won't be started and Uluwatu (or the cdp & dp CLI tools) will connect to Java processes running on your host. You don't have to put all of the applications into local-dev mode; the value of the variable could be any combination.

You need to login to DockerHub:

docker login

And then provide your username and password.

Then run these commands:

cbd start
cbd logs cloudbreak

In case you see org.apache.ibatis.migration.MigrationException at the end of the logs run these commands to fix the DB and the re-run the previous section (cbd start and logs):

cbd migrate cbdb up
cbd migrate cbdb pending

For some reason if you encounter a similar problem with Periscope, Datalake, FreeIPA, Redbeams, or Environment, then run the following commands and you can restart the Cloudbreak Deployer:

cbd migrate periscopedb up
cbd migrate periscopedb pending

cbd migrate datalakedb up
cbd migrate datalakedb pending

cbd migrate freeipadb up
cbd migrate freeipadb pending

cbd migrate redbeamsdb up
cbd migrate redbeamsdb pending

cbd migrate environmentdb up
cbd migrate environmentdb pending

You can track any other application's logs to check the results by executing the following command:

cbd logs periscope # or datalake, freeipa, redbeams, environment, thunderhead-mock, idbmms, environments2-api

If everything went well then Cloudbreak will be available on https://localhost. For more details and config parameters please check the documentation of Cloudbreak Deployer.

The deployer has generated a certs directory under cbd-local directory which will be needed later on to set up IDEA properly.

If not already present, you shall create an etc directory under cbd-local directory and place your Cloudera Manager license file license.txt there. This is essential for Thunderhead Mock to start successfully. (Request a licence from us)

Cloudbreak service ports

When cloudbreak is started in a container, the port it listens on is 8080. If "cloudbreak" is added to the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, all services expect the cloudbreak port to be 9091.

Linux difference

Cloudbreak Deployer is unable to determine the IP address on a Linux machine. Therefore, you must add in the public IP address manually to your Profile.

export PUBLIC_IP=127.0.0.1

IDEA

Check out the Cloudbreak repository

Go to https://github.com/hortonworks/cloudbreak, either clone or download the repository, use SSH which is described here: https://help.github.com/articles/connecting-to-github-with-ssh/

Important: update ~/.gradle/gradle.properties file with the two following properties in order to download artifacts from the internal repository. You can find the details on our Wiki page.

  • defaultCmPrivateRepoUser
  • defaultCmPrivateRepoPassword

Project settings in IDEA

In IDEA set your SDK to your Java version under:

Set project SDK

File -> Project Structure -> Project Settings -> Project -> Project SDK -> 11

Set project Language level

File -> Project Structure -> Project Settings -> Project -> Project Language Level -> 11

Set Gradle JVM

IntelliJ IDEA -> Preferences -> Build, Execution, Deployment -> Gradle -> Gradle JVM -> 11

Import project

Cloudbreak can be imported into IDEA as a Gradle project by specifying the cloudbreak repo root under Import Project. Once it is done, you need to import the proper code formatter by using the File -> Import Settings... menu and selecting the idea_settings.jar located in the config/idea directory in the Cloudbreak git repository.

Also you need to import inspection settings called inpsections.xml located in config/idea:

IntelliJ IDEA -> Preferences -> Editor -> Inspections -> Settings icon -> Import Profile

Cloudbreak integrates with GRPC components. This results in generated files inside the project with big file sizes. By default IDEA ignores anything that is more than 8MB, resulting in unknown classes inside the IDEA context. To circumvent this, you need to add this property to your IDEA properties.

Go to Help -> Edit Custom Properties..., then insert

#parse files up until 15MB
idea.max.intellisense.filesize=15000

Restart IDEA, and Rebuild.

Activating CloudBreak Code Styles

After importing, be sure to navigate to:

IntelliJ IDEA -> Preferences -> Editor -> Code Style -> Java -> Scheme

And, select the new scheme Default (1).

Otherwise, IntelliJ will constantly reorder your imports differently from CB conventions.

Running Cloudbreak in IDEA

To launch the Cloudbreak application execute the com.sequenceiq.cloudbreak.CloudbreakApplication class (set Use classpath of module to cloudbreak.core.main) with the following JVM options:

-Dcb.db.port.5432.tcp.addr=localhost
-Dcb.db.port.5432.tcp.port=5432
-Dserver.port=9091
-Daltus.ums.host=localhost
-Dvault.addr=localhost
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN>
-Dcb.enabledplatforms=""
-Dinstance.node.id=<NODE_ID>

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN from the Profile file and <NODE_ID> with some value e.g.: CB-1

Note that if you're upgrading from 2.16 (or earlier) to master you may have to set this value in the database also to ensure the flow restart functionality for progressing cluster(s)

You can set this by executing the following SQL on the cbdb database:

UPDATE flowlog 
SET cloudbreaknodeid = 'YOUR_NODE_ID_VALUE';

Where the YOUR_NODE_ID_VALUE value must be the same what you provide in the cloudbreak run configuration mentioned above.

Afterward add these entries to the environment variables (the same values the you set in Profile):

AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=
AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=
CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=

The database migration scripts are run automatically by Cloudbreak, but this migration can be turned off with the -Dcb.schema.migration.auto=false JVM option.

Configure Before launch task

In order to be able to determine the local Cloudbreak and FreeIPA version automatically, a Before launch task has to be configured for the project in IntelliJ IDEA. The required steps are the following:

  1. Open Run/Debug Configurations for the project
  2. Select your project's application
  3. Click on Add in the Before launch panel
  4. Select Run Gradle Task with the following parameters
    1. Gradle project: cloudbreak:core or cloudbreak:freeipa depending on the service
    2. Tasks: buildInfo
  5. Confirm and restart the application

Running Periscope in IDEA

After importing the cloudbreak repo root, launch the Periscope application by executing the com.sequenceiq.periscope.PeriscopeApplication class (set Use classpath of module to cloudbreak.autoscale.main) with the following JVM options:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the periscope.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
-Dperiscope.db.port.5432.tcp.addr=localhost
-Dperiscope.db.port.5432.tcp.port=5432
-Dperiscope.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080
-Dserver.port=8085
-Daltus.ums.host=localhost
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN>
-Dinstance.node.id=<NODE_ID>

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> and <NODE_ID> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN and CB_INSTANCE_NODE_ID respectively from the Profile file.

Running Datalake in IDEA

After importing the cloudbreak repo root, launch the Datalake application by executing the com.sequenceiq.datalake.DatalakeApplication class (set Use classpath of module to cloudbreak.datalake.main) with the following JVM options:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the datalake.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
-Dserver.port=8086
-Dcb.enabledplatforms=AWS,AZURE,MOCK
-Ddatalake.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN>
-Dvault.addr=localhost
-Dinstance.node.id=<NODE_ID>

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> and <NODE_ID> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN and CB_INSTANCE_NODE_ID respectively from the Profile file.

Running FreeIPA in IDEA

After importing the cloudbreak repo root, launch the FreeIPA application by executing the com.sequenceiq.freeipa.FreeIpaApplication class (set Use classpath of module to cloudbreak.freeipa.main) with the following JVM options:

-Dfreeipa.db.addr=localhost
-Dserver.port=8090
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN>
-Dinstance.node.id=<NODE_ID>

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> and <NODE_ID> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN and CB_INSTANCE_NODE_ID respectively from the Profile file.

then add these entries to the environment variables (the same values the you set in Profile):

AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=
AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=
CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=

Running Redbeams in IDEA

After importing the cloudbreak repo root, launch the Redbeams application by executing the com.sequenceiq.redbeams.RedbeamsApplication class (set Use classpath of module to cloudbreak.redbeams.main) with the following JVM options:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the redbeams.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
-Dredbeams.db.port.5432.tcp.addr=localhost
-Dredbeams.db.port.5432.tcp.port=5432
-Dredbeams.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080
-Dserver.port=8087
-Daltus.ums.host=localhost
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN>
-Dcb.enabledplatforms=AWS,AZURE,MOCK
-Dinstance.node.id=<NODE_ID>

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> and <NODE_ID> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN and CB_INSTANCE_NODE_ID respectively from the Profile file.

then add these entries to the environment variables (the same values the you set in Profile):

AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=
AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=
CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=

Running the Environment service in IDEA

After importing the cloudbreak repo root, launch the Environment application by executing the com.sequenceiq.environment.EnvironmentApplication class (set Use classpath of module to cloudbreak.environment.main) with the following JVM options:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the environment.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN>
-Denvironment.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080
-Denvironment.enabledplatforms="YARN,YCLOUD,AWS,AZURE,MOCK"
-Dinstance.node.id=<NODE_ID>

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> and <NODE_ID> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN and CB_INSTANCE_NODE_ID respectively from the Profile file.

then add these entries to the environment variables (the same values the you set in Profile):

AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=
AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=
CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=

Running Thunderhead Mock in IDEA

After importing the cloudbreak repo root, launch the Thunderhead Mock application by executing the com.sequenceiq.thunderhead.MockThunderheadApplication class (set Use classpath of module to cloudbreak.mock-thunderhead.main) with the following JVM options:

-Dauth.config.dir=<CBD_LOCAL_ETC>

Replace <CBD_LOCAL_ETC> with the full path of your cbd-local/etc directory that shall already contain the Cloudera Manager license file license.txt.

Please make sure that thunderhead-api has also been added to CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST list in Profile file of cbd (besides thunderhead-mock).

Command line

Running Cloudbreak from the Command Line

To run Cloudbreak from the command line first set the the AWS environment variables (use the same values as in Profile)

export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=...
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=...
export CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=...

Set the CM repository credentials in order to download artifacts from the internal repository. Ask us for details in the #eng_cb_dev_internal Slack channel.

export CM_PRIVATE_REPO_USER=
export CM_PRIVATE_REPO_PASSWORD=

then run the following Gradle command:

./gradlew :core:buildInfo :core:bootRun --no-daemon -PjvmArgs="-Dcb.db.port.5432.tcp.addr=localhost \
-Dcb.db.port.5432.tcp.port=5432 \
-Dcb.schema.scripts.location=$(pwd)/core/src/main/resources/schema
-Dserver.port=9091 \
-Daltus.ums.host=localhost
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN>
-Dspring.config.location=$(pwd)/core/src/main/resources/application.yml,$(pwd)/core/src/main/resources/application-dev.yml,$(pwd)/core/build/resources/main/application.properties"

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN from the Profile file.

The database migration scripts are run automatically by Cloudbreak, this migration can be turned off with the -Dcb.schema.migration.auto=false JVM option.

Running Periscope from the Command Line

To run Periscope from the command line, run the following Gradle command:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the periscope.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
./gradlew :autoscale:bootRun -PjvmArgs="-Dperiscope.db.port.5432.tcp.addr=localhost \
-Dperiscope.db.port.5432.tcp.port=5432 \
-Dperiscope.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080 \
-Dperiscope.schema.scripts.location=$(pwd)/autoscale/src/main/resources/schema
-Dserver.port=8085 \
-Daltus.ums.host=localhost \
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> \
-Dspring.config.location=$(pwd)/autoscale/src/main/resources/application.yml,$(pwd)/autoscale/build/resources/main/application.properties"

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN from the Profile file.

Running Datalake from the Command Line

To run Datalake from the command line, run the following Gradle command:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the datalake.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
./gradlew :datalake:bootRun -PjvmArgs="-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> \
-Dserver.port=8086 \
-Ddatalake.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080
-Dspring.config.location=$(pwd)/datalake/src/main/resources/application.yml,$(pwd)/datalake/build/resources/main/application.properties"

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN from the Profile file.

Running FreeIPA from the Command Line

To run the FreeIPA management service from the command line first set the the AWS environment variables (use the same values as in Profile)

export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=...
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=...
export CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=...

then run the following Gradle command:

./gradlew :freeipa:bootRun --no-daemon -PjvmArgs="-Dfreeipa.db.addr=localhost \
-Dserver.port=8090 \
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> \
-Dspring.config.location=$(pwd)/freeipa/src/main/resources/application.yml,$(pwd)/freeipa/src/main/resources/application-dev.yml,$(pwd)/freeipa/build/resources/main/application.properties"

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN from the Profile file.

Running Redbeams from the Command Line

To run the Redbeams from the command line first set the the AWS environment variables (use the same values as in Profile)

export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=...
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=...
export CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=...

then run the following Gradle command:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the redbeams.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
./gradlew :redbeams:bootRun --no-daemon -PjvmArgs="-Dredbeams.db.port.5432.tcp.addr=localhost \
-Dredbeams.db.port.5432.tcp.port=5432 \
-Dredbeams.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080 \
-Dredbeams.schema.scripts.location=$(pwd)/redbeams/src/main/resources/schema \
-Dserver.port=8087 \
-Daltus.ums.host=localhost \
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> \
-Dspring.config.location=$(pwd)/redbeams/src/main/resources/application.yml,$(pwd)/redbeams/build/resources/main/application.properties"

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN from the Profile file.

Running the Environment service from the Command Line

To run the Environment service from the command line first set the the AWS environment variables (use the same values as in Profile)

export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=...
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=...
export CB_AWS_ACCOUNT_ID=...

then run the following Gradle command:

  • Note: If cloudbreak is in the CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST variable, the environment.cloudbreak.url should be http://localhost:9091
./gradlew :environment:bootRun -PjvmArgs="\
-Denvironment.cloudbreak.url=http://localhost:8080 \
-Dvault.root.token=<VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> \
-Dspring.config.location=$(pwd)/environment/src/main/resources/application.yml,$(pwd)/environment/build/resources/main/application.properties"

Replace <VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN> with the value of VAULT_ROOT_TOKEN from the Profile file.

Running Thunderhead Mock from the Command Line

To run Thunderhead Mock from the command line, run the following Gradle command:

./gradlew :mock-thunderhead:bootRun -PjvmArgs="\
-Dserver.port=10080 \
-Dauth.config.dir=<CBD_LOCAL_ETC> \
-Dspring.config.location=$(pwd)/mock-thunderhead/src/main/resources/application.yml"

Replace <CBD_LOCAL_ETC> with the full path of your cbd-local/etc directory that shall already contain the Cloudera Manager license file license.txt.

Please make sure that thunderhead-api has also been added to CB_LOCAL_DEV_LIST list in Profile file of cbd (besides thunderhead-mock).

Database development

If any schema change is required in Cloudbreak services databases (cbdb / periscopedb / datalakedb / redbeamsdb / environmentdb / freeipadb), then the developer needs to write SQL scripts to migrate the database accordingly. The schema migration is managed by MyBatis Migrations in Cloudbreak and the cbd tool provides an easy-to-use wrapper for it. The syntax for using the migration commands is cbd migrate <database name> <command> [parameters] e.g. cbd migrate cbdb status. Create a SQL template for schema changes:

cbd migrate cbdb new "CLOUD-123 schema change for new feature"

As as result of the above command an SQL file template is generated under the path specified in CB_SCHEMA_SCRIPTS_LOCATION environment variable, which is defined in Profile. The structure of the generated SQL template looks like the following:

-- // CLOUD-123 schema change for new feature
-- Migration SQL that makes the change goes here.



-- //@UNDO
-- SQL to undo the change goes here.

Once you have implemented your SQLs then you can execute them with:

cbd migrate <database-name> up

Make sure pending SQLs to run as well:

cbd migrate <database-name> pending

If you would like to rollback the last SQL file, then just use the down command:

cbd migrate <database-name> down

On order to check the status of database

cbd migrate <database-name> status

#Every script that has not been executed will be marked as ...pending... in the output of status command:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- MyBatis Migrations - status
------------------------------------------------------------------------
ID             Applied At          Description
================================================================================
20150421140021 2015-07-08 10:04:28 create changelog
20150421150000 2015-07-08 10:04:28 CLOUD-607 create baseline schema
20150507121756 2015-07-08 10:04:28 CLOUD-576 change instancegrouptype hostgroup to core
20151008090632    ...pending...    CLOUD-123 schema change for new feature

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Building

Gradle is used for build and dependency management. The Gradle wrapper is added to the Cloudbreak git repository, so building can be done with:

./gradlew clean build

How to reach CM UI directly(not through Knox)

With the current design on the cluster's gateway node there is an NGiNX which is responsible for routing requests through Knox by default. But there are cases when the CM UI needs to be reached directly. It is possible on the same port by the same NGiNX on the clouderamanager/ path of the provisioned cluster. Please note that the trailing slash is significant for the routing to work.

For example: https://tb-nt-local.tb-local.xcu2-8y8x.workload-dev.cloudera.com/clouderamanager/

Be aware of that this routing mechanism is based on cookies, so if you have problems to reach the CM UI directly especially when you reached any service through Knox previously then the deletion of cookies could solve your issues.

How to contribute

I would like to start by the warm welcome if you would like to contribute to our project, making our - and from the point of contribution, it's yours also - goals closer.

We're happy for having your helpful intention to make this project greater than ever, but for this, I'd like to introduce you to some of our guidelines that you should follow for a successful contribution.

When you would like to make a contribution you can do that by opening pull request against the desired version, but along with some very suggested guidelines not just for the sake of understandability but for having a properly combined request.

Appearance

First, let's start with the appearance. At the time of this writing, we don't enforce any formal requirements to the pull request message by any kind of tool, but we have the following strongly recommended guidelines:

  • if your commit message/jira description fits into a Twitter message then probably, it is too short, and might not be clear what is the intention there
  • if it contains words like: fix or handle then probably you should consider some rewording, but of course, sometimes it is acceptable
  • if your commit fixes something obvious, e.g, a compile error, then of course you don’t need to write a long description about why it is a good idea to fix a compile error
  • compared to a 200-1000 lines of code change (which is the size of our average commit), adding a few more lines into the commit message/jira description is just a tiny effort but would make a huge difference

We were talking about what we should avoid, but let's see a few good examples, which helps the reviewer to understand the purpose of that commit:

https://github.com/hortonworks/cloudbreak/commit/56fdde5c6f48f48a378b505a170b3e3d83225c85

https://github.com/hortonworks/cloudbreak/commit/d09b0074c45af209ccf34855dcf4c1f34c3ccebb

https://github.com/hortonworks/cloudbreak/commit/c93b91fd6a08de7516ab763098f2dcd3abc149f0

https://github.com/hortonworks/cloudbreak/commit/f50f5c8f38941db958eac27c663ae00ecba7b0f5

Coding guidelines

  • If you introduce a new Cloud SDK or API for a feature, please ensure that the newly introduced API calls are supported in every region and if not then search for an alternative solution. It is often the case that the cloud providers gradually introduce their new services.

Catching up

When you're working on your precious change on your beloved branch and all of a sudden you face the issue of getting your branch drop behind from the desired/initial branch where you would like to open your future pull request, our way of catching up is rebasing.

If you're experiencing this quite common then the good practice would be fetching and rebasing the initial branch multiple times in a day because there are periods of times when dozens of changes are landing on different branches. I agree, sometimes (especially when someone is working on a huge change) continuously rebasing our branch could be could really be a pain in the bottom, but this practice ensures that we're submitting our commits in proper order and way.

In addition, please do not merge branches together if you can solve your problem with rebasing, and even if you think that your change would have no impact on the codebase, or the actual collection of functionalities - if you're not from our team or don't have written permission from one of our team members - please never ever push directly anything to the master branch normally and especially not by force.

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CDP Public Cloud is an integrated analytics and data management platform deployed on cloud services. It offers broad data analytics and artificial intelligence functionality along with secure user access and data governance features.

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