Render a template (partial) and easily override any of the components of the template
Ruby
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
lib
rails
test
.document
.gitignore
.ruby-version
Gemfile
Gemfile.lock
LICENSE.txt
README.rdoc
Rakefile
with_template.gemspec

README.rdoc

with_template

WithTemplate takes the concept of Blocks and adds templating to it. You specify a particular partial to render, and then maintain the ability to control how it renders from outside the template.

This allows you to very easily build reusable UI components. This is best demonstrated through examples.

Installation

To install, add the following to the Gemfile:

gem install 'with_template'

Note (12/14/15)

I am in the process of doing a full rewrite of this readme file to include better examples, and better description of the features including new features that have not been documented yet.

Example 1: TableFor

The TableFor was built by extending WithTemplate. Using a partial that defines a series of blocks (See here), the user of the table builder is passed in a collection of records and specifies exactly which columns to render in the table.

The columns can correspond to fields are the records, methods to be invoked, or the user can specify exactly what should be rendered in the column. Additionally, the headers can be overridden, any any component of the table can be replaced should the user not like how the table renders. A simple example would be:

<%= table_for @users, :table_html => {:class => "table table-hover table-bordered"} do |table| %>
  <% table.column :id, :header => false %>
  <% table.column :full_name do |user| %>
    <%= "#{user.first_name} #{user.last_name}" %>
  <% end %>
  <% table.footer do %>
    <div class="pull-right">
      <%= will_paginate @users %>
    </div>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

Example 2: Shared Layouts

Say you wanted to wanted to create the following three layouts for your application: 1) a single full-width column 2) two columns, one that is a fourth of the page, and one that is three fourths of the page. 3) three columns, each a third of the page

To accomplish this, you may find yourself copying and pasting code between layouts, such as the head tag, any meta tags, javascript includes, stylesheet links, navigation bar, the footer, and any components shared across all pages.

Perhaps you typically take this approach, or maybe you render a partial that you pass local variables to that are used within the partial to conditionally render output.

I’d like to propose a third solution: use with_template.

With with_template, you specify what template (really just a partial) to render and a block that can be used to override definitions within the partial, control what gets rendered and in what order, or the block itself can be rendered in the partial.

With the above example, we could define a single partial, something like app/layouts/_shared_layout.html.erb (Note: If you aren't familiar with the Blocks gem, I highly recommend checking out the documentation first):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  <head>
  <!-- meta tags -->
    <title>
      <%= blocks.render :title do %>
        My App
      <% end %>
    </title>
    <%= csrf_meta_tags %>
    <%= blocks.render :stylesheets do %>
      <%= stylesheet_link_tag "application", :media => "all" %>
    <% end %>
    <!-- Additional <head> content -->
  </head>
  <body>
    <%= blocks.render_with_partials :navbar %>
    <div class="main">
      <div class="container">
        <div class="row">
          <div class="col-md-12">
            <%= bootstrap_flash %>
          </div>
          <%= captured_block %>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
    <%= blocks.render :footer do %>
      <%= render "blocks/footer" %>
    <% end %>
    <%= blocks.render :javascripts do %>
      <%= include_gon %>
      <%= javascript_include_tag "application" %>
    <% end %>
  </body>
</html>

Here we've defined a template of code that can be shared amongst all layouts. Where the individual layouts differ, there are several hooks that have been added to the template that provide convenient ways of adding code blocks or replacing the way others render. In the above code, we call “blocks.render” and “blocks.render_with_partials” in a couple of different places. These allow us, from outside the template, to specify code to render before any of those blocks, after any of those blocks, or replace any of those blocks. We'll get to that shortly.

Using the above partial, we can now very easily define the 3 layouts defined above:

<!-- app/views/layout/one_column.html.erb -->
<%= with_template("layouts/shared_layout") do %>
  <div class="col-md-12">
    <%= yield %>
  </div>
<% end %>

<!-- app/views/layout/two_columns.html.erb -->
<%= with_template("layouts/shared_layout") do %>
  <%= blocks.render_with_partials :sidebar, :wrap_with => { :tag => :div, :class => "col-md-3 sidebar" } %>
  <div class="col-md-9">
    <%= yield %>
  </div>
<% end %>

<!-- app/views/layout/three_columns.html.erb -->
<%= with_template("layouts/shared_layout") do %>
  <%= blocks.render :column1, :wrap_with => { :tag => :div, :class => "col-md-4" } %>
  <%= blocks.render :column2, :wrap_with => { :tag => :div, :class => "col-md-4" } %>
  <%= blocks.render :column3, :wrap_with => { :tag => :div, :class => "col-md-4" } %>
<% end %>

Suppose we wanted to add a fourth layout for admins that used roughly the same code as the one column layout, but with some additional javascript and stylesheet files included. In the true spirit of DRY, this is exceptionally easy to do with WithTemplate:

<!-- app/views/layout/admin.html.erb -->
<% blocks.after :stylesheets do %>
  <%= stylesheet_link_tag "admin", :media => "all" %>
<% end %>

<% blocks.after :javascripts do %>
  <%= javascript_include_tag "admin" %>
<% end %>

<% blocks.define :title do %>
  Admin
<% end %>

<%= render :template => "layouts/one_column" %>

With those lines, we added in the admin javascript files, the admin stylesheets, set the title to “Admin”, and reused the basic one column layout. What if, instead of rendering the admin stylesheets and javascripts after the application stylesheets and javascripts, we wanted to flat out replace the application stylesheets and javascripts. Simple enough:

<!-- app/views/layout/admin.html.erb -->
<% blocks.define :stylesheets do %>
  <%= stylesheet_link_tag "admin", :media => "all" %>
<% end %>

<% blocks.define :javascripts do %>
  <%= javascript_include_tag "admin" %>
<% end %>

<% blocks.define :title do %>
  Admin
<% end %>

<%= render :template => "layouts/one_column" %>