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End-to-End Flow

The end-to-end verification provisions a sample Fabric network consisting of two organizations, each maintaining two peers, and a Kafka-based ordering service.

This verification makes use of two fundamental tools, which are necessary to create a functioning transactional network with digital signature validation and access control:

  • cryptogen - generates the x509 certificates used to identify and authenticate the various components in the network.
  • configtxgen - generates the requisite configuration artifacts for orderer bootstrap and channel creation.

Each tool consumes a configuration yaml file, within which we specify the topology of our network (cryptogen) and the location of our certificates for various configuration operations (configtxgen). Once the tools have been successfully run, we are able to launch our network. More detail on the tools and the structure of the network will be provided later in this document. For now, let's get going...

Prerequisites

On Windows machines you will also need the following which provides a better alternative to the Windows command prompt:

Note

On older versions of Windows, such as Windows 7, you typically get this as part of installing Docker Toolbox. However experience has shown this to be a poor development environment with limited functionality. It is suitable to run docker based scenarios, such as :doc:`getting_started`, but you may not be able to find a suitable make command to successfully go through the scenario described here.

Setting the $GOPATH

Make sure you have properly setup your Host's GOPATH environment variable. This is necessary for the code to compile properly.

Now create the following directory structure and cd into it:

mkdir -p $GOPATH/src/github.com/hyperledger
cd $GOPATH/src/github.com/hyperledger
  • Clone the Fabric code base into this path.
git clone http://gerrit.hyperledger.org/r/fabric

or though a mirrored repository in github:

git clone https://github.com/hyperledger/fabric.git
  • If you are running OSX, perform the following:
brew install gnu-tar --with-default-names
brew install libtool

Build the binaries

  • Now make the platform-specific binaries for cryptogen and configtxgen.
cd $GOPATH/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric
# ensure sure you are in the /fabric directory where the Makefile resides
make release

This will output platform-specific binaries into the fabric/release folder.

  • Next, make the Fabric images. This typically takes between five to ten minutes, so be patient:
# make sure you are in the /fabric directory
make docker

Execute a docker images command in your terminal. If the images compiled successfully, you should see an output similar to the following:

REPOSITORY                     TAG                   IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
hyperledger/fabric-couchdb     latest                e2df4dd39ca9        38 minutes ago      1.51 GB
hyperledger/fabric-couchdb     amd64-1.1.0           e2df4dd39ca9        38 minutes ago      1.51 GB
hyperledger/fabric-kafka       latest                08af4d797266        40 minutes ago      1.3 GB
hyperledger/fabric-kafka       amd64-1.1.0           08af4d797266        40 minutes ago      1.3 GB
hyperledger/fabric-zookeeper   latest                444e9e695367        40 minutes ago      1.31 GB
hyperledger/fabric-zookeeper   amd64-1.1.0           444e9e695367        40 minutes ago      1.31 GB
hyperledger/fabric-testenv     latest                8678d3101930        41 minutes ago      1.41 GB
hyperledger/fabric-testenv     amd64-1.1.0           8678d3101930        41 minutes ago      1.41 GB
hyperledger/fabric-buildenv    latest                60911392c82e        41 minutes ago      1.33 GB
hyperledger/fabric-buildenv    amd64-1.1.0           60911392c82e        41 minutes ago      1.33 GB
hyperledger/fabric-orderer     latest                2afab937b9cc        41 minutes ago      182 MB
hyperledger/fabric-orderer     amd64-1.1.0           2afab937b9cc        41 minutes ago      182 MB
hyperledger/fabric-peer        latest                9560e58e8089        41 minutes ago      185 MB
hyperledger/fabric-peer        amd64-1.1.0           9560e58e8089        41 minutes ago      185 MB
hyperledger/fabric-javaenv     latest                881ca5219fad        42 minutes ago      1.43 GB
hyperledger/fabric-javaenv     amd64-1.1.0           881ca5219fad        42 minutes ago      1.43 GB
hyperledger/fabric-ccenv       latest                28af77ffe9e9        43 minutes ago      1.29 GB
hyperledger/fabric-ccenv       amd64-1.1.0           28af77ffe9e9        43 minutes ago      1.29 GB
hyperledger/fabric-baseimage   amd64-0.4.8           f4751a503f02        3 months ago        1.27 GB
hyperledger/fabric-baseos      amd64-0.4.8           c3a4cf3b3350        3 months ago        161 MB

If you failed to compile the fabric-testenv image, then you can perform a make clean followed by another make docker.

Cryptogen Tool

We will use the cryptogen tool to generate the cryptographic material (x509 certs) for our various network entities. The certificates are based on a standard PKI implementation where validation is achieved by reaching a common trust anchor.

How does it work?

Cryptogen consumes a file - crypto-config.yaml - that contains the network topology and allows us to generate a library of certificates for both the Organizations and the components that belong to those Organizations. Each Organization is provisioned a unique root certificate (ca-cert), that binds specific components (peers and orderers) to that Org. Transactions and communications within Fabric are signed by an entity's private key (keystore), and then verified by means of a public key (signcerts). You will notice a "count" variable within this file. We use this to specify the number of peers per Organization; in our case it's two peers per Org. The rest of this template is extremely self-explanatory.

After we run the tool, the certs will be parked in a folder titled crypto-config.

Configuration Transaction Generator

The configtxgen tool is used to create four artifacts: orderer bootstrap block, fabric channel configuration transaction, and two anchor peer transactions - one for each Peer Org.

The orderer block is the genesis block for the ordering service, and the channel transaction file is broadcast to the orderer at channel creation time. The anchor peer transactions, as the name might suggest, specify each Org's anchor peer on this channel.

How does it work?

Configtxgen consumes a file - configtx.yaml - that contains the definitions for the sample network. There are three members - one Orderer Org (OrdererOrg) and two Peer Orgs (Org1 & Org2) each managing and maintaining two peer nodes. This file also specifies a consortium - SampleConsortium - consisting of our two Peer Orgs. Pay specific attention to the "Profiles" section at the top of this file. You will notice that we have two unique headers. One for the orderer genesis block - TwoOrgsOrdererGenesis - and one for our channel - TwoOrgsChannel. These headers are important, as we will pass them in as arguments when we create our artifacts. This file also contains two additional specifications that are worth noting. Firstly, we specify the anchor peers for each Peer Org (peer0.org1.example.com & peer0.org2.example.com). Secondly, we point to the location of the MSP directory for each member, in turn allowing us to store the root certificates for each Org in the orderer genesis block. This is a critical concept. Now any network entity communicating with the ordering service can have its digital signature verified.

For ease of use, a script - generateArtifacts.sh - is provided. The script will generate the crypto material and our four configuration artifacts, and subsequently output these files into the channel-artifacts folder.

Run the shell script

Make sure you are in the examples/e2e_cli directory where the script resides. Decide upon a unique name for your channel and replace the <channel-ID> parm with a name of your choice. The script will fail if you do not supply a name.

cd examples/e2e_cli
./generateArtifacts.sh <channel-ID>

The output of the script is somewhat verbose, as it generates the crypto libraries and multiple artifacts. However, you will notice five distinct and self-explanatory messages in your terminal. They are as follows:

##########################################################
##### Generate certificates using cryptogen tool #########
##########################################################

##########################################################
#########  Generating Orderer Genesis block ##############
##########################################################

#################################################################
### Generating channel configuration transaction 'channel.tx' ###
#################################################################

#################################################################
#######    Generating anchor peer update for Org0MSP   ##########
#################################################################

#################################################################
#######    Generating anchor peer update for Org1MSP   ##########
#################################################################

These configuration transactions will bundle the crypto material for the participating members and their network components and output an orderer genesis block and three channel transaction artifacts. These artifacts are required to successfully bootstrap a Fabric network and create a channel to transact upon.

Manually generate the artifacts (optional)

You can refer to the generateArtifacts.sh script for the commands, however for the sake of convenience we will also provide them here.

First, let's set the environment variable for our platform architecture. This command will detect your OS and use the appropriate binaries for the subsequent steps:

# for power or z
os_arch=$(echo "$(uname -s)-$(uname -m)" | awk '{print tolower($0)}')

# for linux, osx or windows
os_arch=$(echo "$(uname -s)-amd64" | awk '{print tolower($0)}')

Check to make sure it is set properly:

echo $os_arch

Now let's run the tool. Our platform specific binary is in the release directory, so we need to provide the relative path to where the tool resides. Make sure you are in examples/e2e_cli:

./../../release/$os_arch/bin/cryptogen generate --config=./crypto-config.yaml

You will likely see the following warning. It's innocuous, ignore it:

[bccsp] GetDefault -> WARN 001 Before using BCCSP, please call InitFactories(). Falling back to bootBCCSP.

Next, we need to tell the configtxgen tool where to look for the configtx.yaml file that it needs to ingest. We will tell it look in our present working directory:

FABRIC_CFG_PATH=$PWD

Create the orderer genesis block:

./../../release/$os_arch/bin/configtxgen -profile TwoOrgsOrdererGenesis -outputBlock ./channel-artifacts/genesis.block

You can ignore the logs regarding intermediate certs, we are not using them in this crypto implementation.

Create the channel transaction artifact:

# make sure to set the <channel-ID> parm
./../../release/$os_arch/bin/configtxgen -profile TwoOrgsChannel -outputCreateChannelTx ./channel-artifacts/channel.tx -channelID <channel-ID>

Define the anchor peer for Org1 on the channel:

# make sure to set the <channel-ID> parm
./../../release/$os_arch/bin/configtxgen -profile TwoOrgsChannel -outputAnchorPeersUpdate ./channel-artifacts/Org1MSPanchors.tx -channelID <channel-ID> -asOrg Org1MSP

Define the anchor peer for Org2 on the channel:

# make sure to set the <channel-ID> parm
./../../release/$os_arch/bin/configtxgen -profile TwoOrgsChannel -outputAnchorPeersUpdate ./channel-artifacts/Org2MSPanchors.tx -channelID <channel-ID> -asOrg Org2MSP

Run the end-to-end test with Docker

Make sure you are in the /e2e_cli directory. Then use docker-compose to spawn the network entities and drive the tests. Notice that you can set a TIMEOUT variable (specified in seconds) so that your cli container does not exit after the script completes. You can choose any value:

# the TIMEOUT variable is optional
CHANNEL_NAME=<channel-id> TIMEOUT=<pick_a_value> docker-compose -f docker-compose-cli.yaml up -d

If you created a unique channel name, be sure to pass in that parameter. For example,

CHANNEL_NAME=abc TIMEOUT=1000 docker-compose -f docker-compose-cli.yaml up -d

Wait, 60 seconds or so. Behind the scenes, there are transactions being sent to the peers. Execute a docker ps to view your active containers. You should see an output identical to the following:

CONTAINER ID        IMAGE                                 COMMAND                  CREATED             STATUS              PORTS                                              NAMES
b568de3fe931        dev-peer1.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0   "chaincode -peer.a..."   4 minutes ago       Up 4 minutes                                                           dev-peer1.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0
17c1c82087e7        dev-peer0.org1.example.com-mycc-1.0   "chaincode -peer.a..."   4 minutes ago       Up 4 minutes                                                           dev-peer0.org1.example.com-mycc-1.0
0e1c5034c47b        dev-peer0.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0   "chaincode -peer.a..."   4 minutes ago       Up 4 minutes                                                           dev-peer0.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0
71339e7e1d38        hyperledger/fabric-peer               "peer node start -..."   5 minutes ago       Up 5 minutes        0.0.0.0:8051->7051/tcp, 0.0.0.0:8053->7053/tcp     peer1.org1.example.com
add6113ffdcf        hyperledger/fabric-peer               "peer node start -..."   5 minutes ago       Up 5 minutes        0.0.0.0:10051->7051/tcp, 0.0.0.0:10053->7053/tcp   peer1.org2.example.com
689396c0e520        hyperledger/fabric-peer               "peer node start -..."   5 minutes ago       Up 5 minutes        0.0.0.0:7051->7051/tcp, 0.0.0.0:7053->7053/tcp     peer0.org1.example.com
65424407a653        hyperledger/fabric-orderer            "orderer"                5 minutes ago       Up 5 minutes        0.0.0.0:7050->7050/tcp                             orderer.example.com
ce14853db660        hyperledger/fabric-peer               "peer node start -..."   5 minutes ago       Up 5 minutes        0.0.0.0:9051->7051/tcp, 0.0.0.0:9053->7053/tcp     peer0.org2.example.com

If you set a moderately high TIMEOUT value, then you will see your cli container as well.

What's happening behind the scenes?

  • A script - script.sh - is baked inside the CLI container. The script drives the createChannel command against the supplied channel name and uses the channel.tx file for channel configuration.
  • The output of createChannel is a genesis block - <your_channel_name>.block - which gets stored on the peers' file systems and contains the channel configuration specified from channel.tx.
  • The joinChannel command is exercised for all four peers, which takes as input the previously generated genesis block. This command instructs the peers to join <your_channel_name> and create a chain starting with <your_channel_name>.block.
  • Now we have a channel consisting of four peers, and two organizations. This is our TwoOrgsChannel profile.
  • peer0.org1.example.com and peer1.org1.example.com belong to Org1; peer0.org2.example.com and peer1.org2.example.com belong to Org2
  • These relationships are defined through the crypto-config.yaml and the MSP path is specified in our docker compose.
  • The anchor peers for Org1MSP (peer0.org1.example.com) and Org2MSP (peer0.org2.example.com) are then updated. We do this by passing the Org1MSPanchors.tx and Org2MSPanchors.tx artifacts to the ordering service along with the name of our channel.
  • A chaincode - chaincode_example02 - is installed on peer0.org1.example.com and peer0.org2.example.com
  • The chaincode is then "instantiated" on peer0.org2.example.com. Instantiation adds the chaincode to the channel, starts the container for the target peer, and initializes the key value pairs associated with the chaincode. The initial values for this example are ["a","100" "b","200"]. This "instantiation" results in a container by the name of dev-peer0.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0 starting.
  • The instantiation also passes in an argument for the endorsement policy. The policy is defined as -P "OR ('Org1MSP.member','Org2MSP.member')", meaning that any transaction must be endorsed by a peer tied to Org1 or Org2.
  • A query against the value of "a" is issued to peer0.org1.example.com. The chaincode was previously installed on peer0.org1.example.com, so this will start a container for Org1 peer0 by the name of dev-peer0.org1.example.com-mycc-1.0. The result of the query is also returned. No write operations have occurred, so a query against "a" will still return a value of "100".
  • An invoke is sent to peer0.org1.example.com to move "10" from "a" to "b"
  • The chaincode is then installed on peer1.org2.example.com
  • A query is sent to peer1.org2.example.com for the value of "a". This starts a third chaincode container by the name of dev-peer1.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0. A value of 90 is returned, correctly reflecting the previous transaction during which the value for key "a" was modified by 10.

What does this demonstrate?

Chaincode MUST be installed on a peer in order for it to successfully perform read/write operations against the ledger. Furthermore, a chaincode container is not started for a peer until an init or traditional transaction - read/write - is performed against that chaincode (e.g. query for the value of "a"). The transaction causes the container to start. Also, all peers in a channel maintain an exact copy of the ledger which comprises the blockchain to store the immutable, sequenced record in blocks, as well as a state database to maintain current fabric state. This includes those peers that do not have chaincode installed on them (like peer1.org1.example.com in the above example) . Finally, the chaincode is accessible after it is installed (like peer1.org2.example.com in the above example) because it has already been instantiated.

How do I see these transactions?

Check the logs for the CLI docker container.

docker logs -f cli

You should see the following output:

2017-05-16 17:08:01.366 UTC [msp] GetLocalMSP -> DEBU 004 Returning existing local MSP
2017-05-16 17:08:01.366 UTC [msp] GetDefaultSigningIdentity -> DEBU 005 Obtaining default signing identity
2017-05-16 17:08:01.366 UTC [msp/identity] Sign -> DEBU 006 Sign: plaintext: 0AB1070A6708031A0C08F1E3ECC80510...6D7963631A0A0A0571756572790A0161
2017-05-16 17:08:01.367 UTC [msp/identity] Sign -> DEBU 007 Sign: digest: E61DB37F4E8B0D32C9FE10E3936BA9B8CD278FAA1F3320B08712164248285C54
Query Result: 90
2017-05-16 17:08:15.158 UTC [main] main -> INFO 008 Exiting.....
===================== Query on PEER3 on channel 'mychannel' is successful =====================

===================== All GOOD, End-2-End execution completed =====================


 _____   _   _   ____            _____   ____    _____
| ____| | \ | | |  _ \          | ____| |___ \  | ____|
|  _|   |  \| | | | | |  _____  |  _|     __) | |  _|
| |___  | |\  | | |_| | |_____| | |___   / __/  | |___
|_____| |_| \_| |____/          |_____| |_____| |_____|

How can I see the chaincode logs?

Inspect the individual chaincode containers to see the separate transactions executed against each container. Here is the combined output from each container:

$ docker logs dev-peer0.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0
04:30:45.947 [BCCSP_FACTORY] DEBU : Initialize BCCSP [SW]
ex02 Init
Aval = 100, Bval = 200

$ docker logs dev-peer0.org1.example.com-mycc-1.0
04:31:10.569 [BCCSP_FACTORY] DEBU : Initialize BCCSP [SW]
ex02 Invoke
Query Response:{"Name":"a","Amount":"100"}
ex02 Invoke
Aval = 90, Bval = 210

$ docker logs dev-peer1.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0
04:31:30.420 [BCCSP_FACTORY] DEBU : Initialize BCCSP [SW]
ex02 Invoke
Query Response:{"Name":"a","Amount":"90"}

All in one

You can also generate the artifacts and crypto, and drive the tests using a single shell script. The cryptogen, configtxgen and docker-compose commands are embedded in the script. If you choose not to supply a channel ID, then the script will use a default name of mychannel. The cli timeout parameter is an optional value; if you choose not to set it, then your cli container will exit upon conclusion of the script.

./network_setup.sh up

OR

./network_setup.sh up <channel-ID> <timeout-value>

Understanding the docker-compose topology

The e2e_cli folder offers us two flavors of docker-compose files, both of which are extended from the docker-compose-base.yaml. Our first flavor, docker-compose-cli.yaml, provides us with a CLI container, along with an orderer, four peers, and the optional couchDB containers. We use this docker-compose for the entirety of the instructions on this page.

The second flavor, docker-compose-e2e.yaml, is constructed to run end-to-end tests using the Node.js SDK. Aside from functioning with the SDK, its primary differentiation is that there are containers for the fabric-ca servers. As a result, we are able to send REST calls to the organizational CAs for user registration and enrollment.

If you want to use the docker-compose-e2e.yaml without first running the All in one script, then we will need to make four slight modifications. We need to point to the private keys for our Organization's CA's. You can locate these values in your crypto-config folder. For example, to locate the private key for Org1 we would follow this path - crypto-config/peerOrganizations/org1.example.com/ca/. The private key is a long hash value followed by _sk. The path for Org2 would be - crypto-config/peerOrganizations/org2.example.com/ca/.

In the docker-compose-e2e.yaml update the FABRIC_CA_SERVER_TLS_KEYFILE variable for ca0 and ca1. You also need to edit the path that is provided in the command to start the ca server. You are providing the same private key twice for each CA container.

Manually exercise the commands

Exit the currently-running containers:

docker rm -f $(docker ps -aq)

Execute a docker images command in your terminal to view the chaincode images. They will look similar to the following:

REPOSITORY                            TAG                              IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
dev-peer1.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0   latest                           4bc5e9b5dd97        5 seconds ago       176 MB
dev-peer0.org1.example.com-mycc-1.0   latest                           6f2aeb032076        22 seconds ago      176 MB
dev-peer0.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0   latest                           509b8e393cc6        39 seconds ago      176 MB

Remove these images:

docker rmi <IMAGE ID> <IMAGE ID> <IMAGE ID>

For example:

docker rmi -f 4bc 6f2 509

Ensure you have the configuration artifacts. If you deleted them, run the shell script again:

# remember to supply a channel ID
./generateArtifacts.sh <channel-ID>

Modify the docker-compose file

Open the docker-compose-cli.yaml file and comment out the command to run script.sh. Navigate down to the cli container and place a # to the left of the command. For example:

  working_dir: /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer
# command: /bin/bash -c './scripts/script.sh ${CHANNEL_NAME}; sleep $TIMEOUT'

Save the file and return to the /e2e_cli directory.

Now restart your network:

# make sure you are in the /e2e_cli directory where your docker-compose script resides
CHANNEL_NAME=<channel-id> TIMEOUT=<pick_a_value> docker-compose -f docker-compose-cli.yaml up -d

If you want to see the realtime logs for your network, then do not supply the -d flag. If you let the logs stream, then you will need to open a second terminal to execute the CLI calls.

Command syntax

Refer to the create and join commands in the script.sh for the exact syntax.

For the following CLI commands against peer0.org1.example.com to work, we need to preface our commands with the four environment variables given below. These variables for peer0.org1.example.com are baked into the CLI container, therefore we can operate without passing them. HOWEVER, if you want to send calls to other peers or the orderer, then you will need to provide these values accordingly. Inspect the docker-compose-base.yaml for the specific paths:

# Environment variables for PEER0

CORE_PEER_MSPCONFIGPATH=/opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/peerOrganizations/org1.example.com/users/Admin@org1.example.com/msp
CORE_PEER_ADDRESS=peer0.org1.example.com:7051
CORE_PEER_LOCALMSPID="Org1MSP"
CORE_PEER_TLS_ROOTCERT_FILE=/opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/peerOrganizations/org1.example.com/peers/peer0.org1.example.com/tls/ca.crt

Create channel

Exec into the cli container:

docker exec -it cli bash

If successful you should see the following:

root@0d78bb69300d:/opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer#

Specify your channel name with the -c flag. Specify your channel configuration transaction with the -f flag. In this case it is channel.tx, however you can mount your own configuration transaction with a different name.

# the channel.tx file is mounted in the channel-artifacts directory within your cli container
# as a result, we pass the full path for the file
# we also pass the path for the orderer ca-cert in order to verify the TLS handshake
# be sure to replace the $CHANNEL_NAME variable appropriately

peer channel create -o orderer.example.com:7050 -c $CHANNEL_NAME -f ./channel-artifacts/channel.tx --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem

Note

You will remain in the CLI container for the remainder of these manual commands. You must also remember to preface all commands with the corresponding environment variables when targeting a peer other than peer0.org1.example.com.

Join channel

Join specific peers to the channel

# By default, this joins ``peer0.org1.example.com`` only
# the channel.block was returned by the previous command

 peer channel join -b <YOUR_CHANNEL.block>

You can make other peers join the channel as necessary by making appropriate changes in the four environment variables.

Install chaincode onto a remote peer

Install the sample go code onto one of the four peer nodes

peer chaincode install -n mycc -v 1.0 -p github.com/hyperledger/fabric/examples/chaincode/go/example02/cmd

Instantiate chaincode and define the endorsement policy

Instantiate the chaincode on a peer. This will launch a chaincode container for the targeted peer and set the endorsement policy for the chaincode. In this snippet, we define the policy as requiring an endorsement from one peer node that is a part of either Org1 or Org2. The command is:

# be sure to replace the $CHANNEL_NAME environment variable
# if you did not install your chaincode with a name of mycc, then modify that argument as well

peer chaincode instantiate -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n mycc -v 1.0 -c '{"Args":["init","a", "100", "b","200"]}' -P "OR ('Org1MSP.member','Org2MSP.member')"

See the endorsement policies documentation for more details on policy implementation.

Invoke chaincode

# be sure to set the -C and -n flags appropriately
peer chaincode invoke -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem  -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n mycc -c '{"Args":["invoke","a","b","10"]}'

Make sure to wait a few seconds for the operation to complete.

Query chaincode

# be sure to set the -C and -n flags appropriately
peer chaincode query -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n mycc -c '{"Args":["query","a"]}'

The result of the above command should be the following:

Query Result: 90

Feel free to start over and manipulate the key value pairs and subsequent invocations.

Using CouchDB

The state database can be switched from the default (goleveldb) to CouchDB. The same chaincode functions are available with CouchDB, however, there is the added ability to perform rich and complex queries against the state database data content contingent upon the chaincode data being modeled as JSON.

To use CouchDB instead of the default database (goleveldb), follow the same procedure in the Manually exercise the commands section, except when starting the network pass the couchdb docker-compose as well:

# make sure you are in the /e2e_cli directory where your docker-compose script resides
CHANNEL_NAME=<channel-id> TIMEOUT=<pick_a_value> docker-compose -f docker-compose-cli.yaml -f docker-compose-couch.yaml up -d

chaincode_example02 should now work using CouchDB underneath.

Note

If you choose to implement mapping of the fabric-couchdb container port to a host port, please make sure you are aware of the security implications. Mapping of the port in a development environment makes the CouchDB REST API available, and allows the visualization of the database via the CouchDB web interface (Fauxton). Production environments would likely refrain from implementing port mapping in order to restrict outside access to the CouchDB containers.

You can use chaincode_example02 chaincode against the CouchDB state database using the steps outlined above, however in order to exercise the CouchDB query capabilities you will need to use a chaincode that has data modeled as JSON, (e.g. marbles02). You can locate the marbles02 chaincode in the fabric/examples/chaincode/go directory.

We will follow the same process to create and join the channel as outlined in the Manually exercise the commands section above. Once you have joined your peer(s) to the channel, use the following steps to interact with the marbles02 chaincode:

  • Install and instantiate the chaincode on peer0.org1.example.com:
# be sure to modify the $CHANNEL_NAME variable accordingly for the instantiate command

peer chaincode install -o orderer.example.com:7050 -n marbles -v 1.0 -p github.com/hyperledger/fabric/examples/chaincode/go/marbles02
peer chaincode instantiate -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -v 1.0 -c '{"Args":["init"]}' -P "OR ('Org0MSP.member','Org1MSP.member')"
  • Create some marbles and move them around:
# be sure to modify the $CHANNEL_NAME variable accordingly

peer chaincode invoke -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["initMarble","marble1","blue","35","tom"]}'
peer chaincode invoke -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["initMarble","marble2","red","50","tom"]}'
peer chaincode invoke -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["initMarble","marble3","blue","70","tom"]}'
peer chaincode invoke -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["transferMarble","marble2","jerry"]}'
peer chaincode invoke -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["transferMarblesBasedOnColor","blue","jerry"]}'
peer chaincode invoke -o orderer.example.com:7050 --tls --cafile /opt/gopath/src/github.com/hyperledger/fabric/peer/crypto/ordererOrganizations/example.com/orderers/orderer.example.com/msp/cacerts/ca.example.com-cert.pem -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["delete","marble1"]}'
  • If you chose to map the CouchDB ports in docker-compose, you can now view the state database through the CouchDB web interface (Fauxton) by opening a browser and navigating to the following URL:

    http://localhost:5984/_utils

You should see a database named mychannel (or your unique channel name) and the documents inside it.

Note

For the below commands, be sure to update the $CHANNEL_NAME variable appropriately.

You can run regular queries from the CLI (e.g. reading marble2):

peer chaincode query -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["readMarble","marble2"]}'

The output should display the details of marble2:

Query Result: {"color":"red","docType":"marble","name":"marble2","owner":"jerry","size":50}

You can retrieve the history of a specific marble - e.g. marble1:

peer chaincode query -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["getHistoryForMarble","marble1"]}'

The output should display the transactions on marble1:

Query Result: [{"TxId":"1c3d3caf124c89f91a4c0f353723ac736c58155325f02890adebaa15e16e6464", "Value":{"docType":"marble","name":"marble1","color":"blue","size":35,"owner":"tom"}},{"TxId":"755d55c281889eaeebf405586f9e25d71d36eb3d35420af833a20a2f53a3eefd", "Value":{"docType":"marble","name":"marble1","color":"blue","size":35,"owner":"jerry"}},{"TxId":"819451032d813dde6247f85e56a89262555e04f14788ee33e28b232eef36d98f", "Value":}]

You can also perform rich queries on the data content, such as querying marble fields by owner jerry:

peer chaincode query -C $CHANNEL_NAME -n marbles -c '{"Args":["queryMarblesByOwner","jerry"]}'

The output should display the two marbles owned by jerry:

Query Result: [{"Key":"marble2", "Record":{"color":"red","docType":"marble","name":"marble2","owner":"jerry","size":50}},{"Key":"marble3", "Record":{"color":"blue","docType":"marble","name":"marble3","owner":"jerry","size":70}}]

A Note on Data Persistence

If data persistence is desired on the peer container or the CouchDB container, one option is to mount a directory in the docker-host into a relevant directory in the container. For example, you may add the following two lines in the peer container specification in the docker-compose-base.yaml file:

volumes:
 - /var/hyperledger/peer0:/var/hyperledger/production

For the CouchDB container, you may add the following two lines in the CouchDB container specification:

volumes:
 - /var/hyperledger/couchdb0:/opt/couchdb/data

Troubleshooting

  • It's recommended to start your network fresh. Use the following command to remove artifacts, crypto, containers and chaincode images:
./network_setup.sh down
  • If you see docker errors, first check your version (should be 1.12 or above), and then try restarting your docker process. Problems with Docker are oftentimes not immediately recognizable. For example, you may see errors resulting from an inability to access crypto material mounted within a container.
  • If they persist remove your images and start from scratch:
make clean
make docker
  • If you see the below error:
Error: Error endorsing chaincode: rpc error: code = 2 desc = Error installing chaincode code mycc:1.0(chaincode /var/hyperledger/production/chaincodes/mycc.1.0 exits)

You likely have chaincode images (e.g. dev-peer1.org2.example.com-mycc-1.0 or dev-peer0.org1.example.com-mycc-1.0) from prior runs. Remove them and try again.

docker rmi -f $(docker images | grep peer[0-9]-peer[0-9] | awk '{print $3}')
  • If you see something similar to the following:
Error connecting: rpc error: code = 14 desc = grpc: RPC failed fast due to transport failure
Error: rpc error: code = 14 desc = grpc: RPC failed fast due to transport failure

Make sure you pointed to the correct binaries in the release folder when generating the artifacts, and that your backend is running against "beta" images or compiled images from the current master branch.

If you see the below error:

[configtx/tool/localconfig] Load -> CRIT 002 Error reading configuration: Unsupported Config Type ""
panic: Error reading configuration: Unsupported Config Type ""

Then you did not set the FABRIC_CFG_PATH environment variable properly. The configtxgen tool needs this variable in order to locate the configtx.yaml. Go back and recreate your channel artifacts.

  • To cleanup the network, use the down option:
./network_setup.sh down