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Changed eLisp to Elisp everywhere

I heard ya, I heard ya, you think my cAmeLCase was awfy, so I changed it, hopes that makes ya happy, ya swines, ye.
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1 parent 55e1e66 commit 1a43c873a4ff9023557e6f164b94869acf1470c0 @hypernumbers committed Feb 26, 2011
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@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
INTRODUCTION
------------
-This is the source code for the book *Learn eLisp The Hard Way*
+This is the source code for the book *Learn Elisp The Hard Way*
TO BUILD
--------
@@ -10,4 +10,4 @@ To build the book from sources you need to install Sphinx 0.6.6.
This is a package install on Ubuntu 10.10
-You also need to install the package texlive-base if you intend to build the PDF version of the book.
+You also need to install the package texlive-base if you intend to build the PDF version of the book.
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@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
#
-# Learn eLisp For Emacs build configuration file, created by
+# Learn ELisp For Emacs build configuration file, created by
# sphinx-quickstart on Sat Nov 6 22:31:37 2010.
#
# This file is execfile()d with the current directory set to its containing dir.
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@
master_doc = 'index'
# General information about the project.
-project = u'Learn eLisp For Emacs (Draft In Progress)'
+project = u'Learn Elisp For Emacs (Draft In Progress)'
copyright = u'2010, Gordon Guthrie'
# The version info for the project you're documenting, acts as replacement for
@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@
# The name for this set of Sphinx documents. If None, it defaults to
# "<project> v<release> documentation".
-html_title = 'Learn eLisp For Emacs (Draft In Progress)'
+html_title = 'Learn Elisp For Emacs (Draft In Progress)'
# A shorter title for the navigation bar. Default is the same as html_title.
#html_short_title = None
@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@
#html_file_suffix = ''
# Output file base name for HTML help builder.
-htmlhelp_basename = 'Learn-eLisp-For-Emacsdoc'
+htmlhelp_basename = 'Learn-Elisp-For-Emacsdoc'
# -- Options for LaTeX output --------------------------------------------------
@@ -191,7 +191,7 @@
# Grouping the document tree into LaTeX files. List of tuples
# (source start file, target name, title, author, documentclass [howto/manual]).
latex_documents = [
- ('index', 'Learn-eLisp-For-Emacs.tex', u'Learn eLisp For Emacs',
+ ('index', 'Learn-Elisp-For-Emacs.tex', u'Learn Elisp For Emacs',
u'Gordon Guthrie', 'manual'),
]
@@ -1,20 +1,20 @@
======================================
-Best Practice 1 - Writing Better eLisp
+Best Practice 1 - Writing Better Elisp
======================================
------------
Introduction
------------
-So far we have knocked up quick'n'dirty eLisp. As we get deeper into writing eLisp it is important to start following best practices to try and make sure our code is clean, good and easy to maintain.
+So far we have knocked up quick'n'dirty Elisp. As we get deeper into writing Elisp it is important to start following best practices to try and make sure our code is clean, good and easy to maintain.
Best practices will be introduced in small chapters like this.
------------------------------
Avoiding Name Space Collisions
------------------------------
-Emacs (and the eLisp it is written in) uses a lot of global state to manage itself. One of the problems with global state is that it can lead to developers accidentally overwriting other peoples function definitions and variables through name space collisions.
+Emacs (and the Elisp it is written in) uses a lot of global state to manage itself. One of the problems with global state is that it can lead to developers accidentally overwriting other peoples function definitions and variables through name space collisions.
When writing custom code for Emacs you should choose a name that describes what you are doing and use that as a prefix on all your variable and function definitions.
@@ -41,8 +41,8 @@ We will follow these conventions.
Additional Reading
------------------
-There are more `Coding Conventions`_ for writing eLisp additional and rules about `Key-Binding Conventions`_ in the *Emacs Lisp Reference Manual*.
+There are more `Coding Conventions`_ for writing Elisp additional and rules about `Key-Binding Conventions`_ in the *Emacs Lisp Reference Manual*.
-.. _Coding Conventions: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/elisp/html_node/Coding-Conventions.html#Coding-Conventions
+.. _Coding Conventions: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/Elisp/html_node/Coding-Conventions.html#Coding-Conventions
-.. _Key-Binding Conventions: http://www.gnu.org/s/emacs/manual/html_node/elisp/Key-Binding-Conventions.html#Key-Binding-Conventions
+.. _Key-Binding Conventions: http://www.gnu.org/s/emacs/manual/html_node/Elisp/Key-Binding-Conventions.html#Key-Binding-Conventions
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ A dialog box entitled `Applying Changes` will appear. When the changes have been
How This Book Will Work
-----------------------
-The work on learning eLisp will take place within an X-Windows enabled version of Emacs as shown below.
+The work on learning Elisp will take place within an X-Windows enabled version of Emacs as shown below.
.. image :: /images/emacs.png
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
==============
-Learning eLisp
+Learning Elisp
==============
--------------------
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ This book is for people who can already programme, but who are not familiar with
It assumes that the reader can get a clean install of Ubuntu GNU/Linux up and running.
---------------------------
-How This Book Teaches eLisp
+How This Book Teaches Elisp
---------------------------
-This book teaches eLisp through the medium of Emacs. Emacs has a *scratch* window in which arbitrary eLisp expressions can be evaluated. Initial lessons will use the *scratch* window. Later lessons will move on to creating external lisp files and loading them into Emacs to use them.
+This book teaches Elisp through the medium of Emacs. Emacs has a *scratch* window in which arbitrary Elisp expressions can be evaluated. Initial lessons will use the *scratch* window. Later lessons will move on to creating external lisp files and loading them into Emacs to use them.
@@ -1,12 +1,12 @@
==================================
-Lesson 2-1 - First eLisp Programme
+Lesson 2-1 - First Elisp Programme
==================================
-----------------
Let's Get Started
-----------------
-This lesson will show you how to execute your first eLisp programme.
+This lesson will show you how to execute your first Elisp programme.
* start Emacs
* go to the scratch buffer by using the menu `Buffers -> \*scratch\*`
@@ -19,11 +19,11 @@ Then put the cursor at the **end** of the expression - that is to say after the
What you typed in consists of an expression ``(+ 1 2)`` and a command to Emacs to execute it ``[Control-j]``. Expressions are sometimes called *forms*.
-eLisp is a dialect of Lisp - which stands for List Processing. A list is any thing between two brackets ``(`` and ``)``
+Elisp is a dialect of Lisp - which stands for List Processing. A list is any thing between two brackets ``(`` and ``)``
The programme that was executed consisted of an operator ``+`` and two constants ``1`` and ``2``
-The command ``Control-j`` in Emacs is applied at the point where the cursor is - it evaluates all the eLisp in the window up to that point and prints the output.
+The command ``Control-j`` in Emacs is applied at the point where the cursor is - it evaluates all the Elisp in the window up to that point and prints the output.
Let's look at executing the same expression in a different way. Delete the expression in the \*scratch\* buffer and type in a new one.
@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ You can express floating point numbers in scientific notation.
What You Have Learned
---------------------
-You have learned how to evaluate a basic eLisp expression (or form) in the scratch buffer.
+You have learned how to evaluate a basic Elisp expression (or form) in the scratch buffer.
**In future lessons you will not be told how to evaluate an expression - be sure to remember the key sequences to do it.**
@@ -91,4 +91,4 @@ What do you think these symbols represent?
| ``-1.0e+INF``
| ``0.0e+NaN`` or ``-0.0e+NaN``
-.. _GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/elisp/Numbers.html#Numbers
+.. _GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/Elisp/Numbers.html#Numbers
@@ -2,22 +2,22 @@
Lesson 2-2 - Primitive Data Types (1)
=====================================
-**Prerequisite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke eLisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
+**Prerequisite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke Elisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
-------
Context
-------
The previous lessons looked at performing basic arithmetic operations on various sorts of numbers.
-This lessons will look at the other sorts of data types in eLisp. There are two different sorts of data types:
+This lessons will look at the other sorts of data types in Elisp. There are two different sorts of data types:
* primitive data types
* non-primitive data types
The difference between them is that non-primitive data types can be assembled from primitive ones.
-The general set of primitive data types of eLisp are:
+The general set of primitive data types of Elisp are:
* integer
* float
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ The general set of primitive data types of eLisp are:
These primitive data types largely correspond to the primitive data types of other Lisps.
-In addition eLisp has a number of data types that are peculiar to it, because they pertain to the fact that eLisp is the scripting language of an editor. These data types are:
+In addition Elisp has a number of data types that are peculiar to it, because they pertain to the fact that Elisp is the scripting language of an editor. These data types are:
* buffer
* marker
@@ -166,7 +166,7 @@ The first line of this give us some details of the problem, it is a Lisp error -
Converting Between Data Types
-----------------------------
-Sometimes eLisp converts between data types. Consider mixed arithmetic with integers and floating point numbers:
+Sometimes Elisp converts between data types. Consider mixed arithmetic with integers and floating point numbers:
:You Type: ``(+ 1 2.5)``
:Result: ``3.5``
@@ -220,4 +220,4 @@ What do the following functions do:
* ``ceiling``
* ``floor``
-.. _GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/elisp/Lisp-Data-Types.html#Lisp-Data-Types
+.. _GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/Elisp/Lisp-Data-Types.html#Lisp-Data-Types
@@ -2,21 +2,21 @@
Lesson 2-3 - Lists (At Last)
============================
-**Prerequesite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke eLisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
+**Prerequesite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke Elisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
------------
Introduction
------------
-eLisp is a dialect of Lisp - the LISt Processing language.
+Elisp is a dialect of Lisp - the LISt Processing language.
You will have noticed that all the expressions we have used so far have been of the form ``(something somethingelse anotherthing)``. That basic form is a list - defined by the opening and closing brackets. All the expressions we have looked at so far have been the simplest sort of programmes - lists where the first element is an operator and the remaining elements are data. But a list can also be simple data.
----------
Data Lists
----------
-The eLisp interpreter has to be told that it is a data list. This is done by **quoting** it with a single quote.
+The Elisp interpreter has to be told that it is a data list. This is done by **quoting** it with a single quote.
:You Type: ``'(1 2 3)``
:Result: ``(1 2 3)``
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
Lesson 2-4 - Symbols And Variables
==================================
-**Prerequisite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke eLisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
+**Prerequisite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke Elisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
----------------
Symbols Overview
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ Symbols can be the name of functions (or operators). We will look into how these
Symbols As Variables
--------------------
-Instances of Data Types evaluate to themselves in eLisp:
+Instances of Data Types evaluate to themselves in Elisp:
:You Type: ``9``
:Result: ``9``
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ You can evaluate Symbols similarly
:You Type: ``fill-column``
:Result: ``70``
-(It might not be ``70`` - but it probably will be). ``fill-column`` is a variable in eLisp with global scope. Later on we will see how this sort of variable will be used and have its value changed.
+(It might not be ``70`` - but it probably will be). ``fill-column`` is a variable in Elisp with global scope. Later on we will see how this sort of variable will be used and have its value changed.
Variables don't just exist with default values. If you try and use a random symbol in an expression it will fail.
@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ If we now evaluate the ``do_tell`` it no longer throws an error:
:You Type: ``do_tell``
:Result: ``11``
-Notice that when the value of ``do_tell`` was set ``do_tell`` was quoted viz ``'do_tell``. The quoting says to eLisp "*don't treat do_tell as a variable is a value to be passed to the operator set*". The operator ``setq`` just *absorbs* that quote and lets you not quote the first parameter.
+Notice that when the value of ``do_tell`` was set ``do_tell`` was quoted viz ``'do_tell``. The quoting says to Elisp "*don't treat do_tell as a variable is a value to be passed to the operator set*". The operator ``setq`` just *absorbs* that quote and lets you not quote the first parameter.
:You Type: ``(setq do_tell '22)``
:Return: ``22``
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ You have learned how to set values of Symbols and then reuse those symbols in ex
Additional Reading
------------------
-Symbols in eLisp are a bit more complex than symbols in other languages - there is a discussion of `Symbols`_ in the *Introduction To Emacs Lisp* manual.
+Symbols in Elisp are a bit more complex than symbols in other languages - there is a discussion of `Symbols`_ in the *Introduction To Emacs Lisp* manual.
You can read about `Symbol Properties`_ in the *Emacs Lisp Reference* manual.
@@ -168,6 +168,6 @@ However if we now evaluate the value of ``hotdog`` you will see that it is ``(:q
What happens if you try and set the property list of an undefined symbol?
-.. _Symbols: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/elisp/Symbol-Components.html#Symbol-Components
+.. _Symbols: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/Elisp/Symbol-Components.html#Symbol-Components
-.. _Symbol Properties: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/elisp/html_node/Symbol-Plists.html#Symbol-Plists
+.. _Symbol Properties: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/Elisp/html_node/Symbol-Plists.html#Symbol-Plists
@@ -2,15 +2,15 @@
Lesson 2-5 - Arrays (And Sequences)
===================================
-**Prerequesite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke eLisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
+**Prerequesite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke Elisp expression as shown in Lesson 2-1.
------------
Introduction
------------
-We have seen *lists* in eLisp. Lists are an example of a *sequence* - a load of things stored in another thing which we can access sequentially.
+We have seen *lists* in Elisp. Lists are an example of a *sequence* - a load of things stored in another thing which we can access sequentially.
-There is another type of *sequence* in eLisp - an *array*. Arrays themselves come in 2 flavours:
+There is another type of *sequence* in Elisp - an *array*. Arrays themselves come in 2 flavours:
* strings
* vectors
@@ -40,13 +40,13 @@ The difference between arrays and lists is that arrays have fixed lengths and li
Difference Between Strings And Vectors
--------------------------------------
-In eLisp a string is simply an array whose elements consists of the integers which represent unicode points. A vector is a general array whose elements are any valid eLisp term.
+In Elisp a string is simply an array whose elements consists of the integers which represent unicode points. A vector is a general array whose elements are any valid Elisp term.
-------------------
Why Only 1D Arrays?
-------------------
-Arrays are 1 dimensional only. Given that the elements of a vector can consist of other valid eLisp symbol, multi-dimensional arrays can be implemented as vectors of vectors.
+Arrays are 1 dimensional only. Given that the elements of a vector can consist of other valid Elisp symbol, multi-dimensional arrays can be implemented as vectors of vectors.
---------------
Creating Arrays
@@ -3,16 +3,16 @@ Lesson 3-1 - Writing Functions
==============================
-----------------
-Script Mode eLisp
+Script Mode Elisp
-----------------
-In order to write functions it is necessary to change the way in which eLisp expressions will be evaluated. Instead of invoking expressions in the \*scratch\* buffer it is time to switch to running eLisp as a script.
+In order to write functions it is necessary to change the way in which Elisp expressions will be evaluated. Instead of invoking expressions in the \*scratch\* buffer it is time to switch to running Elisp as a script.
-To do this an eLisp file has to be invoked from the command line. If you had some eLisp expressions in a file called *first_programme.el* the following command would be run it as a script ``emacs --no-site-file --script first_programme.el``
+To do this an Elisp file has to be invoked from the command line. If you had some Elisp expressions in a file called *first_programme.el* the following command would be run it as a script ``emacs --no-site-file --script first_programme.el``
-The option ``--no-site-file`` means that emacs doesn't load any eLisp from the site libraries. By default the ``--script`` option also includes option ``--no-init-file``. Normally emacs starts and executes a init file. In Ubuntu this file is ``.emacs`` in the users home directory.
+The option ``--no-site-file`` means that emacs doesn't load any Elisp from the site libraries. By default the ``--script`` option also includes option ``--no-init-file``. Normally emacs starts and executes a init file. In Ubuntu this file is ``.emacs`` in the users home directory.
-Start by creating a new directory, and in that create a file called *message.el*. The contents of that file is a single eLisp expression:
+Start by creating a new directory, and in that create a file called *message.el*. The contents of that file is a single Elisp expression:
::
@@ -130,13 +130,13 @@ The important part of this is the first part of the function definition ``(defun
What You Have Learned
---------------------
-You have learned how to run eLisp programmes in batch mode, and also how to define simple, more complex and variable arity functions and invoke them.
+You have learned how to run Elisp programmes in batch mode, and also how to define simple, more complex and variable arity functions and invoke them.
------------------
Additional Reading
------------------
-There is a section of the eLisp Reference Manual entitled `Functions`_.
+There is a section of the Elisp Reference Manual entitled `Functions`_.
----------------
Extra Activities
@@ -147,5 +147,5 @@ Write a function with multiple line documentation.
The *required*, *optional* and *rest* clauses must be specified in that order. Can you work out why?
-.. _Functions: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/elisp/html_node/Functions.html#Functions
+.. _Functions: http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/Elisp/html_node/Functions.html#Functions
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
Lesson 3-2 - More Functions
===========================
-**Prerequisite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke eLisp expression as scripts as shown in Lesson 3-1.
+**Prerequisite:** This lesson presumes you know how to invoke Elisp expression as scripts as shown in Lesson 3-1.
------------
Introduction
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