Permalink
Browse files

Let's to style

After Rafe Kettler's commit I checked the Shorter Oxford Dictionary to get a style for Lets/Let's - and it is with an apostrophe.

Turns out I use Let's quite a lot :(
  • Loading branch information...
hypernumbers committed Feb 22, 2011
1 parent 5b6b7ae commit 91a958d62793532c9062f2fe812fcb876f6cbda6
@@ -6,15 +6,15 @@ Emacs And The .emacs File
Introduction
------------
-We will be using the `.emacs` file a lot to get our functionality into Emacs. Emacs itself also uses the `.emacs` file. Lets see how it uses it.
+We will be using the `.emacs` file a lot to get our functionality into Emacs. Emacs itself also uses the `.emacs` file. Let's see how it uses it.
--------------
Saving Options
--------------
-Emacs saves some of your options in the `.emacs` file. Lets change some options, save them and then see how they appear.
+Emacs saves some of your options in the `.emacs` file. Let's change some options, save them and then see how they appear.
-Lets start by clearing the `.emacs` file - open it in an editor, delete all the contents and save it. (You might want to copy it elsewhere if it has stuff in it you really care about).
+Start by clearing the `.emacs` file - open it in an editor, delete all the contents and save it. (You might want to copy it elsewhere if it has stuff in it you really care about).
If you edited it in Emacs you will need to close Emacs and reopen it to 'lose' all your old configuration - if you edited it in an other editor, simply open Emacs.
@@ -2,9 +2,9 @@
Lesson 2-1 - First eLisp Programme
==================================
-----------------
-Lets Get Started
-----------------
+-----------------
+Let's Get Started
+-----------------
This lesson will show you how to execute your first eLisp programme.
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ The programme that was executed consisted of an operator ``+`` and two constants
The command ``Control-j`` in Emacs is applied at the point where the cursor is - it evaluates all the eLisp in the window up to that point and prints the output.
-Lets look at executing the same expression in a different way. Delete the expression in the \*scratch\* buffer and type in a new one.
+Let's look at executing the same expression in a different way. Delete the expression in the \*scratch\* buffer and type in a new one.
:You Type: ``(+ 1.0 2.0)``
@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ Functions With Variable Numbers Of Arguments
We have seen that the function ``defun`` has variable arity - that is to say it can take 3 or 4 arguments - we will see later that it can actually take 5 parameters.
-Lets write a variable arity function:
+Let's write a variable arity function:
::
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Emacs switches into a special mode for a particular programming language by look
The modeline now contains the expression (Emacs-Lisp) which indicates that it is in *the Emacs Lisp Major Mode*. The menu bar now has an *Emacs-Lisp* menu.
-A new menu has appeared. Lets look at some of the commands on it. There are indenting commands that can be used to pretty up the source code and lay it out consistently. (*Indent Line* uses the [Tab] key to indent a line. Regions commands can be used on regions - blocks of code which have been selected by marking their starts with [Control][Space] and the moving the cursor point.
+A new menu has appeared. Let's look at some of the commands on it. There are indenting commands that can be used to pretty up the source code and lay it out consistently. (*Indent Line* uses the [Tab] key to indent a line. Regions commands can be used on regions - blocks of code which have been selected by marking their starts with [Control][Space] and the moving the cursor point.
There are menu commands for evaluating expressions and the contents of the buffer as well as various profiling and tracing tools.
@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ Look carefully at the function definition. The third parameter of the list is th
A Custom Function With User Input
---------------------------------
-Lets edit the function to take some parameters:
+Let's edit the function to take some parameters:
::
@@ -82,7 +82,7 @@ You should see something like this:
.. image :: /images/emacs-using-describe-function.png
-Lets add a proper function definition for our function. Edit `omarmenu.el`:
+Let's add a proper function definition for our function. Edit `omarmenu.el`:
| ``(defun omar-count ()``
| ``(interactive)``
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ Now that we have the function wired in, lets make it do what it says on the tin.
| ``(setq count (1+ count)))``
| ``(message "Buffer has %d words." count)))``
-Lets see what this function does. It starts by defining a local variable `count` using the `let` operator. Note that the brackets which include `let` cover the whole rest of the function. We will look at local and global scope of variables in the next lesson.
+Let's see what this function does. It starts by defining a local variable `count` using the `let` operator. Note that the brackets which include `let` cover the whole rest of the function. We will look at local and global scope of variables in the next lesson.
The next function call is ``(goto-char (point-min))``. We can use `describe-function` to work what that does. Executing *[M]-x* `describe-function` for `goto-char` and it prints the following:
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ The transition from Fortran to the Obect Orientated paradigm of C++ was enormous
I may be wrong, but I think that many experienced programmers who have no previous exposure to functional programming would benefit from a pretty brutal beginners style book about eLisp.
-I have copies of `On Lisp`_ by Paul Graham and `Common Lisp A Gentle Introduction To Symbolic Computing`_ but have never been able to learn Lisp because of the very basic problem that Zed Shaw identified in `his article`_ on *How To Write A LxTHW* - I could never work out how to get to a basic working shell to type the code examples into. It's not that I didn't try, its just that after a summer of trying to start learning Lisp I had gotten nowhere. If you think that that's my fault, then it falls to you to explain how I managed to learn a Brazilian other languages successfully.
+I have copies of `On Lisp`_ by Paul Graham and `Common Lisp A Gentle Introduction To Symbolic Computing`_ but have never been able to learn Lisp because of the very basic problem that Zed Shaw identified in `his article`_ on *How To Write A LxTHW* - I could never work out how to get to a basic working shell to type the code examples into. It's not that I didn't try, its just that after a summer of trying to start learning Lisp I had gotten nowhere. If you think that that's my fault, then it falls to you to explain how I managed to learn a bazillion other languages successfully.
The other appealing part of this format is that it isn't a reference book. To make clear just how unsuited I am to write a reference book about Lisp, let me enumerate ATTIDNK (All The Things I Do Not Know):

0 comments on commit 91a958d

Please sign in to comment.