Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with
or
.
Download ZIP
Translate using i18n and scope it according to the object's place in Ruby's hierarchial structure
Ruby
branch: master

README.rdoc

object_scoped_i18n

Translate using i18n and scope accoring to the object's place in Ruby's hierarchial structure.

To use, extend the class:

class Admin < User
  extend ObjectScopedI18n
end

You can now call translations on the object:

Admin.translate(:name)

Which calls I18n like this:

I18n.translate(:"admin.name", :default => [:"user.name", :"object.name"])

Which looks up “admin.name” first; if it didn't found that, it looks up “user.name”, including any included modules, all way up.

Namespaces are introduced as extra scope.

class SomeModule::SomeClass
end

SomeModule::SomeClass.translate(:name)

Will be the same as:

I18n.translate(:"some_module.some_class.name", :default => {...})

You can off course use all the options you would normally use with I18n.

Why?

Because I wanted something that was like ActiveRecord's human_attribute_name, but consitently over other objects too.

So what about human_attribute_name?

You can override it, so it's use object_scoped_i18n:

class ActiveRecord::Base
  extend ObjectScopedI18n
  def self.human_attribute_name(key, options = {})
    translate(key, {:default => key.to_s.humanize, :scope => [:activerecord, :attributes]}.merge(options))
  end
end

You now change the scope if you like. Also, you'll get global translations for free, for columns like “created_at” and “updated_at”.

Installation

Just gem install object_scoped_i18n and require it in your project, like you're used to.

Copyright

Copyright © 2009 Iain Hecker. Released under the MIT license.

Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.