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README.mkdn

NAME

Data::Object::Autobox - An Autobox Implementation for Perl 5

Build Status

VERSION

version 0.15

SYNOPSIS

use Data::Object::Autobox;

my $input  = [1,1,1,1,3,3,2,1,5,6,7,8,9];
my $output = $input->grep('$a < 5')->unique->sort; # [1,2,3]
my $object = $output->array;

$output->join(',')->print; # 1,2,3
$object->join(',')->print; # 1,2,3

$object->isa('Data::Object::Array');

DESCRIPTION

Data::Object::Autobox implements autoboxing via autobox to provide boxing for native Perl 5 data types. This functionality is provided by Data::Object which provides a collection of object classes for handling SCALAR, ARRAY, HASH, CODE, INTEGER, FLOAT, NUMBER, STRING, UNDEF, and UNIVERSAL data type operations. Data::Object provides its own boxing strategy in that every method call which would normally return a native data type will return a data type object, but this functionality requires an initial data type object. Data::Object::Autobox makes it so that you do not need to explicitly create the initial data type object, and once the initial autobox method call is made, the Data::Object boxing takes over.

FLAVORS

Data::Object::Autobox endeavors to implement autoboxing in various flavors to be suitable in different environments. Currently, there are two boxing flavors available, autoload and composite, both of which implement the boxing architecture but handle dispatching and returning in different ways. The default boxing flavor is composite because that flavor is the closest, in implementation, to what most people are already familiar with. The following example describes how flavors are enacted:

use Data::Object::Autobox -autoload;  # autoboxing via autoload
use Data::Object::Autobox -composite; # autoboxing via composite

The differences between the main boxing flavors is in how they react to input, dispatch, and return data. The autoload flavor uses AUTOLOAD to delegate autoboxing to the Data::Object framework. It is likely that once the initial delegation happens, autoboxing is no longer necessary in the chaining of routines. Additionally, the data returned from autoboxed actions under autoload will always be Data::Object instances.

Conversely, the composite flavor uses role composition, with the respective roles which Data::Object objects are comprised of, to provide type-specific boxing functions only. This implementation uses the typical autoboxing approach, i.e. the autobox pragma handles the boxing, composition provides the functions, and the data returned is not a Data::Object instance.

Additionally, this module supports passing user-defined classes to Data::Object::Autobox. The follow is an example of passing custom user-defined classes which can be completely custom, or inherit from any of the existing implementations.

use Data::Object::Autobox -custom => (
    ARRAY     => "MyApp::Autobox::Array",
    CODE      => "MyApp::Autobox::Code",
    FLOAT     => "MyApp::Autobox::Float",
    HASH      => "MyApp::Autobox::Hash",
    INTEGER   => "MyApp::Autobox::Integer",
    NUMBER    => "MyApp::Autobox::Number",
    SCALAR    => "MyApp::Autobox::Scalar",
    STRING    => "MyApp::Autobox::String",
    UNDEF     => "MyApp::Autobox::Undef",
    UNIVERSAL => "MyApp::Autobox::Universal",
);

Array Methods

Array methods are called on array references, for example, using $array->method(@args), which will act on the $array reference and will return a new data type object. Many array methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Array methods are handled via the Data::Object::Array object class which is provided to the autobox ARRAY option.

Code Methods

Code methods are called on code references, for example, using $code->method(@args), which will act on the $code reference and will return a new data type object. Many code methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Code methods are handled via the Data::Object::Code object class which is provided to the autobox CODE option.

Float Methods

Float methods are called on float values, for example, using $float->method(@args), which will act on the $float value and will return a new data type object. Many float methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Float methods are handled via the Data::Object::Float object class which is provided to the autobox FLOAT option.

Hash Methods

Hash methods are called on hash references, for example, using $hash->method(@args), which will act on the $hash reference and will return a new data type object. Many hash methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Hash methods are handled via the Data::Object::Hash object class which is provided to the autobox HASH option.

Integer Methods

Integer methods are called on integer values, for example, using $integer->method(@args), which will act on the $integer value and will return a new data type object. Many integer methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Integer methods are handled via the Data::Object::Integer object class which is provided to the autobox INTEGER option .

Number Methods

Number methods are called on number values, for example, using $number->method(@args), which will act on the $number value and will return a new data type object. Many number methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Number methods are handled via the Data::Object::Number object class which is provided to the autobox NUMBER option .

Scalar Methods

Scalar methods are called on scalar references and values, for example, using $scalar->method(@args), which will act on the $scalar reference and will return a new data type object. Many scalar methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Scalar methods are handled via the Data::Object::Scalar object class which is provided to the autobox SCALAR option .

String Methods

String methods are called on string values, for example, using $string->method(@args), which will act on the $string value and will return a new data type object. Many string methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. String methods are handled via the Data::Object::String object class which is provided to the autobox STRING option .

Undef Methods

Undef methods are called on undef values, for example, using $undef->method(@args), which will act on the $undef value and will return a new data type object. Many undef methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Undef methods are handled via the Data::Object::Undef object class which is provided to the autobox UNDEF option .

Universal Methods

Universal methods can be called on any values, for example, using $universal->method(@args), which will act on the reference or value and will return a new data type object. Many universal methods are simply wrappers around core functions, but there are additional operations and modifications to core behavior. Universal methods are handled via the Data::Object::Universal object class which is provided to the autobox UNIVERSAL option.

SEE ALSO

AUTHOR

Al Newkirk al@iamalnewkirk.com

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

This software is copyright (c) 2014 by Al Newkirk.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.

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