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Changelog

This document maintains a list of changes to the slate-react package with each new version. Until 1.0.0 is released, breaking changes will be added as minor version bumps, and smaller changes won't be accounted for since the library is moving quickly.


0.21.0 — November 2, 2018

NEW

Introducing the slate-react-placeholder package. This new package is what handles the default placeholder= prop logic for the editor, and it can be used yourself for situations where you want to render browser-like placeholders in custom nodes.

BREAKING

The renderPlacehodler middleware has been removed. Previously this was how you rendered custom placeholders in the editor, but that logic can now be implemented with decorateNode instead, in a way that causes less confusion and overlap in the API. The new slate-react-placeholder package does exactly that, adding a decoration to the editor when it is empty.


0.20.0 — October 27, 2018

BREAKING

Updated to work with slate@0.43. The React bindings have been updated to work with the newest version of Slate which removes the Change object.

The Change object has been removed. The Change object as we know it previously has been removed, and all of its behaviors have been folded into the Editor controller. This includes the top-level commands and queries methods, as well as methods like applyOperation and normalize. All places that used to receive change now receive editor, which is API equivalent.

Changes are now flushed to onChange asynchronously. Previously this was done synchronously, which resulted in some strange race conditions in React environments. Now they will always be flushed asynchronously, just like setState.

The render*, decorate* and shouldNodeComponentUpdate middleware signatures have changed! Previously the render*, decorate* and shouldNodeComponentUpdate middleware was passed (props, next). However now, for consistency with the other middleware they are all passed (props, editor, next). The shouldNodeComponentUpdate is passed (prevProps, props, editor, next). This way, all middleware always receive editor and next as their final two arguments.


0.19.0 — October 9, 2018

NEW

The <Editor> can now choose to not normalize on mount. A nice side effect of splitting out the Editor logic into a reusable place is that it's easier to implement customizable behaviors for normalization. You can now pass an options={{ normalize: false }} prop to the React <Editor> which will disable the default normalization that takes place when the editor is constructed. This is helpful in cases where you are guaranteed to have an already normalized value, and don't want to incur the performance cost of normalizing it again.

The middleware stack is now deferrable. With the introduction of the Editor controller, the middleware stack in Slate has also been upgraded. Each middleware now receives a next function (similar to Express or Koa) that allows you to choose whether to iterating the stack or not.

// Previously, you'd return `undefined` to continue.
function onKeyDown(event, editor, next) {
  if (event.key !== 'Enter') return
  ...
}

// Now, you call `next()` to continue...
function onKeyDown(event, editor, next) {
  if (event.key !== 'Enter') return next()
  ...
}

While that may seem inconvenient, it opens up an entire new behavior, which is deferring to the plugins later in the stack to see if they "handle" a specific case, and if not, handling it yourself:

function onKeyDown(event, editor, next) {
  if (event.key === 'Enter') {
    const handled = next()
    if (handled) return handled

    // Otherwise, handle `Enter` yourself...
  }
}

This is how all of the core logic in slate-react is now implemented, eliminating the need for a "before" and an "after" plugin that duplicate logic.

Under the covers, the schema, commands and queries concept are all implemented as plugins that attach varying middleware as well. For example, commands are processed using the onCommand middleware under the covers:

const plugin = {
  onCommand(command, editor, next) {
    ...
  }
}

This allows you to actually listen in to all commands, and override individual behaviors if you choose to do so, without having to override the command itself. This is a very advanced feature, which most people won't need, but it shows the flexibility provided by migrating all of the previously custom internal logic to be based on the new middleware stack.

BREAKING

Updated to the latest version of slate. The slate-react codebase has been updated to be compatible with the latest version of slate, 0.42.0. This is a backward incompatible upgrade, and so the peer dependency range has been bumped.

The middleware stack must now be explicitly continued, using next. Previously returning undefined from a middleware would (usually) continue the stack onto the next middleware. Now, with middleware taking a next function argument you must explicitly decide to continue the stack by call next() yourself.

The editor object is no longer passed to event handlers. Previously, the third argument to event handlers would be the React editor instance. However, now that Change objects contain a direct reference to the editor, you can access this on change.editor instead.

function onKeyDown(event, editor, next) {
  const { editor } = change
  ...
}

In its place is the new next argument, which allows you to choose to defer to the plugins further on the stack before handling the event yourself.

The findRange, findPoint, cloneFragment, and getEventRange utils now take an editor. Previously these utility functions took a schema argument, but this has been replaced with the new editor controller instead now that the Schema model has been removed.


0.18.0 — August 22, 2018

BREAKING

Remove all previously deprecated code paths. This helps to reduce some of the complexity in Slate by not having to handle these code paths anymore. And it helps to reduce file size. When upgrading, it's highly recommended that you upgrade to the previous version first and ensure there are no deprecation warnings being logged, then upgrade to this version.


0.17.0 — August 22, 2018

NEW

Updated to work with slate@0.39.0 with the new Decoration and Selection. This isn't a breaking change to any of the API's in slate-react, but it does update it to work with the newly introduced models and breaking changed in the newest version of Slate core.


0.16.0 — August 21, 2018

NEW

Updated to work with slate@0.38.0 without node.isVoid. This isn't a breaking change to any of the API's in slate-react itself, but it does update it to no longer log deprecation warnings for node.isVoid property access.


0.15.0 — August 3, 2018

NEW

Updated to work with slate@0.37.0 with points. This isn't a breaking change to any of the API's in slate-react itself, but it does update it to no longer depend on the core API's that were deprecated in 0.37.0.


0.14.0 — July 27, 2018

NEW

Updated to work with the slate@0.35.0 with paths. It now uses the PathUtils export in the latest slate internally to work with paths. This isn't a breaking change, but to use this library with the latest Slate you'll need to upgrade.


0.13.0 — July 3, 2018

BREAKING

The isSelected prop of nodes has changed. Previously it was only true when the node was selected and the editor was focused. Now it is true even when the editor is not focused, and a new isFocused property has been added for the old behavior.


0.12.0 — February 21, 2018

BREAKING

Update to use slate@0.33.0. This is to match the changes to void node behavior where their content is no longer restricted.


0.11.0 — January 4, 2018

BREAKING

The kind property of Slate objects has been renamed to object. This is to reduce the confusion over the difference between "kind" and "type" which are practically synonyms. The "object" name was chosen to match the Stripe API, since it seems like a sensible choice and reads much more nicely when looking through JSON.


0.10.0 — October 27, 2017

BREAKING

Remove all previously deprecated code paths. This helps to reduce some of the complexity in Slate by not having to handle these code paths anymore. And it helps to reduce file size. When upgrading, it's highly recommended that you upgrade to the previous version first and ensure there are no deprecation warnings being logged, then upgrade to this version.


0.9.0 — October 27, 2017

BREAKING

Updated to use slate@0.29.0. This is to gain access to the new Value model introduced in the newest version of Slate.

Custom components no longer receive props.state or props.schema. These are now exposed directly on the props.editor instance itself as editor.value and editor.schema. This helps eliminate a common issue where because of shouldComponentUpdate returning false, the props.state value was actually outdated, and transforming from it would cause incorrect behaviors.

The plugin.renderEditor function's signature has changed. Previously it received (props, state, editor) but it now receives just (props, editor). If you need access to the editor's current value, use the new editor.value property. This is simply to clean up the API, since the value is already accessible on editor.

DEPRECATED

The "state" has been renamed to "value" everywhere. All of the current references are maintained as deprecations, so you should be able to upgrade and see warnings logged instead of being greeted with a broken editor. This is to reduce the confusion between React's "state" and Slate's editor value, and in an effort to further mimic the native DOM APIs.

The editor getSchema(), getStack() and getState() methods are deprecated. These have been replaced by property getters on the editor instance itself—editor.schema, editor.stack and editor.value, respectively. This is to reduce confusion with React's own setState, and to make accessing these commonly used properties more convenient.

NEW

Added a new editor.value getter property. This now mimics the DOM for things like input.value and textarea.value, and is the new way to access the editor's current value.

Added new editor.schema and editor.stack getters. Similarly to the new value getter, these two new getters give you access to the editor's current schema and stack.


0.8.0 — October 25, 2017

BREAKING

The Schema objects in Slate have changed! Previously, they used to be where you could define normalization rules, define rendering rules, and define decoration rules. This was overloaded, and made other improvements hard. Now, rendering and decorating is done via the newly added plugin functions (renderNode, renderMark, decorateNode). And validation is done either via the lower-level validateNode plugin function, or via the new schema objects.

The plugin.onBeforeChange function was removed. Previously there was both an onBeforeChange handler and an onChange handler. Now there is just an onChange handler, and the core plugin adds it's own logic before others.

The plugin.render function was renamed to plugin.renderEditor. It performs the same function, but has been renamed to disambiguate between all of the other new rendering functions available to plugins.

NEW

State objects now have an embedded state.schema property. This new schema property is used to automatically normalize the state as it changes, according to the editor's current schema. This makes normalization much easier.

A new renderNode plugin function was added. This is the new way to render nodes, instead of using the schema. Any plugin can define a renderNode(props) function which is passed the props to render the custom node component with. This is similar to react-router's render={...} prop if you are familiar with that.

A new renderPlaceholder plugin function was added. This is similar to the renderNode helper, except for rendering placeholders.

A new decorateNode plugin function was added. This is similar to the old rule.decorate function from schemas. Any plugin can define a decorateNode(node) function and that can return extra decoration ranges of marks to apply to the document.

A new validateNode plugin function was added. This is the new way to do specific, custom validations. (There's also the new schema, which is the easier way to do most common validations.) Any plugin can define a validateNode(node) function that will be called to ensure nodes are valid. If they are valid, the function should return nothing. Otherwise, it should return a change function that normalizes the node to make it valid again.


0.7.0 — October 18, 2017

BREAKING

The <Placeholder> component no longer exists! Previously there was a Placeholder component exported from slate-react, but it had lots of problems and a confusing API. Instead, placeholder logic can now be defined via the schema by providing a placeholder component to render what a node is matched.


0.6.0 — October 16, 2017

BREAKING

The data argument to event handlers has been removed. Previously event handlers had a signature of (event, data, change, editor), but now they have a signature of just (event, editor, next). This leads to simpler internal Slate logic, and less complex relationship dependencies between plugins. All of the information inside the old data argument can be accessed via the similar properties on the event argument, or via the getEventRange, getEventTransfer and setEventTransfer helpers.

NEW

Added a new setEventTransfer helper. This is useful if you're working with onDrop or onPaste event and you want to set custom data in the event, to retrieve later or for others to consume. It takes a data type and a value to set the type do.

Event handlers now have access to new events. The onClick, onCompositionEnd, onCompositionStart, onDragEnd, onDragEnter, onDragExit, onDragLeave, onDragOver, onDragStart, and onInput events are all now newly exposed. Your plugin logic can use them to solve some more advanced use cases, and even override the internal Slate logic when necessary. 99% of use cases won't require them still, but they can be useful to have when needed.


0.5.0 — October 15, 2017

DEPRECATED

The data objects in event handlers have been deprecated. There were a few different issues with these "helpers": data.key didn't account for international keyboards, many properties awkwardly duplicated information that was available on event.*, but not completely, and many properties were confusing as to when they applied. If you were using these, you'll now need to use the native event.* properties instead. There's also a helpful is-hotkey package for more complex hotkey matching.

NEW

Added a new getEventRange helper. This gets the affected Range of Slate document given a DOM event. This is useful in the onDrop or onPaste handlers to retrieve the range in the document where the drop or paste will occur.

Added a new getEventTransfer helper. This gets any Slate-related data from an event. It is modelled after the DOM's DataTransfer API, and is useful for retrieve the data being dropped or pasted in onDrop or onPaste events.


0.4.0 — October 14, 2017

BREAKING

Updated work with slate@0.27.0. The new version of Slate renames the old Range model to Leaf, and the old Selection model to Range.

NEW

Added a new findDOMRange helper. Give a Slate Range object, it will return a DOM Range object with the correct start and end points, making it easier to work with lower-level DOM selections.

Added a new findRange helper. Given either a DOM Selection or DOM Range object and a Slate State, it will return a Slate Range representing the same part of the document, making it easier to work with DOM selection changes.

Added a new findNode helper. Given a DOM Element, it will find the closest Slate Node that it represents, making


0.3.0 — October 13, 2017

BREAKING

The decoration logic has been updated to use slate@0.26.0. This allows for more complex decoration logic, and even decorations based on external information.


0.2.0 — September 29, 2017

BREAKING

onBeforeChange is now called automatically again in <Editor>. This was removed before, in attempt to decrease the "magic" that the editor was performing, since it normalizes when new props are passed to it, creating instant changes. But we discovered that it is actually necessary for now, so it has been added again.


0.1.0 — September 17, 2017

🎉