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Changelog

A list of changes to the slate package with each new version. Until 1.0.0 is released, breaking changes will be added as minor version bumps, and smaller changes won't be accounted for since the library is moving quickly.


0.44.0 — November 8, 2018

NEW

Introducing the child_min_invalid and child_max_invalid schema errors. These new schema errors map directly to the mix and max schema rule definitions, and make it easier to determine exactly what your normalization logic needs to do to fix the document.

Added new node retrieval methods. There are three new methdos for node retrieval. The first is getNodesAtRange which will retrieve all of the nodes in the tree in a given range. And the second two are getRootBlocksAtRange and getRootInlinesAtRange for retrieving the top-most blocks or inlines in a given range. These should be helpful in defining your own command logic.

BREAKING

Schema errors for min and max rules have changed. Previously they would result in errors of child_required, child_object_invalid, child_type_invalid and child_unknown. Now that we have the new child_min_invalid and child_max_invalid errors, these schema rules will return them instead, making it much easier to determine exactly which rule is causing a schema error.

DEPRECATED

The getBlocksAtRange and getInlinesAtRange methods have been renamed. To clear up confusion about which blocks and inlines are retrieve in the case of nesting, these two methods have been renamed to getLeafBlocksAtRange and getLeafInlinesAtRange to clarify that they retrieve the bottom-most nodes. And now there are two additional methods called getRootBlocksAtRange and getRootInlinesAtRange for cases where you want the top-most nodes instead.


0.43.0 — October 27, 2018

NEW

The editor.command and editor.query methods can take functions. Previously they only accepted a type string and would look up the command or query by type. Now, they also accept a custom function. This is helpful for plugin authors, who want to accept a "command option", since it gives users more flexibility to write one-off commands or queries. For example a plugin could be passed either:

Hotkey({
  hotkey: 'cmd+b',
  command: 'addBoldMark',
})

Or a custom command function:

Hotkey({
  hotkey: 'cmd+b',
  command: editor => editor.addBoldMark().moveToEnd(),
})
BREAKING

The Change object has been removed. The Change object as we know it previously has been removed, and all of its behaviors have been folded into the Editor controller. This includes the top-level commands and queries methods, as well as methods like applyOperation and normalize. All places that used to receive change now receive editor, which is API equivalent.

Changes are now flushed to onChange asynchronously. Previously this was done synchronously, which resulted in some strange race conditions in React environments. Now they will always be flushed asynchronously, just like setState.

The normalize* and validate* middleware signatures have changed! Previously the normalize* and validate* middleware was passed (node, next). However now, for consistency with the other middleware they are all passed (node, editor, next). This way, all middleware always receive editor and next as their final two arguments.

The editor.event method has been removed. Previously this is what you'd use when writing tests to simulate events being fired—which were slightly different to other running other middleware. With the simplification to the editor and to the newly-consistent middleware signatures, you can now use editor.run directly to simulate events:

editor.run('onKeyDown', { key: 'Tab', ... })
DEPRECATED

The editor.change method is deprecated. With the removal of the Change object, there's no need anymore to create the small closures with editor.change(). Instead you can directly invoke commands on the editor in series, and all of the changes will be emitted asynchronously on the next tick.

editor
  .insertText('word')
  .moveFocusForward(10)
  .addMark('bold')

The applyOperations method is deprecated. Instead you can loop a set of operations and apply each one using applyOperation. This is to reduce the number of methods exposed on the Editor to keep it simpler.

The change.call method is deprecated. Previously this was used to call a one-off function as a change method. Now this behavior is equivalent to calling editor.command(fn) instead.


0.42.0 — October 9, 2018

NEW

Introducing the Editor controller. Previously there was a vague editor concept, that was the React component itself. This was helpful, but because it was tightly coupled to React and the browser, it didn't lend itself to non-browser use cases well. This meant that the line between "model" and "controller/view" was blurred, and some concepts lived in both places at once, in inconsistent ways.

A new Editor controller now makes this relationship clear. It borrows many of its behaviors from the React <Editor> component. And the component actually just instantiates its own plain JavaScript Editor under the covers to delegate the work to.

This new concept powers a lot of the thinking in this new version, unlocking a lot of changes that bring a clearer separation of responsibilities to Slate. It allows us to create editors in any environment, which makes server-side use cases easier, brings parity to testing, and even opens us up to supporting other view layers like React Native or Vue.js in the future.

It has a familiar API, based on the existing editor concept:

const editor = new Editor({ plugins, value, onChange })

editor.change(change => {
  ...
})

However it also introduces imperative methods to make testing easier:

editor.run('renderNode', props)

editor.event('onKeyDown', event)

editor.command('addMark', 'bold')

editor.query('isVoid', node)

I'm very excited about it, so I hope you like it!

Introducing the "commands" concept. Previously, "change methods" were treated in a first-class way, but plugins had no easy way to add their own change methods that were reusable elsewhere. And they had no way to override the built-in logic for certain commands, for example splitBlock or insertText. However, now this is all customizable by plugins, with the core Slate plugin providing all of the previous default commands.

const plugin = {
  commands: {
    wrapQuote(change) {
      change.wrapBlock('quote')
    },
  },
}

Those commands are then available directly on the change objects, which are now editor-specific:

change.wrapQuote()

This allows you to define all of your commands in a single, easily-testable place. And then "behavioral" plugins can simply take command names as options, so that you have full control over the logic they trigger.

Introducing the "queries" concept. Similarly to the commands, queries allow plugins to define specific behaviors that the editor can be queried for in a reusable way, to be used when rendering buttons, or deciding on command behaviors, etc.

For example, you might define an getActiveList query:

const plugin = {
  queries: {
    getActiveList(editor) {},
  },
}

And then be able to re-use that logic easily in different places in your codebase, or pass in the query name to a plugin that can use your custom logic itself:

const list = change.getActiveList()

if (list) {
  ...
} else {
  ...
}

Taken together, commands and queries offer a better way for plugins to manage their inter-dependencies. They can take in command or query names as options to change their behaviors, or they can export new commands and queries that you can reuse in your codebase.

The middleware stack is now deferrable. With the introduction of the Editor controller, the middleware stack in Slate has also been upgraded. Each middleware now receives a next function (similar to Express or Koa) that allows you to choose whether to iterating the stack or not.

// Previously, you'd return `undefined` to continue.
function onKeyDown(event, editor, next) {
  if (event.key !== 'Enter') return
  ...
}

// Now, you call `next()` to continue...
function onKeyDown(event, editor, next) {
  if (event.key !== 'Enter') return next()
  ...
}

While that may seem inconvenient, it opens up an entire new behavior, which is deferring to the plugins later in the stack to see if they "handle" a specific case, and if not, handling it yourself:

function onKeyDown(event, editor, next) {
  if (event.key === 'Enter') {
    const handled = next()
    if (handled) return handled

    // Otherwise, handle `Enter` yourself...
  }
}

This is how all of the core logic in slate-react is now implemented, eliminating the need for a "before" and an "after" plugin that duplicate logic.

Under the covers, the schema, commands and queries concept are all implemented as plugins that attach varying middleware as well. For example, commands are processed using the onCommand middleware under the covers:

const plugin = {
  onCommand(command, editor, next) {
    ...
  }
}

This allows you to actually listen in to all commands, and override individual behaviors if you choose to do so, without having to override the command itself. This is a very advanced feature, which most people won't need, but it shows the flexibility provided by migrating all of the previously custom internal logic to be based on the new middleware stack.

Plugins can now be defined in nested arrays. This is a small addition, but it means that you no longer need to differentiate between individual plugins and multiple plugins in an array. This allows plugins to be more easily composed up from multiple other plugins themselves, without the end user having to change how they use them. Small, but encourages reuse just a little bit more.

DEPRECATED

The slate-simulator is deprecated. Previously this was used as a pseudo-controller for testing purposes. However, now with the new Editor controller as a first-class concept, everything the simulator could do can now be done directly in the library. This should make testing in non-browser environments much easier to do.

BREAKING

The Value object is no longer tied to changes. Previously, you could create a new Change by calling value.change() and retrieve a new value. With the re-architecture to properly decouple the schema, commands, queries and plugins from the core Slate data models, this is no longer possible. Instead, changes are always created via an Editor instance, where those concepts live.

// Instead of...
const { value } = this.state
const change = value.change()
...
this.onChange(change)

// You now would do...
this.editor.change(change => {
  const { value } = change
  ...
})

Sometimes this means you will need to store the React ref of the editor to be able to access its editor.change method in your React components.

Remove the Stack "model", in favor of the new Editor. Previously there was a pseudo-model called the Stack that was very low level, and not really a model. This concept has now been rolled into the new Editor controller, which can be used in any environment because it's just plain JavaScript. There was almost no need to directly use a Stack instance previously, so this change shouldn't affect almost anyone.

Remove the Schema "model", in favor of the new Editor. Previously there was another pseudo-model called the Schema, that was used to contain validation logic. All of the same validation features are still available, but the old Schema model is now rolled into the Editor controller as well, in the form of an internal SchemaPlugin that isn't exposed.

Remove the schema.isVoid and schema.isAtomic in favor of queries. Previously these two methods were used to query the schema about the behavior of a specific node or decoration. Now these same queries as possible using the "queries" concept, and are available directly on the change object:

if (change.isVoid(node)) {
  ...
}

The middleware stack must now be explicitly continued, using next. Previously returning undefined from a middleware would (usually) continue the stack onto the next middleware. Now, with middleware taking a next function argument you must explicitly decide to continue the stack by call next() yourself.

Remove the History model, in favor of commands. Previously there was a History model that stored the undo/redo stacks, and managing saving new operations to those stacks. All of this logic has been folded into the new "commands" concept, and the undo/redo stacks now live in value.data. This has the benefit of allowing the history behavior to be completely overridable by userland plugins, which was not an easy feat to manage before.

Values can no longer be normalized on creation. With the decoupling of the data model and the plugin layer, the schema rules are no longer available inside the Value model. This means that you can no longer receive a "normalized" value without having access to the Editor and its plugins.

// While previously you could attach a `schema` to a value...
const normalized = Value.create({ ..., schema })

// Now you'd need to do that with the `editor`...
const value = Value.create({ ... })
const editor = new Editor({ value, plugins: [{ schema }] })
const normalized = editor.value

While this seems inconvenient, it makes the boundaries in the API much more clear, and keeps the immutable and mutable concepts separated. This specific code sample gets longer, but the complexities elsewhere in the library are removed.

The Change class is no longer exported. Changes are now editor-specific, so exporting the Change class no longer makes sense. Instead, you can use the editor.change() API to receive a new change object with the commands and queries specific to your editor's plugins.

The getClosestVoid, getDecorations and hasVoidParent method now take an editor. Previously these Node methods took a schema argument, but this has been replaced with the new editor controller instead now that the Schema model has been removed.


0.41.0 — September 21, 2018

DEPRECATED

The withoutNormalization helper has been renamed to withoutNormalizing. This is to stay consistent with the new helpers for withoutSaving and withoutMerging.

BREAKING

The the "operation flags" concept was removed. This was a confusing concept that was implemented in multiple different ways and led to the logic around normalizing, saving, and merging operations being more complex than it needed to be. These flags have been replaced with three simpler helper functions: withoutNormalizing, withoutSaving and withoutMerging.

change.withoutNormalizing(() => {
  nodes.forEach(node => change.removeNodeByKey(node.key))
})
change.withoutSaving(() => {
  change.setValue({ decorations })
})

This means that you no longer use the { normalize: false } or { save: false } options as arguments to individual change methods, and instead use these new helper methods to apply these behaviors to groups of changes at once.

The "normalize" change methods have been removed. Previously there were a handful of different normalization change methods like normalizeNodeByPath, normalizeParentByKey, etc. These were confusing because it put the onus on the implemented to know exact which nodes needed to be normalized. They have been removed, and implementers no longer ever need to worry about which specific nodes to normalize, as Slate will handle that for them.

The internal refindNode and refindPath methods were removed. These should never have been exposed in the first place, and are now no longer present on the Element interface. These were only used internally during the normalization process.


0.40.0 — August 22, 2018

BREAKING

Remove all previously deprecated code paths. This helps to reduce some of the complexity in Slate by not having to handle these code paths anymore. And it helps to reduce file size. When upgrading, it's highly recommended that you upgrade to the previous version first and ensure there are no deprecation warnings being logged, then upgrade to this version.


0.39.0 — August 22, 2018

NEW

Introducing the Range model and interface. Previously the "range" concept was used in multiple different places, for the selection, for decorations, and for acting on ranges of the document. This worked okay, but it was hiding the underlying system which is that Range is really an interface that other models can choose to implement. Now, we still use the Range model for referencing parts of the document, but it can also be implemented by other models that need to attach more semantic meaning...

Introducing the Decoration and Selection models. These two new models both implement the new Range interface. Where previously they had to mis-use the Range model itself with added semantics. This just cleans up some of the confusion around overlapping properties, and allows us to add even more domain-specific methods and properties in the future without trouble.

BREAKING

Decorations have changed! Previously, decorations piggybacked on the Range model, using the existing marks property, and introducing their own isAtomic property. However, they have now been split out into their own Decoration model with a single mark and with the isAtomic property controlled by the schema. What previously would have looked like:

Range.create({
  anchor: { ... },
  focus: { ... },
  marks: [{ type: 'highlight' }],
  isAtomic: true,
})

Is now:

Decoration.create({
  anchor: { ... },
  focus: { ... },
  mark: { type: 'highlight' },
})

Each decoration maps to a single mark object. And the atomicity of the mark controlled in the schema instead, for example:

const schema = {
  marks: {
    highlight: {
      isAtomic: true,
    },
  },
}

The Range model has reduced semantics. Previously, since all decorations and selections were ranges, you could create ranges with an isFocused, isAtomic or marks properties. Now Range objects are much simpler, offering only an anchor and a focus, and can be extended by other models implementing the range interface. However, this means that using Range.create or document.createRange might not be what you want anymore. For example, for creating a new selection, you used to use:

const selection = document.createRange({
  isFocused: true,
  anchor: { ... },
  focus: { ... },
})

But now, you'll need to use document.createSelection instead:

const selection = document.createSelection({
  isFocused: true,
  anchor: { ... },
  focus: { ... },
})

The value.decorations property is no longer nullable. Previously when no decorations were applied to the value, the decorations property would be set to null. Now it will be an empty List object, so that the interface is more consistent.

DEPRECATED

The Node.createChildren static method is deprecated. This was just an alias for Node.createList and wasn't necessary. You can use Node.createList going forward for the same effect.

The renderPortal property of plugins is deprecated. This allows slate-react to be slightly slimmer, since this behavior can be handled in React 16 with the new <React.Fragment> using the renderEditor property instead, in a way that offers more control over the portal behavior.

The data property of plugins is deprecated. This property wasn't well designed and circumvented the core tenet that all changes to the value object will flow through operations inside Change objects. It was mostly used for view-layer state which should be handled with React-specific conventions for state management instead.


0.38.0 — August 21, 2018

DEPRECATED

Node.isVoid access is deprecated. Previously the "voidness" of a node was hardcoded in the data model. Soon it will be determined at runtime based on your editor's schema. This deprecation just ensures that you aren't using the node.isVoid property which will not work in future verisons. What previously would have been:

if (node.isVoid) {
  ...
}

Now becomes:

if (schema.isVoid(node)) {
  ...
}

This requires you to have a reference to the schema object, which can be access as value.schema.

Value.isFocused/isBlurred and Value.hasUndos/hasRedos are deprecated. These properties are easily available via value.selection and value.history instead, and are now deprecated to reduce the complexity and number of different ways of doing things.


0.37.0 — August 3, 2018

NEW

Introducing the Point model. Ranges are now built up of two Point models—an anchor and a focus—instead of having the properties set directly on the range itself. This makes the "point" concept first-class in Slate and better API's can be built around point objects.

Point.create({
  key: 'a',
  path: [0, 0],
  offset: 31,
})

These points are exposed on Range objects via the anchor, focus, start and end properties:

const { anchor, focus } = range
change.removeNodeByKey(anchor.key)

These replace the earlier anchorKey, anchorOffset, etc. properties.

Document.createRange creates a relative range. Previously you'd have to use Range.create and make sure that you passed valid arguments, and ensure that you "normalized" the range to sync its keys and paths. This is no longer the case, since the createRange method will do it for you.

const range = document.createRange({
  anchor: {
    key: 'a',
    offset: 1,
  },
  focus: {
    key: 'a',
    offset: 4,
  },
})

This will automatically ensure that the range references leaf text nodes, and that its anchor and focus paths are set.

Document.createPoint creates a relative point. Just like the createRange method, createPoint will create a point that is guaranteed to be relative to the document itself. This is often a lot easier than using Point.create directly.

const anchor = document.createPoint({
  key: 'a',
  offset: 1,
})
BREAKING

The Range.focus method was removed. (Not Change.focus!) This was necessary to make way for the new range.focus point property. Usually this would have been done in a migration-friendly way like the rest of the method changes in this release, but this was an exception. However the change.focus() method is still available and works as expected.

Range.set and Range.merge are dangerous. If you were previously using the super low-level Immutable.js methods range.set or range.merge with any of the now-removed properties of ranges, these invocations will fail. Instead, you should use the range.set* helpers going forward which can be migrated with deprecations warnings instead of failing outright.

The offset property of points defaults to null. Previously it would default to 0 but that could be confusing because it made no distinction from a "set" or "unset" offset. Now they default to null instead. This shouldn't really affect any real-world usage of Slate.

The Range.toJSON() structure has changed. With the introduction of points, the range now returns its anchor and focus properties as nested point JSON objects instead of directly as properties. For example:

{
  "object": "range",
  "anchor": {
    "object": "point",
    "key": "a",
    "offset": 1,
    "path": [0, 0]
  },
  "focus": {
    "object": "point",
    "key": "a",
    "offset": 3,
    "path": [0, 0]
  },
  "isAtomic": false,
  "isFocused": false,
  "marks": []
}
DEPRECATED

The selection-based shorts on Value were deprecated. Previously you could access things like anchorKey, startOffset and isCollapsed directly on Value objects. This results in extra duplication that is hard to maintain over time, and hard for newcomers to understand, without much benefit. All of these properties are deprecated and should be accessed on the value.selection object directly instead.

The Range methods were standardized, with many deprecated. The methods on Range objects had grown drastically in size. Many of them weren't consistently named, or overlapped in unnecessary ways. With the introduction of Point objects a lot of these methods could be cleaned up and their logic delegated to the points directly. All of these methods remain available but will raise deprecation warnings, making it easier to upgrade.

There's a very good chance you're only using a handful of them in your codebase. Either way, all of them will log warnings. For an example of migrating see this commit.

Here's a full list of the newly deprecated methods and properties, and their new alternative if one exists:

anchorKey -> anchor.key
anchorOffset -> anchor.offset
anchorPath -> anchor.path
blur -> setIsFocused
collapseTo -> moveTo
collapseToAnchor -> moveToAnchor
collapseToEnd -> moveToEnd
collapseToEndOf -> moveToEndOfNode
collapseToFocus -> moveToFocus
collapseToStart -> moveToStart
collapseToStartOf -> moveToStartOfNode
deselect -> Range.create
endKey -> end.key
endOffset -> end.offset
endPath -> end.path
extend -> moveFocus
extendTo -> moveFocusTo
extendToEndOf -> moveFocusToEndOfNode
extendToStartOf -> moveFocusToStartOfNode
focusKey -> focus.key
focusOffset -> focus.offset
focusPath -> focus.path
hasAnchorAtEndOf -> anchor.isAtEndOfNode
hasAnchorAtStartOf -> anchor.isAtStartOfNode
hasAnchorBetween ->
hasAnchorIn -> anchor.isInNode
hasEdgeAtEndOf -> anchor.isAtEndOfNode || focus.isAtEndOfNode
hasEdgeAtStartOf -> anchor.isAtStartOfNode || focus.isAtStartOfNode
hasEdgeBetween ->
hasEdgeIn -> anchor.isInNode || focus.isInNode
hasEndAtEndOf -> end.isAtEndOfNode
hasEndAtStartOf -> end.isAtEndOfNode
hasEndBetween ->
hasEndIn -> end.isInNode
hasFocusAtEndOf -> focus.isAtEndOfNode
hasFocusAtStartOf -> focus.isAtStartOfNode
hasFocusBetween ->
hasFocusIn -> focus.isInNode
hasStartAtEndOf -> start.isAtEndOfNode
hasStartAtStartOf -> start.isAtStartOfNode
hasStartBetween ->
hasStartIn -> start.isInNode
isAtEndOf -> isCollapsed && anchor.isAtEndOfNode
isAtStartOf -> isCollapsed && anchor.isAtStartOfNode
move -> moveForward/Backward
moveAnchor -> moveAnchorForward/Backward
moveAnchorOffsetTo -> moveAnchorTo
moveAnchorOffsetTo -> moveAnchorTo
moveAnchorToEndOf -> moveAnchorToEndOfNode
moveAnchorToStartOf -> moveAnchorToStartOfNode
moveEnd -> moveEndForward/Backward
moveEndOffsetTo -> moveEndTo
moveFocus -> moveFocusForward/Backward
moveFocusOffsetTo -> moveFocusTo
moveFocusOffsetTo -> moveFocusTo
moveFocusToEndOf -> moveFocusToEndOfNode
moveFocusToStartOf -> moveFocusToStartOfNode
moveOffsetsTo -> moveAnchorTo && moveFocusTo
moveStart -> moveStartForward/Backward
moveStartOffsetTo -> moveStartTo
moveToEndOf -> moveToEndOfNode
moveToRangeOf -> moveToRangeOfNode
moveToStartOf -> moveToStartOfNode
startKey -> start.key
startOffset -> start.offset
startPath -> start.path

The selection-based changes were standardized, with many deprecated. Similarly to the Range method deprecations, the same confusion and poor naming choices existed in the Change methods that dealt with selections. Many of them have been renamed for consistency, or deprecated when alternatives existed. All of these methods remain available but will raise deprecation warnings, making it easier to upgrade.

There's a very good chance you're only using a handful of these change methods in your codebase. Either way, all of them will log warnings. For an example of migrating see this commit.

Here's a full list of the newly deprecated changed methods, and their new alternative if one exists:

collapseCharBackward -> moveBackward
collapseCharForward -> moveForward
collapseLineBackward -> moveToStartOfBlock
collapseLineForward -> moveToEndOfBlock
collapseTo -> moveTo
collapseToAnchor -> moveToAnchor
collapseToEnd -> moveToEnd
collapseToEndOf -> moveToEndOfNode
collapseToEndOfBlock -> moveToEndOfBlock
collapseToEndOfNextBlock -> moveToEndOfNextBlock
collapseToEndOfNextText -> moveToEndOfNextText
collapseToEndOfPreviousBlock -> moveToEndOfPreviousBlock
collapseToEndOfPreviousText -> moveToEndOfPreviousText
collapseToFocus -> moveToFocus
collapseToStart -> moveToStart
collapseToStartOf -> moveToStartOfNode
collapseToStartOfBlock -> moveToStartOfBlock
collapseToStartOfNextBlock -> moveToStartOfNextBlock
collapseToStartOfNextText -> moveToStartOfNextText
collapseToStartOfPreviousBlock -> moveToStartOfPreviousBlock
collapseToStartOfPreviousText -> moveToStartOfPreviousText
extend -> moveFocusForward/Backward
extendCharBackward -> moveFocusBackward
extendCharForward -> moveFocusForward
extendLineBackward -> moveFocusToStartOfBlock
extendLineForward -> moveFocusToEndOfBlock
extendTo -> moveFocusTo
extendToEndOf -> moveFocusToEndOfNode
extendToEndOfBlock -> moveFocusToEndOfBlock
extendToEndOfNextBlock -> moveFocusToEndOfNextBlock
extendToEndOfNextInline -> moveFocusToEndOfNextInline
extendToEndOfNextText -> moveFocusToEndOfNextText
extendToEndOfPreviousBlock -> moveFocusToEndOfPreviousBlock
extendToEndOfPreviousInline -> moveFocusToEndOfPreviousInline
extendToEndOfPreviousText -> moveFocusToEndOfPreviousText
extendToStartOf -> moveFocusToStartOfNode
extendToStartOfBlock -> moveFocusToStartOfBlock
extendToStartOfNextBlock -> moveFocusToStartOfNextBlock
extendToStartOfNextInline -> moveFocusToStartOfNextInline
extendToStartOfNextText -> moveFocusToStartOfNextText
extendToStartOfPreviousBlock -> moveFocusToStartOfPreviousBlock
extendToStartOfPreviousInline -> moveFocusToStartOfPreviousInline
extendToStartOfPreviousText -> moveFocusToStartOfPreviousText
move -> moveForward/Backward
moveAnchor -> moveAnchorForward/Backward
moveAnchorCharBackward -> moveAnchorBackward
moveAnchorCharForward -> moveAnchorForward
moveAnchorOffsetTo -> moveAnchorTo
moveAnchorToEndOf -> moveAnchorToEndOfNode
moveAnchorToStartOf -> moveAnchorToEndOfNode
moveCharBackward -> moveBackward
moveCharForward -> moveForward
moveEnd -> moveEndForward/Backward
moveEndCharBackward -> moveEndBackward
moveEndCharForward -> moveEndForward
moveEndOffsetTo -> moveEndTo
moveFocus -> moveFocusForward/Backward
moveFocusCharBackward -> moveFocusBackward
moveFocusCharForward -> moveFocusForward
moveFocusOffsetTo -> moveFocusTo
moveFocusToEndOf -> moveFocusToEndOfNode
moveFocusToStartOf -> moveFocusToEndOfNode
moveOffsetsTo -> moveAnchorTo/moveFocusTo
moveStart -> moveStartForward/Backward
moveStartCharBackward -> moveStartBackward
moveStartCharForward -> moveStartForward
moveStartOffsetTo -> moveStartTo
moveToEndOf -> moveToEndOfNode
moveToRangeOf -> moveToRangeOfNode
moveToStartOf -> moveToStartOfNode
selectAll -> moveToRangeOfDocument

0.36.0 — July 27, 2018

BREAKING

Schema rules have changed! To make them able to be used in more cases (so you don't have to dip down to the slower validateNode/normalizeNode function), the matching syntax for schema rules has changed. Previously multiples types/objects would be expressed as:

{
  parent: { types: ['ordered_list', 'unordered_list'] },
}

Now there is a new match object concept, which looks like:

{
  parent: { object: 'block', type: 'list' },
}

Match objects can be objects, or an array of objects which acts as OR:

{
  parent: [{ type: 'ordered_list' }, { type: 'unordered_list' }],
}

Additionally, schema rules can now be defined using a schema.rules array of objects with top-level match properties. This allows for matching nodes in ways that were previously impossible. For example:

{
  schema: {
    rules: [{
      // Match all blocks, regardless of type!
      match: { object: 'block' },
      text: /.../g,
      normalize: () => { ... },
    }]
  }
}

All of the shorthands like schema.blocks and schema.inlines are still available, and are simply rewritten to the more flexible rules syntax under the covers. These changes are just a small way of making Slate more flexible for advanced use cases when you run into them.

Schema rule normalize functions now receive SlateError objects. Previously they would be called with a signature of (change, violation, context). They are now called with (change, error). This new error is a SlateError object with an error.code and all of the same context properties.

A normalizer that previously looked like:

{
  normalize: (change, violation, context) {
    if (violation === 'child_type_invalid') {
      const type = index === 0 ? 'title' : 'paragraph'
      return change.setNodeByKey(context.child.key, type)
    }
  }
}

Would now look like:

{
  normalize: (change, error) {
    if (error.code === 'child_type_invalid') {
      const type = index === 0 ? 'title' : 'paragraph'
      return change.setNodeByKey(error.child.key, type)
    }
  }
}

This is just an attempt to make dealing with normalization errors slightly more idiomatic with how errors are represented in most libraries, in order to not reinvent the wheel unnecessarily.


0.35.0 — July 27, 2018

NEW

Range objects now keep track of paths, in addition to keys. Previously ranges only stored their points as keys. Now both paths and keys are used, which allows you to choose which one is the most convenient or most performant for your use case. They are kept in sync my Slate under the covers.

A new set of *ByPath change methods have been added. All of the changes you could previously do with a *ByKey change are now also supported with a *ByPath change of the same name. The path-based changes are often more performant than the key-based ones.

Paths are now of type List instead of array. See the documentation of List for its differences to array (get method instead of array indexing, size instead of length, etc).

BREAKING

Internal-yet-public Node methods have been changed. There were a handful of internal methods that shouldn't be used in 99% of Slate implementations that updated or removed. This was done in the process of streamlining many of the Node methods to make them more consistent and easier to use. For a list of those affected:

  • Node.assertPath was changed. It was previously confusingly named because the equivalent Node.getPath did something completely different. You should now use Node.assertNode(path) if you need this behavior.
  • Node.removeDescendant was removed. There's no reason you should have been using this, since it was an undocumented and unused method that was left over from a previous version.
  • Node.updateNode, Node.insertNode, Node.removeNode, Node.splitNode and Node.mergeNode mutating methods were changed. All of your changes should be done with operations, so you likely weren't using these internal methods. They have been changed internally to use paths.
DEPRECATED

The setKeyGenerator and resetKeyGenerator helpers are deprecated. These were previously used to change the default key generation logic. Now you can use the equivalent KeyUtils.setGenerator and KeyUtils.resetGenerator helpers instead. This follows the new pattern of grouping related utilities into single namespaces, as is the case with the new PathUtils and TextUtils.

Internal-yet-public Node methods have been deprecated. There were a handful of internal methods that shouldn't be used in 99% of Slate implementations that were deprecated. For a list of those affected:

  • Node.getKeys and Node.getKeysAsArray were deprecated. If you really need to check the presence of a key, use the new Node.getKeysToPathsObject instead.
  • Node.areDescendantsSorted and Node.isInRange were deprecated. These were used to check whether a node was in a range, but this can be done more performantly and more easily with paths now.
  • Node.getNodeAtPath and Node.getDescendantAtPath were deprecated. These were probably not in use by anyone, but if you were using them you can use the existing Node.getNode and Node.getDescendant methods instead which now take either paths or keys.

0.34.0 — June 14, 2018

NEW

Decorations can now be "atomic". If you set a decoration as atomic, it will be removed when changed, preventing it from entering a "partial" state, which can be useful for some use cases.

BREAKING

Text nodes now represent their content as "leaves". Previously their immutable representation used individual Character instance for each character. Now they have changed to group characters into Leaf models, which more closely resembles how they are used, and results in a lot fewer immutable object instances floating around. For most people this shouldn't cause any issues, since this is a low-level aspect of Slate.

DEPRECATED

The Character model is deprecated. Although the character concept is still in the repository for now, it is deprecated and will be removed in a future release. Everything it solves can be solved with leaves instead.


0.33.0 — February 21, 2018

BREAKING

Void nodes no longer prescribe their text content. Previously void nodes would automatically normalize their text content to be a single text node containing ' ' an empty string of content. This restriction was removed, so that void nodes can have arbitrary content. You can use this to store information in void nodes in a way that is more consistent with non-void nodes.

DEPRECATED

The setBlock method has been renamed to setBlocks. This is to make it more clear that it operates on any of the current blocks in the selection, not just a single blocks.

The setInline method has been renamed to setInlines. For the same reason as setBlocks, to be clear and stay consistent.


0.32.0 — January 4, 2018

BREAKING

The kind property of Slate objects has been renamed to object. This is to reduce the confusion over the difference between "kind" and "type" which are practically synonyms. The "object" name was chosen to match the Stripe API, since it seems like a sensible choice and reads much more nicely when looking through JSON.

All normalization reasons containing kind have been renamed too. Previously there were normalization reason strings like child_kind_invalid. These types of strings have been renamed to child_object_invalid to stay consistent.


0.31.0 — November 16, 2017

NEW

Added a new Operation model. This model is used to store operations for the history stack, and (de)serializes them in a consistent way for collaborative editing use cases.

BREAKING

Operation objects in Slate are now immutable records. Previously they were native, mutable JavaScript objects. Now, there's a new immutable Operation model in Slate, ensuring that all of the data inside Value objects are immutable. And it allows for easy serialization of operations using operation.toJSON() for when sending them between editors. This should not affect most users, unless you are relying on changing the values of the low-level Slate operations (simply reading them is fine).

Operation lists in Slate are now immutable lists. Previously they were native, mutable JavaScript arrays. Now, to keep consistent with other immutable uses, they are immutable lists. This should not affect most users.


0.30.0 — October 27, 2017

BREAKING

Remove all previously deprecated code paths. This helps to reduce some of the complexity in Slate by not having to handle these code paths anymore. And it helps to reduce file size. When upgrading, it's highly recommended that you upgrade to the previous version first and ensure there are no deprecation warnings being logged, then upgrade to this version.


0.29.0 — October 27, 2017

NEW

Added the new Value model to replace State. The new model is exactly the same, but with a new name. There is also a shimmed State model exported that warns when used, to ease migration.

BREAKING

The set_state operation has been renamed set_value. This shouldn't affect almost anyone, but in the event that you were relying on the low-level operation types you'll need to update this.

DEPRECATED

The "state" has been renamed to "value" everywhere. All of the current references are maintained as deprecations, so you should be able to upgrade and see warnings logged instead of being greeted with a broken editor. This is to reduce the confusion between React's "state" and Slate's editor value, and in an effort to further mimic the native DOM APIs.


0.28.0 — October 25, 2017

NEW

State objects now have an embedded state.schema property. This new schema property is used to automatically normalize the state as it changes, according to the editor's current schema. This makes normalization much easier.

BREAKING

The Schema objects in Slate have changed! Previously, they used to be where you could define normalization rules, define rendering rules, and define decoration rules. This was overloaded, and made other improvements hard. Now, rendering and decorating is done via the newly added plugin functions (renderNode, renderMark, decorateNode). And validation is done either via the lower-level validateNode plugin function, or via the new schema objects.

The normalize* change methods no longer take a schema argument. Previously you had to maintain a reference to your schema, and pass it into the normalize methods when you called them. Since State objects now have an embedded state.schema property, this is no longer needed.


0.27.0 — October 14, 2017

BREAKING

The Range model is now called Leaf. This is to disambiguate with the concept of "ranges" that is used throughout the codebase to be synonymous to selections. For example in methods like getBlocksAtRange(selection).

The text.ranges property in the JSON representation is now text.leaves. When passing in JSON with text.ranges you'll now receive a deprecation warning in the console in development.

DEPRECATED

The Selection model is now called Range. This is to make it more clear what a "selection" really is, to make many of the other methods that act on "ranges" make sense, and to more closely parallel the native DOM API for selections and ranges. A mock Selection object is still exported with deprecated static methods, to make the transition to the new API easier.

The Text.getRanges() method is now Text.getLeaves(). It will still work, and it will return a list of leaves, but you will see a deprecation warning in the console in development.


0.26.0 — October 13, 2017

BREAKING

The decorate function of schema rules has changed. Previously, in decorate you would receive a text node and the matched node, and you'd need to manually add any marks you wanted to the text node's characters. Now, "decorations" have changed to just be Selection objects with marks in the selection.marks property. Instead of applying the marks yourself, you simply return selection ranges with the marks to be applied, and Slate will apply them internally. This makes it possible to write much more complex decoration behaviors. Check out the revamped code-highlighting example and the new search-highlighting example to see this in action.

The set_data operation type has been replaced by set_state. With the new state.decorations property, it doesn't make sense to have a new operation type for every property of State objects. Instead, the new set_state operation more closely mimics the existing set_mark and set_node operations.

DEPRECATED
NEW

You can now set decorations based on external information. Previously, the "decoration" logic in Slate was always based off of the text of a node, and would only re-render when that text changed. Now, there is a new state.decorations property that you can set via change.setState({ decorations }). You can use this to add presentation-only marks to arbitrary ranges of text in the document. Check out the new search-highlighting example to see this in action.

The setData change method has been replaced by setState. Previously you would call change.setData(data). But as new State properties are introduced it doesn't make sense to need to add new change methods each time. Instead, the new change.setState(properties) more closesely mimics the existing setMarkByKey and setNodeByKey. To achieve the old behavior, you can do change.setState({ data }).

The preserveStateData option of state.toJSON has changed. The same behavior is now called preserveData instead. This makes it consistent with all of the existing options, and the new preserveDecorations option as well.


0.25.0 — September 21, 2017

BREAKING

The insertBlock change method no longer replaces empty blocks. Previously if you used insertBlock and the selection was in an empty block, it would replace it. Now you'll need to perform that check yourself and use the new replaceNodeByKey method instead.

The Block.create and Inline.create methods no longer normalize. Previously if you used one of them to create a block or inline with zero nodes in it, they would automatically add a single empty text node as the only child. This was unexpected in certain situations, and if you were relying on this you'll need to handle it manually instead now.


0.24.0 — September 11, 2017

NEW

Slate is now a "monorepo". Instead of a single package, Slate has been divided up into individual packages so that you can only require what you need, cutting down on file size. In the process, some helpful modules that used to be internal-only are now exposed.

There's a new slate-hyperscript helper. This was possible thanks to the work on slate-sugar, which paved the way.

The slate-prop-types package is now exposed. Previously this was an internal module, but now you can use it for adding prop types to any components or plugins you create.

The slate-simulator package is now exposed. Previously this was an internal testing utility, but now you can use it in your own tests as well. It's currently pretty bare bones, but we can add to it over time.

BREAKING

immutable is now a peer dependency of Slate. Previously it was a regular dependency, but this prevented you from bringing your own version, or you'd have duplication. You'll need to ensure you install it!

The Html, Plain and Raw serializers are broken into new packages. Previously you'd import them from slate. But now you'll import them from slate-html-serializer and slate-plain-serializer. And the Raw serializer that was deprecated is now removed.

The Editor and Placeholder components are broken into a new React-specific package. Previously you'd import them from slate. But now you import { Editor } from 'slate-react' instead.


0.23.0 — September 10, 2017

NEW

Slate models now have Model.fromJSON(object) and model.toJSON() methods. These methods operate with the canonical JSON form (which used to be called "raw"). This way you don't need to import a serializer to retrieve JSON, if you have the model you can serialize/deserialize.

Models also have toJS and fromJS aliases. This is just to match Immutable.js objects, which have both methods. For Slate though, the methods are equivalent.

BREAKING

The isNative property of State has been removed. Previously this was used for performance reasons to avoid re-rendering, but it is no longer needed. This shouldn't really affect most people because it's rare that you'd be relying on this property to exist.

DEPRECATED

The Raw serializer is now deprecated. The entire "raw" concept is being removed, in favor of allowing all models to be able to serialize and deserialize to JSON themselves. Instead of using the Raw serializer, you can now use the fromJSON and toJSON on the models directly.

The toRaw options for the Plain and Html serializers are now called toJSON. This is to stay symmetrical with the removal of the "raw" concept everywhere.

The terse option for JSON serialization has been deprecated! This option causes lots of abstraction leakiness because it means there is no one canonical JSON representation of objects. You had to work with either terse or not terse data.

The Html serializer no longer uses the terse representation. This shouldn't actually be an issue for anyone because the main manifestation of this has a deprecation notice with a patch in place for now.

The defaultBlockType of the Html serializer is now called defaultBlock. This is just to make it more clear that it supports not only setting the default type but also data and isVoid.


0.22.0 — September 5, 2017

NEW

The state.activeMarks returns the intersection of marks in the selection. Previously there was only state.marks which returns marks that appeared on any character in the selection. But state.activeMarks returns marks that appear on every character in the selection, which is often more useful for implementing standard rich-text editor behaviors.

BREAKING

The Plain serializer now adds line breaks between blocks. Previously between blocks the text would be joined without any space whatsoever, but this wasn't really that useful or what you'd expect.

The toggleMark transform now checks the intersection of marks. Previously, toggling would remove the mark from the range if any of the characters in a range didn't have it. However, this wasn't what all other rich-text editors did, so the behavior has changed to mimic the standard behavior. Now, if any characters in the selection have the mark applied, it will first be added when toggling.

The .length property of nodes has been removed. This property caused issues with code like in Lodash that checked for "array-likeness" by simply looking for a .length property that was a number.

onChange now receives a Change object (previously named Transform) instead of a State. This is needed because it enforces that all changes are represented by a single set of operations. Otherwise right now it's possible to do things like state.transform()....apply({ save: false }).transform()....apply() and result in losing the operation information in the history. With OT, we need all transforms that may happen to be exposed and emitted by the editor. The new syntax looks like:

onChange(change) {
  this.setState({ state: change.state })
}

onChange({ state }) {
  this.setState({ state })
}

Similarly, handlers now receive e, data, change instead of e, data, state. Instead of doing return state.transform()....apply() the plugins can now act on the change object directly. Plugins can still return change... if they want to break the stack from continuing on to other plugins. (Any != null value will break out.) But they can also now not return anything, and the stack will apply their changes and continue onwards. This was previously impossible. The new syntax looks like:

function onKeyDown(e, data, change) {
  if (data.key == 'enter') {
    return change.splitBlock()
  }
}

The onChange and on[Before]Change handlers now receive Change objects. Previously they would also receive a state object, but now they receive change objects like the rest of the plugin API.

The .apply({ save }) option is now state.change({ save }) instead. This is the easiest way to use it, but requires that you know whether to save or not up front. If you want to use it inline after already saving some changes, you can use the change.setOperationFlag('save', true) flag instead. This shouldn't be necessary for 99% of use cases though.

The .undo() and .redo() transforms don't save by default. Previously you had to specifically tell these transforms not to save into the history, which was awkward. Now they won't save the operations they're undoing/redoing by default.

onBeforeChange is no longer called from componentWillReceiveProps, when a new state is passed in as props to the <Editor> component. This caused lots of state-management issues and was weird in the first place because passing in props would result in changes firing. It is now the parent component's responsibility to not pass in improperly formatted State objects.

The splitNodeByKey change method has changed to be shallow. Previously, it would deeply split to an offset. But now it is shallow and another splitDescendantsByKey change method has been added (with a different signature) for the deep splitting behavior. This is needed because splitting and joining operations have been changed to all be shallow, which is required so that operational transforms can be written against them.

Blocks cannot have mixed "inline" and "block" children anymore. Blocks were implicitly expected to either contain "text" and "inline" nodes only, or to contain "block" nodes only. Invalid case are now normalized by the core schema.

The shape of many operations has changed. This was needed to make operations completely invertible without any extra context. The operations were never really exposed in a consumable way, so I won't detail all of the changes here, but feel free to look at the source to see the details.

All references to "joining" nodes is now called "merging". This is to be slightly clearer, since merging can only happen with adjacent nodes already, and to have a nicer parallel with "splitting", as in cells. The operation is now called merge_node, and the transforms are now merge*.

DEPRECATED

The transform.apply() method is deprecated. Previously this is where the saving into the history would happen, but it created an awkward convention that wasn't necessary. Now operations are saved into the history as they are created with change methods, instead of waiting until the end. You can access the new State of a change at any time via change.state.


0.21.0 — July 20, 2017

BREAKING

The Html serializer now uses DOMParser instead of cheerio. Previously, the Html serializer used the cheerio library for representing elements in the serialization rule logic, but cheerio was a very large dependency. It has been removed, and the native browser DOMParser is now used instead. All HTML serialization rules will need to be updated. If you are working with Slate on the server, you can now pass in a custom serializer to the Html constructor, using the parse5 library.


0.20.0 — May 17, 2017

BREAKING

Returning null from the Html serializer skips the element. Previously, null and undefined had the same behavior of skipping the rule and trying the rest of the rules. Now if you explicitly return null it will skip the element itself.


0.19.0 — March 3, 2017

BREAKING

The filterDescendants and findDescendants methods are now depth-first. This shouldn't affect almost anyone, since they are usually not the best things to be using for performance reasons. If you happen to have a very specific use case that needs breadth-first, (or even likely something better), you'll need to implement it yourself.

DEPRECATED

Some Node methods have been deprecated! There were a few methods that had been added over time that were either poorly named that have been deprecated and renamed, and a handful of methods that are no longer useful for the core library that have been deprecated. Here's a full list:

  • areDescendantSorted -> areDescendantsSorted
  • getHighestChild -> getFurthestAncestor
  • getHighestOnlyChildParent -> getFurthestOnlyChildAncestor
  • concatChildren
  • decorateTexts
  • filterDescendantsDeep
  • findDescendantDeep
  • getChildrenBetween
  • getChildrenBetweenIncluding
  • isInlineSplitAtRange

0.18.0 — March 2, 2017

BREAKING

The plugin.render property is now called plugin.renderPortal. This is to make way for the new plugin.render property that offers HOC-like behavior, so that plugins can augment the editor however they choose.


0.17.0 — February 27, 2017

DEPRECATED

Some Selection methods have been deprecated! Previously there were many inconsistencies in the naming and handling of selection changes. This has all been cleaned up, but in the process some methods have been deprecated. Here is a full list of the deprecated methods and their new alternatives:

  • moveToOffsets -> moveOffsetsTo
  • moveForward -> move
  • moveBackward -> move
  • moveAnchorOffset -> moveAnchor
  • moveFocusOffset -> moveFocus
  • moveStartOffset -> moveStart
  • moveEndOffset -> moveEnd
  • extendForward -> extend
  • extendBackward -> extend
  • unset -> deselect

Some selection transforms have been deprecated! Along with the methods, the selection-based transforms have also been refactored, resulting in deprecations. Here is a full list of the deprecated transforms and their new alternatives:

  • moveTo -> select
  • moveToOffsets -> moveOffsetsTo
  • moveForward -> move
  • moveBackward -> move
  • moveStartOffset -> moveStart
  • moveEndOffset -> moveEnd
  • extendForward -> extend
  • extendBackward -> extend
  • flipSelection -> flip
  • unsetSelection -> deselect
  • unsetMarks

0.16.0 — December 2, 2016

BREAKING

Inline nodes are now always surrounded by text nodes. Previously this behavior only occured for inline nodes with isVoid: true. Now, all inline nodes will always be surrounded by text nodes. If text nodes don't exist, empty ones will be created. This allows for more consistent behavior across Slate, and parity with other editing experiences.


0.15.0 - November 17, 2016

BREAKING

The unique key generated values have changed. Previously, Slate generated unique keys that looked like '9dk3'. But they were not very conflict-resistant. Now the keys are simple string of auto-incrementing numbers, like '0', '1', '2'. This makes more clear that keys are simply a convenient way to uniquely reference nodes in the short-term lifespan of a single in-memory instance of Slate. They are not designed to be used for long-term uniqueness. A new setKeyGenerator function has been exported that allows you to pass in your own key generating mechanism if you want to ensure uniqueness.

The Raw serializer doesn't preserve keys by default. Previously, the Raw serializer would omit keys when passed the terse: true option, but preserve them without it. Now it will always omit keys, unless you pass the new preserveKeys: true option. This better reflects that keys are temporary, in-memory IDs.

Operations on the document now update the selection when needed. This won't affect you unless you were doing some very specific things with transforms and updating selections. Overall, this makes it much easier to write transforms, since in most cases, the underlying operations will update the selection as you would expect without you doing anything.

DEPRECATED

Node accessor methods no longer accept being passed another node! Previously, node accessor methods like node.getParent could be passed either a key string or a node object. For performance reasons, passing in a node object is being deprecated. So if you have any calls that look like: node.getParent(descendant), they will now need to be written as node.getParent(descendant.key). They will throw a warning for now, and will throw an error in a later version of Slate.


0.14.0 — September 10, 2016

BREAKING

The undo and redo transforms need to be applied! Previously, undo and redo were special cased such that they did not require an .apply() call, and instead would return a new State directly. Now this is no longer the case, and they are just like every other transform.

Transforms are no longer exposed on State or Node. The transforms API has been completely refactored to be built up of "operations" for collaborative editing support. As part of this refactor, the transforms are now only available via the state.transform() API, and aren't exposed on the State or Node objects as they were before.

Transform objects are now mutable. Previously Transform was an Immutable.js Record, but now it is a simple constructor. This is because transforms are inherently mutating their representation of a state, but this decision is up for discussion.

The selection can now be "unset". Previously, a selection could never be in an "unset" state where the anchorKey or focusKey was null. This is no longer technically true, although this shouldn't really affect anyone in practice.


0.13.0 — August 15, 2016

BREAKING

The renderNode and renderMark properties are gone! Previously, rendering nodes and marks happened via these two properties of the <Editor>, but this has been replaced by the new schema property. Check out the updated examples to see how to define a schema! There's a good chance this eliminates extra code for most use cases! 😄

The renderDecorations property is gone! Decoration rendering has also been replaced by the new schema property of the <Editor>.


0.12.0 — August 9, 2016

BREAKING

The data.files property is now an Array. Previously it was a native FileList object, but needed to be changed to add full support for pasting an dropping files in all browsers. This shouldn't affect you unless you were specifically depending on it being array-like instead of a true Array.


0.11.0 — August 4, 2016

BREAKING

Void nodes are renderered implicitly again! Previously Slate had required that you wrap void node renderers yourself with the exposed <Void> wrapping component. This was to allow for selection styling, but a change was made to make selection styling able to handled in JavaScript. Now the <Void> wrapper will be implicitly rendered by Slate, so you do not need to worry about it, and "voidness" only needs to toggled in one place, the isVoid: true property of a node.


0.10.0 — July 29, 2016

BREAKING

Marks are now renderable as components. Previously the only supported way to render marks was by returning a style object. Now you can return a style object, a class name string, or a full React component. Because of this, the DOM will be renderered slightly differently than before, resulting in an extra <span> when rendering non-component marks. This won't affect you unless you were depending on the DOM output by Slate for some reason.


0.9.0 — July 28, 2016

BREAKING

The wrap and unwrap method signatures have changed! Previously, you would pass type and data as separate parameters, for example: wrapBlock('code', { src: true }). This was inconsistent with other transforms, and has been updated such that a single argument of properties is passed instead. So that example could now be: wrapBlock({ type: 'code', { data: { src: true }}). You can still pass a type string as shorthand, which will be the most frequent use case, for example: wrapBlock('code').


0.8.0 — July 27, 2016

BREAKING

The onKeyDown and onBeforeInput handlers signatures have changed! Previously, some Slate handlers had a signature of (e, state, editor) and others had a signature of (e, data, state, editor). Now all handlers will be passed a data object—which contains Slate-specific data related to the event—even if it is empty. This is helpful for future compatibility where we might need to add data to a handler that previously didn't have any, and is nicer for consistency. The onKeyDown handler's new data object contains the key name, code and a series of is* properties to make working with hotkeys easier. The onBeforeInput handler's new data object is empty.

The Utils export has been removed. Previously, a Key utility and the findDOMNode utility were exposed under the Utils object. The Key has been removed in favor of the data object passed to onKeyDown. And then findDOMNode utility has been upgraded to a top-level named export, so you'll now need to access it via import { findDOMNode } from 'slate'.

Void nodes now permanently have " " as content. Previously, they contained an empty string, but this isn't technically correct, since they have content and shouldn't be considered "empty". Now they will have a single space of content. This shouldn't really affect anyone, unless you happened to be accessing that string for serialization.

Empty inline nodes are now impossible. This is to stay consistent with native contenteditable behavior, where although technically the elements can exist, they have odd behavior and can never be selected.


0.7.0 — July 24, 2016

BREAKING

The Raw serializer is no longer terse by default! Previously, the Raw serializer would return a "terse" representation of the document, omitting information that wasn't strictly necessary to deserialize later, like the key of nodes. By default this no longer happens. You have to opt-in to the behavior by passing { terse: true } as the second options argument of the deserialize and serialize methods.


0.6.0 — July 22, 2016

BREAKING

Void components are no longer rendered implicity! Previously, Slate would automatically wrap any node with isVoid: true in a <Void> component. But doing this prevented you from customizing the wrapper, like adding a className or style property. So you must now render the wrapper yourself, and it has been exported as Slate.Void. This, combined with a small change to the <Void> component's structure allows the "selected" state of void nodes to be rendered purely with CSS based on the :focus property of a <Void> element, which previously had to be handled in JavaScript. This allows us to streamline selection-handling logic, improving performance and reducing complexity.

data-offset-key is now <key>-<index> instead of <key>:<start>-<end>. This shouldn't actually affect anyone, unless you were specifically relying on that attribute in the DOM. This change greatly reduces the number of re-renders needed, since previously any additional characters would cause a cascading change in the <start> and <end> offsets of latter text ranges.


0.5.0 — July 20, 2016

BREAKING

node.getTextNodes() is now node.getTexts(). This is just for consistency with the other existing Node methods like getBlocks(), getInlines(), etc. And it's nicely shorter. 😉

Node methods now throw earlier during unexpected states. This shouldn't break anything for most folks, unless a strange edge-case was going undetected previously.


0.4.0 — July 20, 2016

BREAKING

renderMark(mark, state, editor) is now renderMark(mark, marks, state, editor). This change allows you to render marks based on multiple marks presence at once on a given range of text, for example using a custom BoldItalic.otf font when text has both bold and italic marks.


0.3.0 — July 20, 2016

BREAKING

transform.unwrapBlock() now unwraps selectively. Previously, calling unwrapBlock with a range representing a middle sibling would unwrap all of the siblings, removing the wrapping block entirely. Now, calling it with those same arguments will only move the middle sibling up a layer in the hierarchy, preserving the nesting on any of its siblings. This changes makes it much simpler to implement functionality like unwrapping a single list item, which previously would unwrap the entire list.


0.2.0 — July 18, 2016

BREAKING

transform.mark() is now transform.addMark() and transform.unmark() is now transform.removeMark(). The new names make it clearer that the transforms are actions being performed, and it paves the way for adding a toggleMark convenience as well.


0.1.0 — July 13, 2016

🎉