Skip to content
Resources access for mobile (android & ios) Kotlin Multiplatform development
Kotlin
Branch: master
Clone or download
Latest commit dbbdb13 Feb 8, 2020
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
.github/workflows fix ui testing run with unpublished versions Jan 31, 2020
buildSrc up version Feb 8, 2020
gradle-plugin
gradle/wrapper initial commit Aug 28, 2019
img add logo Sep 17, 2019
resources #39 simplified Parcelable Feb 8, 2020
sample update testdata on ru language Jan 31, 2020
.gitignore initial commit Aug 28, 2019
CONTRIBUTING.md initial readme & contributing guide Sep 4, 2019
LICENSE.md initial commit Aug 28, 2019
README.md up version Feb 8, 2020
build.gradle.kts remove unecessary import Oct 14, 2019
gradle.properties
gradlew initial commit Aug 28, 2019
gradlew.bat initial commit Aug 28, 2019
settings.gradle.kts explicit gradle publish tasks Dec 10, 2019

README.md

moko-resources
GitHub license Download kotlin-version

Mobile Kotlin resources

This is a Kotlin MultiPlatform library that provides access to the resources on iOS & Android with the support of the default system localization.

Table of Contents

Features

  • Strings, Plurals, Images to access the corresponding resources from common code;
  • StringDesc for lifecycle-aware access to resources and unified localization on both platforms.

Requirements

  • Gradle version 5.4.1+
  • Android API 16+
  • iOS version 9.0+

Versions

  • kotlin 1.3.50
    • 0.1.0
    • 0.2.0
    • 0.3.0
    • 0.4.0
  • kotlin 1.3.60
    • 0.5.0
  • kotlin 1.3.61
    • 0.6.0
    • 0.6.1
    • 0.6.2
    • 0.7.0
    • 0.8.0

Installation

root build.gradle

buildscript {
    repositories {
        maven { url = "https://dl.bintray.com/icerockdev/plugins" }
    }

    dependencies {
        classpath "dev.icerock.moko:resources-generator:0.8.0"
    }
}


allprojects {
    repositories {
        maven { url = "https://dl.bintray.com/icerockdev/moko" }
    }
}

project build.gradle

apply plugin: "dev.icerock.mobile.multiplatform-resources"

dependencies {
    commonMainApi("dev.icerock.moko:resources:0.8.0")
}

multiplatformResources {
    multiplatformResourcesPackage = "org.example.library"
}

settings.gradle

enableFeaturePreview("GRADLE_METADATA")

ios-app Info.plist:

<key>CFBundleLocalizations</key>
<array>
    <string>en</string>
    <string>ru</string>
</array>

in array should be added all used languages.

Usage

Example 1 - simple localization string

The first step is a create a file strings.xml in commonMain/resources/MR/base with the following content:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<resources>
    <string name="my_string">My default localization string</string>
</resources>

Next - create a file strings.xml with localized strings in commonMain/resource/MR/<languageCode>. Here's an example of creating commonMain/resource/MR/ru for a Russian localization:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<resources>
    <string name="my_string">Моя строка локализации по умолчанию</string>
</resources>

After adding the resources we can call a gradle sync or execute a gradle task generateMRcommonMain. This will generate a MR class containing MR.strings.my_string, which we can use in commonMain:

fun getMyString(): StringDesc {
  return StringDesc.Resource(MR.strings.my_string)
}

After this we can use our functions on the platform side:
Android:

val string = getMyString().toString(context = this)

iOS:

let string = getMyString().localized()

Note: StringDesc is a multiple-source container for Strings: in StringDesc we can use a resource, plurals, formatted variants, or raw string. To convert StringDesc to String on Android call toString(context) (a context is required for the resources usage), on iOS - call localized().

Example 2 - formatted localization string

In commonMain/resources/MR/base/strings.xml add:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<resources>
    <string name="my_string_formatted">My format '%s'</string>
</resources>

Then add the localized values for other languages like in example #1. Now create the followin function in commonMain:

fun getMyFormatDesc(input: String): StringDesc {
  return StringDesc.ResourceFormatted(MR.strings.my_string_formatted, input)
}

Now add support on the platform side like in example #1:
Android:

val string = getMyFormatDesc("hello").toString(context = this)

iOS:

let string = getMyFormatDesc(input: "hello").localized()

Example 3 - plural string

The first step is to create a file plurals.xml in commonMain/resources/MR/base with the following content:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<resources>
    <plural name="my_plural">
        <item quantity="zero">zero</item>
        <item quantity="one">one</item>
        <item quantity="two">two</item>
        <item quantity="few">few</item>
        <item quantity="many">many</item>
        <item quantity="other">other</item>
    </plural>
</resources>

Then add the localized values for other languages like in example #1.
Next, create a function in commonMain:

fun getMyPluralDesc(quantity: Int): StringDesc {
  return StringDesc.Plural(MR.plurals.my_plural, quantity)
}

Now add support on the platform side like in example #1:
Android:

val string = getMyPluralDesc(10).toString(context = this)

iOS:

let string = getMyPluralDesc(quantity: 10).localized()

Example 4 - plural formatted string

The first step is to create file plurals.xml in commonMain/resources/MR/base with the following content:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<resources>
    <plural name="my_plural">
        <item quantity="zero">no items</item>
        <item quantity="one">%d item</item>
        <item quantity="two">%d items</item>
        <item quantity="few">%d items</item>
        <item quantity="many">%d items</item>
        <item quantity="other">%d items</item>
    </plural>
</resources>

Then add the localized values for other languages like in example #1.
Next, create a function in commonMain:

fun getMyPluralFormattedDesc(quantity: Int): StringDesc {
  // we pass quantity as selector for correct plural string and for pass quantity as argument for formatting
  return StringDesc.PluralFormatted(MR.plurals.my_plural, quantity, quantity)  
}

And like in example #1, add the platform-side support:
Android:

val string = getMyPluralFormattedDesc(10).toString(context = this)

iOS:

let string = getMyPluralFormattedDesc(quantity: 10).localized()

Example 5 - pass raw string or resource

If we already use some resources as a placeholder value, we can use StringDesc to change the string source:

fun getUserName(user: User?): StringDesc {
  if(user != null) {
    return StringDesc.Raw(user.name)
  } else {
    return StringDesc.Resource(MR.strings.name_placeholder)
  }  
}

And just like in example 1 usage on platform side:
Android:

val string1 = getUserName(user).toString(context = this) // we got name from User model
val string2 = getUserName(null).toString(context = this) // we got name_placeholder from resources

iOS:

let string1 = getUserName(user: user).localized() // we got name from User model
let string2 = getUserName(user: null).localized() // we got name_placeholder from resources

Example 6 - pass image

Image resources directory is commonMain/resources/MR/images with support of nested directories.
Image name should be end with one of:

  • @0.75x - android ldpi;
  • @1x - android mdpi, ios 1x;
  • @1.5x - android hdpi;
  • @2x - android xhdpi, ios 2x;
  • @3x - android xxhdpi, ios 3x;
  • @4x - android xxxhdpi. Supported png and jpg resources for now.

If we add to commonMain/resources/MR/images files:

  • home_black_18@1x.png
  • home_black_18@2x.png

We got autogenerated MR.images.home_black_18 ImageResource in code, that we can use:

  • Android: imageView.setImageResource(image.drawableResId)
  • iOS: imageView.image = image.toUIImage()

Example 7 - pass font

Fonts resources directory is commonMain/resources/MR/fonts.
Font name should be this pattern: <fontFamily>-<fontStyle> like:

  • Raleway-Bold.ttf
  • Raleway-Regular.ttf
  • Raleway-Italic.ttf Supported only ttf resources for now.

If we add to commonMain/resources/MR/fonts files:

  • Raleway-Bold.ttf
  • Raleway-Regular.ttf
  • Raleway-Italic.ttf

We got autogenerated MR.fonts.Raleway.italic, MR.fonts.Raleway.regular, MR.fonts.Raleway.bold FontResource in code, that we can use:

  • Android: textView.typeface = font.getTypeface(context = this)
  • iOS: textView.font = font.uiFont(withSize: 14.0)

Samples

Please see more examples in the sample directory.

Set Up Locally

  • The resources directory contains the resources library;
  • The gradle-plugin directory contains a gradle plugin with a MR class generator;
  • The sample directory contains sample apps for Android and iOS; plus the mpp-library connected to the apps;
  • For local testing a library use the :resources:publishToMavenLocal gradle task - so that sample apps use the locally published version.
  • For local testing a plugin use the :gradle-plugin:publishToMavenLocal gradle task so that sample apps will use the locally published version.

Contributing

All development (both new features and bug fixes) is performed in the develop branch. This way master always contains the sources of the most recently released version. Please send PRs with bug fixes to the develop branch. Documentation fixes in the markdown files are an exception to this rule. They are updated directly in master.

The develop branch is pushed to master on release.

For more details on contributing please see the contributing guide.

License

Copyright 2019 IceRock MAG Inc.

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

   http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.
You can’t perform that action at this time.