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/**
* Copyright (c) 2014-present, Facebook, Inc.
*
* This source code is licensed under the MIT license found in the
* LICENSE file in the root directory of this source tree.
*/
/**
* Immutable data encourages pure functions (data-in, data-out) and lends itself
* to much simpler application development and enabling techniques from
* functional programming such as lazy evaluation.
*
* While designed to bring these powerful functional concepts to JavaScript, it
* presents an Object-Oriented API familiar to Javascript engineers and closely
* mirroring that of Array, Map, and Set. It is easy and efficient to convert to
* and from plain Javascript types.
*
* ## How to read these docs
*
* In order to better explain what kinds of values the Immutable.js API expects
* and produces, this documentation is presented in a statically typed dialect of
* JavaScript (like [Flow][] or [TypeScript][]). You *don't need* to use these
* type checking tools in order to use Immutable.js, however becoming familiar
* with their syntax will help you get a deeper understanding of this API.
*
* **A few examples and how to read them.**
*
* All methods describe the kinds of data they accept and the kinds of data
* they return. For example a function which accepts two numbers and returns
* a number would look like this:
*
* ```js
* sum(first: number, second: number): number
* ```
*
* Sometimes, methods can accept different kinds of data or return different
* kinds of data, and this is described with a *type variable*, which is
* typically in all-caps. For example, a function which always returns the same
* kind of data it was provided would look like this:
*
* ```js
* identity<T>(value: T): T
* ```
*
* Type variables are defined with classes and referred to in methods. For
* example, a class that holds onto a value for you might look like this:
*
* ```js
* class Box<T> {
* constructor(value: T)
* getValue(): T
* }
* ```
*
* In order to manipulate Immutable data, methods that we're used to affecting
* a Collection instead return a new Collection of the same type. The type
* `this` refers to the same kind of class. For example, a List which returns
* new Lists when you `push` a value onto it might look like:
*
* ```js
* class List<T> {
* push(value: T): this
* }
* ```
*
* Many methods in Immutable.js accept values which implement the JavaScript
* [Iterable][] protocol, and might appear like `Iterable<string>` for something
* which represents sequence of strings. Typically in JavaScript we use plain
* Arrays (`[]`) when an Iterable is expected, but also all of the Immutable.js
* collections are iterable themselves!
*
* For example, to get a value deep within a structure of data, we might use
* `getIn` which expects an `Iterable` path:
*
* ```
* getIn(path: Iterable<string | number>): unknown
* ```
*
* To use this method, we could pass an array: `data.getIn([ "key", 2 ])`.
*
*
* Note: All examples are presented in the modern [ES2015][] version of
* JavaScript. Use tools like Babel to support older browsers.
*
* For example:
*
* ```js
* // ES2015
* const mappedFoo = foo.map(x => x * x);
* // ES5
* var mappedFoo = foo.map(function (x) { return x * x; });
* ```
*
* [ES2015]: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/New_in_JavaScript/ECMAScript_6_support_in_Mozilla
* [TypeScript]: http://www.typescriptlang.org/
* [Flow]: https://flowtype.org/
* [Iterable]: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Iteration_protocols
*/
declare module Immutable {
/**
* Lists are ordered indexed dense collections, much like a JavaScript
* Array.
*
* Lists are immutable and fully persistent with O(log32 N) gets and sets,
* and O(1) push and pop.
*
* Lists implement Deque, with efficient addition and removal from both the
* end (`push`, `pop`) and beginning (`unshift`, `shift`).
*
* Unlike a JavaScript Array, there is no distinction between an
* "unset" index and an index set to `undefined`. `List#forEach` visits all
* indices from 0 to size, regardless of whether they were explicitly defined.
*/
export module List {
/**
* True if the provided value is a List
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List } = require('immutable');
* List.isList([]); // false
* List.isList(List()); // true
* ```
*/
function isList(maybeList: unknown): maybeList is List<unknown>;
/**
* Creates a new List containing `values`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List } = require('immutable');
* List.of(1, 2, 3, 4)
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
* ```
*
* Note: Values are not altered or converted in any way.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List } = require('immutable');
* List.of({x:1}, 2, [3], 4)
* // List [ { x: 1 }, 2, [ 3 ], 4 ]
* ```
*/
function of<T>(...values: Array<T>): List<T>;
}
/**
* Create a new immutable List containing the values of the provided
* collection-like.
*
* Note: `List` is a factory function and not a class, and does not use the
* `new` keyword during construction.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List, Set } = require('immutable')
*
* const emptyList = List()
* // List []
*
* const plainArray = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
* const listFromPlainArray = List(plainArray)
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
*
* const plainSet = Set([ 1, 2, 3, 4 ])
* const listFromPlainSet = List(plainSet)
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
*
* const arrayIterator = plainArray[Symbol.iterator]()
* const listFromCollectionArray = List(arrayIterator)
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
*
* listFromPlainArray.equals(listFromCollectionArray) // true
* listFromPlainSet.equals(listFromCollectionArray) // true
* listFromPlainSet.equals(listFromPlainArray) // true
* ```
*/
export function List(): List<unknown>;
export function List<T>(): List<T>;
export function List<T>(collection: Iterable<T>): List<T>;
export interface List<T> extends Collection.Indexed<T> {
/**
* The number of items in this List.
*/
readonly size: number;
// Persistent changes
/**
* Returns a new List which includes `value` at `index`. If `index` already
* exists in this List, it will be replaced.
*
* `index` may be a negative number, which indexes back from the end of the
* List. `v.set(-1, "value")` sets the last item in the List.
*
* If `index` larger than `size`, the returned List's `size` will be large
* enough to include the `index`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const originalList = List([ 0 ]);
* // List [ 0 ]
* originalList.set(1, 1);
* // List [ 0, 1 ]
* originalList.set(0, 'overwritten');
* // List [ "overwritten" ]
* originalList.set(2, 2);
* // List [ 0, undefined, 2 ]
*
* List().set(50000, 'value').size;
* // 50001
* ```
*
* Note: `set` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
set(index: number, value: T): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List which excludes this `index` and with a size 1 less
* than this List. Values at indices above `index` are shifted down by 1 to
* fill the position.
*
* This is synonymous with `list.splice(index, 1)`.
*
* `index` may be a negative number, which indexes back from the end of the
* List. `v.delete(-1)` deletes the last item in the List.
*
* Note: `delete` cannot be safely used in IE8
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* List([ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]).delete(0);
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
* ```
*
* Since `delete()` re-indexes values, it produces a complete copy, which
* has `O(N)` complexity.
*
* Note: `delete` *cannot* be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @alias remove
*/
delete(index: number): List<T>;
remove(index: number): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List with `value` at `index` with a size 1 more than this
* List. Values at indices above `index` are shifted over by 1.
*
* This is synonymous with `list.splice(index, 0, value)`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* List([ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]).insert(6, 5)
* // List [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]
* ```
*
* Since `insert()` re-indexes values, it produces a complete copy, which
* has `O(N)` complexity.
*
* Note: `insert` *cannot* be used in `withMutations`.
*/
insert(index: number, value: T): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List with 0 size and no values in constant time.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* List([ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]).clear()
* // List []
* ```
*
* Note: `clear` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
clear(): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List with the provided `values` appended, starting at this
* List's `size`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* List([ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]).push(5)
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]
* ```
*
* Note: `push` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
push(...values: Array<T>): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List with a size ones less than this List, excluding
* the last index in this List.
*
* Note: this differs from `Array#pop` because it returns a new
* List rather than the removed value. Use `last()` to get the last value
* in this List.
*
* ```js
* List([ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]).pop()
* // List[ 1, 2, 3 ]
* ```
*
* Note: `pop` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
pop(): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List with the provided `values` prepended, shifting other
* values ahead to higher indices.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* List([ 2, 3, 4]).unshift(1);
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
* ```
*
* Note: `unshift` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
unshift(...values: Array<T>): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List with a size ones less than this List, excluding
* the first index in this List, shifting all other values to a lower index.
*
* Note: this differs from `Array#shift` because it returns a new
* List rather than the removed value. Use `first()` to get the first
* value in this List.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* List([ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ]).shift();
* // List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]
* ```
*
* Note: `shift` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
shift(): List<T>;
/**
* Returns a new List with an updated value at `index` with the return
* value of calling `updater` with the existing value, or `notSetValue` if
* `index` was not set. If called with a single argument, `updater` is
* called with the List itself.
*
* `index` may be a negative number, which indexes back from the end of the
* List. `v.update(-1)` updates the last item in the List.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const list = List([ 'a', 'b', 'c' ])
* const result = list.update(2, val => val.toUpperCase())
* // List [ "a", "b", "C" ]
* ```
*
* This can be very useful as a way to "chain" a normal function into a
* sequence of methods. RxJS calls this "let" and lodash calls it "thru".
*
* For example, to sum a List after mapping and filtering:
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* function sum(collection) {
* return collection.reduce((sum, x) => sum + x, 0)
* }
*
* List([ 1, 2, 3 ])
* .map(x => x + 1)
* .filter(x => x % 2 === 0)
* .update(sum)
* // 6
* ```
*
* Note: `update(index)` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @see `Map#update`
*/
update(index: number, notSetValue: T, updater: (value: T) => T): this;
update(index: number, updater: (value: T) => T): this;
update<R>(updater: (value: this) => R): R;
/**
* Returns a new List with size `size`. If `size` is less than this
* List's size, the new List will exclude values at the higher indices.
* If `size` is greater than this List's size, the new List will have
* undefined values for the newly available indices.
*
* When building a new List and the final size is known up front, `setSize`
* used in conjunction with `withMutations` may result in the more
* performant construction.
*/
setSize(size: number): List<T>;
// Deep persistent changes
/**
* Returns a new List having set `value` at this `keyPath`. If any keys in
* `keyPath` do not exist, a new immutable Map will be created at that key.
*
* Index numbers are used as keys to determine the path to follow in
* the List.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List } = require('immutable')
* const list = List([ 0, 1, 2, List([ 3, 4 ])])
* list.setIn([3, 0], 999);
* // List [ 0, 1, 2, List [ 999, 4 ] ]
* ```
*
* Plain JavaScript Object or Arrays may be nested within an Immutable.js
* Collection, and setIn() can update those values as well, treating them
* immutably by creating new copies of those values with the changes applied.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List } = require('immutable')
* const list = List([ 0, 1, 2, { plain: 'object' }])
* list.setIn([3, 'plain'], 'value');
* // List([ 0, 1, 2, { plain: 'value' }])
* ```
*
* Note: `setIn` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
setIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>, value: unknown): this;
/**
* Returns a new List having removed the value at this `keyPath`. If any
* keys in `keyPath` do not exist, no change will occur.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List } = require('immutable')
* const list = List([ 0, 1, 2, List([ 3, 4 ])])
* list.deleteIn([3, 0]);
* // List [ 0, 1, 2, List [ 4 ] ]
* ```
*
* Plain JavaScript Object or Arrays may be nested within an Immutable.js
* Collection, and removeIn() can update those values as well, treating them
* immutably by creating new copies of those values with the changes applied.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { List } = require('immutable')
* const list = List([ 0, 1, 2, { plain: 'object' }])
* list.removeIn([3, 'plain']);
* // List([ 0, 1, 2, {}])
* ```
*
* Note: `deleteIn` *cannot* be safely used in `withMutations`.
*
* @alias removeIn
*/
deleteIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>): this;
removeIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>): this;
/**
* Note: `updateIn` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @see `Map#updateIn`
*/
updateIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>, notSetValue: unknown, updater: (value: unknown) => unknown): this;
updateIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>, updater: (value: unknown) => unknown): this;
/**
* Note: `mergeIn` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @see `Map#mergeIn`
*/
mergeIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>, ...collections: Array<unknown>): this;
/**
* Note: `mergeDeepIn` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @see `Map#mergeDeepIn`
*/
mergeDeepIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>, ...collections: Array<unknown>): this;
// Transient changes
/**
* Note: Not all methods can be safely used on a mutable collection or within
* `withMutations`! Check the documentation for each method to see if it
* allows being used in `withMutations`.
*
* @see `Map#withMutations`
*/
withMutations(mutator: (mutable: this) => unknown): this;
/**
* An alternative API for withMutations()
*
* Note: Not all methods can be safely used on a mutable collection or within
* `withMutations`! Check the documentation for each method to see if it
* allows being used in `withMutations`.
*
* @see `Map#asMutable`
*/
asMutable(): this;
/**
* @see `Map#wasAltered`
*/
wasAltered(): boolean;
/**
* @see `Map#asImmutable`
*/
asImmutable(): this;
// Sequence algorithms
/**
* Returns a new List with other values or collections concatenated to this one.
*
* Note: `concat` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @alias merge
*/
concat<C>(...valuesOrCollections: Array<Iterable<C> | C>): List<T | C>;
merge<C>(...collections: Array<Iterable<C>>): List<T | C>;
/**
* Returns a new List with values passed through a
* `mapper` function.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* List([ 1, 2 ]).map(x => 10 * x)
* // List [ 10, 20 ]
* ```
*/
map<M>(
mapper: (value: T, key: number, iter: this) => M,
context?: unknown
): List<M>;
/**
* Flat-maps the List, returning a new List.
*
* Similar to `list.map(...).flatten(true)`.
*/
flatMap<M>(
mapper: (value: T, key: number, iter: this) => Iterable<M>,
context?: unknown
): List<M>;
/**
* Returns a new List with only the values for which the `predicate`
* function returns true.
*
* Note: `filter()` always returns a new instance, even if it results in
* not filtering out any values.
*/
filter<F extends T>(
predicate: (value: T, index: number, iter: this) => value is F,
context?: unknown
): List<F>;
filter(
predicate: (value: T, index: number, iter: this) => unknown,
context?: unknown
): this;
/**
* Returns a List "zipped" with the provided collection.
*
* Like `zipWith`, but using the default `zipper`: creating an `Array`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const a = List([ 1, 2, 3 ]);
* const b = List([ 4, 5, 6 ]);
* const c = a.zip(b); // List [ [ 1, 4 ], [ 2, 5 ], [ 3, 6 ] ]
* ```
*/
zip<U>(other: Collection<unknown, U>): List<[T,U]>;
zip<U,V>(other: Collection<unknown, U>, other2: Collection<unknown,V>): List<[T,U,V]>;
zip(...collections: Array<Collection<unknown, unknown>>): List<unknown>;
/**
* Returns a List "zipped" with the provided collections.
*
* Unlike `zip`, `zipAll` continues zipping until the longest collection is
* exhausted. Missing values from shorter collections are filled with `undefined`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const a = List([ 1, 2 ]);
* const b = List([ 3, 4, 5 ]);
* const c = a.zipAll(b); // List [ [ 1, 3 ], [ 2, 4 ], [ undefined, 5 ] ]
* ```
*
* Note: Since zipAll will return a collection as large as the largest
* input, some results may contain undefined values. TypeScript cannot
* account for these without cases (as of v2.5).
*/
zipAll<U>(other: Collection<unknown, U>): List<[T,U]>;
zipAll<U,V>(other: Collection<unknown, U>, other2: Collection<unknown,V>): List<[T,U,V]>;
zipAll(...collections: Array<Collection<unknown, unknown>>): List<unknown>;
/**
* Returns a List "zipped" with the provided collections by using a
* custom `zipper` function.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const a = List([ 1, 2, 3 ]);
* const b = List([ 4, 5, 6 ]);
* const c = a.zipWith((a, b) => a + b, b);
* // List [ 5, 7, 9 ]
* ```
*/
zipWith<U, Z>(
zipper: (value: T, otherValue: U) => Z,
otherCollection: Collection<unknown, U>
): List<Z>;
zipWith<U, V, Z>(
zipper: (value: T, otherValue: U, thirdValue: V) => Z,
otherCollection: Collection<unknown, U>,
thirdCollection: Collection<unknown, V>
): List<Z>;
zipWith<Z>(
zipper: (...any: Array<unknown>) => Z,
...collections: Array<Collection<unknown, unknown>>
): List<Z>;
}
/**
* Immutable Map is an unordered Collection.Keyed of (key, value) pairs with
* `O(log32 N)` gets and `O(log32 N)` persistent sets.
*
* Iteration order of a Map is undefined, however is stable. Multiple
* iterations of the same Map will iterate in the same order.
*
* Map's keys can be of any type, and use `Immutable.is` to determine key
* equality. This allows the use of any value (including NaN) as a key.
*
* Because `Immutable.is` returns equality based on value semantics, and
* Immutable collections are treated as values, any Immutable collection may
* be used as a key.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map, List } = require('immutable');
* Map().set(List([ 1 ]), 'listofone').get(List([ 1 ]));
* // 'listofone'
* ```
*
* Any JavaScript object may be used as a key, however strict identity is used
* to evaluate key equality. Two similar looking objects will represent two
* different keys.
*
* Implemented by a hash-array mapped trie.
*/
export module Map {
/**
* True if the provided value is a Map
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* Map.isMap({}) // false
* Map.isMap(Map()) // true
* ```
*/
function isMap(maybeMap: unknown): maybeMap is Map<unknown, unknown>;
/**
* Creates a new Map from alternating keys and values
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* Map.of(
* 'key', 'value',
* 'numerical value', 3,
* 0, 'numerical key'
* )
* // Map { 0: "numerical key", "key": "value", "numerical value": 3 }
* ```
*
* @deprecated Use Map([ [ 'k', 'v' ] ]) or Map({ k: 'v' })
*/
function of(...keyValues: Array<unknown>): Map<unknown, unknown>;
}
/**
* Creates a new Immutable Map.
*
* Created with the same key value pairs as the provided Collection.Keyed or
* JavaScript Object or expects a Collection of [K, V] tuple entries.
*
* Note: `Map` is a factory function and not a class, and does not use the
* `new` keyword during construction.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* Map({ key: "value" })
* Map([ [ "key", "value" ] ])
* ```
*
* Keep in mind, when using JS objects to construct Immutable Maps, that
* JavaScript Object properties are always strings, even if written in a
* quote-less shorthand, while Immutable Maps accept keys of any type.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { Map } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* let obj = { 1: "one" }
* Object.keys(obj) // [ "1" ]
* assert.equal(obj["1"], obj[1]) // "one" === "one"
*
* let map = Map(obj)
* assert.notEqual(map.get("1"), map.get(1)) // "one" !== undefined
* ```
*
* Property access for JavaScript Objects first converts the key to a string,
* but since Immutable Map keys can be of any type the argument to `get()` is
* not altered.
*/
export function Map<K, V>(collection: Iterable<[K, V]>): Map<K, V>;
export function Map<V>(obj: {[key: string]: V}): Map<string, V>;
export function Map<K, V>(): Map<K, V>;
export function Map(): Map<unknown, unknown>;
export interface Map<K, V> extends Collection.Keyed<K, V> {
/**
* The number of entries in this Map.
*/
readonly size: number;
// Persistent changes
/**
* Returns a new Map also containing the new key, value pair. If an equivalent
* key already exists in this Map, it will be replaced.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const originalMap = Map()
* const newerMap = originalMap.set('key', 'value')
* const newestMap = newerMap.set('key', 'newer value')
*
* originalMap
* // Map {}
* newerMap
* // Map { "key": "value" }
* newestMap
* // Map { "key": "newer value" }
* ```
*
* Note: `set` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
set(key: K, value: V): this;
/**
* Returns a new Map which excludes this `key`.
*
* Note: `delete` cannot be safely used in IE8, but is provided to mirror
* the ES6 collection API.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const originalMap = Map({
* key: 'value',
* otherKey: 'other value'
* })
* // Map { "key": "value", "otherKey": "other value" }
* originalMap.delete('otherKey')
* // Map { "key": "value" }
* ```
*
* Note: `delete` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @alias remove
*/
delete(key: K): this;
remove(key: K): this;
/**
* Returns a new Map which excludes the provided `keys`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const names = Map({ a: "Aaron", b: "Barry", c: "Connor" })
* names.deleteAll([ 'a', 'c' ])
* // Map { "b": "Barry" }
* ```
*
* Note: `deleteAll` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @alias removeAll
*/
deleteAll(keys: Iterable<K>): this;
removeAll(keys: Iterable<K>): this;
/**
* Returns a new Map containing no keys or values.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* Map({ key: 'value' }).clear()
* // Map {}
* ```
*
* Note: `clear` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
clear(): this;
/**
* Returns a new Map having updated the value at this `key` with the return
* value of calling `updater` with the existing value.
*
* Similar to: `map.set(key, updater(map.get(key)))`.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const aMap = Map({ key: 'value' })
* const newMap = aMap.update('key', value => value + value)
* // Map { "key": "valuevalue" }
* ```
*
* This is most commonly used to call methods on collections within a
* structure of data. For example, in order to `.push()` onto a nested `List`,
* `update` and `push` can be used together:
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { Map, List } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const aMap = Map({ nestedList: List([ 1, 2, 3 ]) })
* const newMap = aMap.update('nestedList', list => list.push(4))
* // Map { "nestedList": List [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ] }
* ```
*
* When a `notSetValue` is provided, it is provided to the `updater`
* function when the value at the key does not exist in the Map.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { Map } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const aMap = Map({ key: 'value' })
* const newMap = aMap.update('noKey', 'no value', value => value + value)
* // Map { "key": "value", "noKey": "no valueno value" }
* ```
*
* However, if the `updater` function returns the same value it was called
* with, then no change will occur. This is still true if `notSetValue`
* is provided.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { Map } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const aMap = Map({ apples: 10 })
* const newMap = aMap.update('oranges', 0, val => val)
* // Map { "apples": 10 }
* assert.strictEqual(newMap, map);
* ```
*
* For code using ES2015 or later, using `notSetValue` is discourged in
* favor of function parameter default values. This helps to avoid any
* potential confusion with identify functions as described above.
*
* The previous example behaves differently when written with default values:
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { Map } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const aMap = Map({ apples: 10 })
* const newMap = aMap.update('oranges', (val = 0) => val)
* // Map { "apples": 10, "oranges": 0 }
* ```
*
* If no key is provided, then the `updater` function return value is
* returned as well.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { Map } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* const aMap = Map({ key: 'value' })
* const result = aMap.update(aMap => aMap.get('key'))
* // "value"
* ```
*
* This can be very useful as a way to "chain" a normal function into a
* sequence of methods. RxJS calls this "let" and lodash calls it "thru".
*
* For example, to sum the values in a Map
*
* <!-- runkit:activate
* { "preamble": "const { Map } = require('immutable');" }
* -->
* ```js
* function sum(collection) {
* return collection.reduce((sum, x) => sum + x, 0)
* }
*
* Map({ x: 1, y: 2, z: 3 })
* .map(x => x + 1)
* .filter(x => x % 2 === 0)
* .update(sum)
* // 6
* ```
*
* Note: `update(key)` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
update(key: K, notSetValue: V, updater: (value: V) => V): this;
update(key: K, updater: (value: V) => V): this;
update<R>(updater: (value: this) => R): R;
/**
* Returns a new Map resulting from merging the provided Collections
* (or JS objects) into this Map. In other words, this takes each entry of
* each collection and sets it on this Map.
*
* Note: Values provided to `merge` are shallowly converted before being
* merged. No nested values are altered.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const one = Map({ a: 10, b: 20, c: 30 })
* const two = Map({ b: 40, a: 50, d: 60 })
* one.merge(two) // Map { "a": 50, "b": 40, "c": 30, "d": 60 }
* two.merge(one) // Map { "b": 20, "a": 10, "d": 60, "c": 30 }
* ```
*
* Note: `merge` can be used in `withMutations`.
*
* @alias concat
*/
merge<KC, VC>(...collections: Array<Iterable<[KC, VC]>>): Map<K | KC, V | VC>;
merge<C>(...collections: Array<{[key: string]: C}>): Map<K | string, V | C>;
concat<KC, VC>(...collections: Array<Iterable<[KC, VC]>>): Map<K | KC, V | VC>;
concat<C>(...collections: Array<{[key: string]: C}>): Map<K | string, V | C>;
/**
* Like `merge()`, `mergeWith()` returns a new Map resulting from merging
* the provided Collections (or JS objects) into this Map, but uses the
* `merger` function for dealing with conflicts.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const one = Map({ a: 10, b: 20, c: 30 })
* const two = Map({ b: 40, a: 50, d: 60 })
* one.mergeWith((oldVal, newVal) => oldVal / newVal, two)
* // { "a": 0.2, "b": 0.5, "c": 30, "d": 60 }
* two.mergeWith((oldVal, newVal) => oldVal / newVal, one)
* // { "b": 2, "a": 5, "d": 60, "c": 30 }
* ```
*
* Note: `mergeWith` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
mergeWith(
merger: (oldVal: V, newVal: V, key: K) => V,
...collections: Array<Iterable<[K, V]> | {[key: string]: V}>
): this;
/**
* Like `merge()`, but when two Collections conflict, it merges them as well,
* recursing deeply through the nested data.
*
* Note: Values provided to `merge` are shallowly converted before being
* merged. No nested values are altered unless they will also be merged at
* a deeper level.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const one = Map({ a: Map({ x: 10, y: 10 }), b: Map({ x: 20, y: 50 }) })
* const two = Map({ a: Map({ x: 2 }), b: Map({ y: 5 }), c: Map({ z: 3 }) })
* one.mergeDeep(two)
* // Map {
* // "a": Map { "x": 2, "y": 10 },
* // "b": Map { "x": 20, "y": 5 },
* // "c": Map { "z": 3 }
* // }
* ```
*
* Note: `mergeDeep` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
mergeDeep(...collections: Array<Iterable<[K, V]> | {[key: string]: V}>): this;
/**
* Like `mergeDeep()`, but when two non-Collections conflict, it uses the
* `merger` function to determine the resulting value.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const one = Map({ a: Map({ x: 10, y: 10 }), b: Map({ x: 20, y: 50 }) })
* const two = Map({ a: Map({ x: 2 }), b: Map({ y: 5 }), c: Map({ z: 3 }) })
* one.mergeDeepWith((oldVal, newVal) => oldVal / newVal, two)
* // Map {
* // "a": Map { "x": 5, "y": 10 },
* // "b": Map { "x": 20, "y": 10 },
* // "c": Map { "z": 3 }
* // }
* ```
* Note: `mergeDeepWith` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
mergeDeepWith(
merger: (oldVal: unknown, newVal: unknown, key: unknown) => unknown,
...collections: Array<Iterable<[K, V]> | {[key: string]: V}>
): this;
// Deep persistent changes
/**
* Returns a new Map having set `value` at this `keyPath`. If any keys in
* `keyPath` do not exist, a new immutable Map will be created at that key.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const originalMap = Map({
* subObject: Map({
* subKey: 'subvalue',
* subSubObject: Map({
* subSubKey: 'subSubValue'
* })
* })
* })
*
* const newMap = originalMap.setIn(['subObject', 'subKey'], 'ha ha!')
* // Map {
* // "subObject": Map {
* // "subKey": "ha ha!",
* // "subSubObject": Map { "subSubKey": "subSubValue" }
* // }
* // }
*
* const newerMap = originalMap.setIn(
* ['subObject', 'subSubObject', 'subSubKey'],
* 'ha ha ha!'
* )
* // Map {
* // "subObject": Map {
* // "subKey": "subvalue",
* // "subSubObject": Map { "subSubKey": "ha ha ha!" }
* // }
* // }
* ```
*
* Plain JavaScript Object or Arrays may be nested within an Immutable.js
* Collection, and setIn() can update those values as well, treating them
* immutably by creating new copies of those values with the changes applied.
*
* <!-- runkit:activate -->
* ```js
* const { Map } = require('immutable')
* const originalMap = Map({
* subObject: {
* subKey: 'subvalue',
* subSubObject: {
* subSubKey: 'subSubValue'
* }
* }
* })
*
* originalMap.setIn(['subObject', 'subKey'], 'ha ha!')
* // Map {
* // "subObject": {
* // subKey: "ha ha!",
* // subSubObject: { subSubKey: "subSubValue" }
* // }
* // }
* ```
*
* If any key in the path exists but cannot be updated (such as a primitive
* like number or a custom Object like Date), an error will be thrown.
*
* Note: `setIn` can be used in `withMutations`.
*/
setIn(keyPath: Iterable<unknown>, value: unknown): this;
/**
* Returns a new Map having removed the value at this `keyPath`. If any keys
* in `keyPath` do not exist, no change will occur.
*
* Note: `deleteIn` can be used in `withMutations`.
*