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Devin Walker edited this page Sep 28, 2018 · 6 revisions

WP Rollback Documentation

Welcome to the WP-Rollback wiki!

The WP Rollback Wiki is intended to provide a basic walkthrough of how to use the plugin for end users. This is not a technical manual, though in the future there might be documentation on how premium plugin/theme authors can also take advantage of WP Rollback.

Wiki Table of Contents

  1. Rolling Back Plugins
  2. Rolling Back Themes
  3. FAQ

WP Rollback's Purpose

WPRollback is intended to help WordPress users have a simple way to manage the versions of their plugins and themes. Many users express frustration at not being able to easily revert back to a previous version of a plugin or theme when they find that the update creates problems for them for one reason or another.

Life WITHOUT WP Rollback

Users are expected to either:

  1. Restore a whole backup of their site if they experience a problem with an update. While this works, it is far less than optimal.
  2. Learn how to find the correct previous version on the WordPress repository, download the zip file, and learn how to use FTP to replace the plugin or theme with the older version.
  3. Or just cry help and hope that someone, somewhere hears them.

But life WITH WP Rollback

Now if a plugin or theme creates unforeseen issues, you can simply choose the previous version from a list, hit confirm and you're back to the comfy comforts of the previous version.

What WPRB is NOT Intended to Do

You should not use WP Rollback on a live site without first having tested the rollback locally, or on a staging environment. It is very likely that if you roll back to a previous version that is not supported by your version of WordPress that you WILL have problems.

Please do not rollback anything on your live site without first testing it locally or on a staging environment. We really can't say this enough

A Note About Security Releases

You should also keep in mind that many plugins and themes push security updates out and that running an older version can make your site vulnerable. Typically, if you see a plugin that has a third decimal point, that is often considered a security update. For example, a version number of 1.0 is a stable version. But 1.0.1 would be a security update. So if you need to rollback from 1.2, we would suggest you rollback to 1.0.1 and NOT 1.0. Also keep in mind that this is a versioning convention, but it is not mandated by the WordPress.org Repository and plugin and theme authors can version their code with any convention they like.

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