ACTIVE (stable, use ES6 classes instead) - The ObjectZone lib contains a Class implementation for ES5 javascript applications to ease object-oriented programming in javascript.
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README.md

Ozone - Javascript Class Framework

Build Status

The Ozone class framework contains enhanced class support to ease the development of object-oriented javascript applications in an ES5 environment. Another alternative to get a better class support to use ES6 classes and compilers like Babel, Traceur or TypeScript until native ES6 support arrives.

Documentation

Installation

npm install o3
bower install o3

Environment compatibility

The framework succeeded the tests on

  • node v4.2 and v5.x
  • chrome 51.0
  • firefox 47.0 and 48.0
  • internet explorer 11.0
  • phantomjs 2.1

by the usage of npm scripts under win7 x64.

I wasn't able to test the framework by Opera since the Karma launcher is buggy, so I decided not to support Opera.

I used Yadda to write BDD tests. I used Karma with Browserify to test the framework in browsers.

On pre-ES5 environments there will be bugs in the Class module due to pre-ES5 enumeration and the lack of some ES5 methods, so pre-ES5 environments are not supported.

Requirements

An ES5 capable environment is required with

  • Object.create
  • ES5 compatible property enumeration: Object.defineProperty, Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor, Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty, etc.
  • Array.prototype.forEach

Usage

In this documentation I used the framework as follows:

var o3 = require("o3"),
    Class = o3.Class;

Inheritance

Inheriting from native classes (from the Error class in these examples)

You can extend native classes by calling the Class() function.

var UserError = Class(Error, {
    prototype: {
        message: "blah",
        constructor: function UserError() {
            Error.captureStackTrace(this, this.constructor);
        }
    }
}); 

An alternative to call Class.extend() with the Ancestor as the context. The Class() function uses this in the background.

var UserError = Class.extend.call(Error, {
    prototype: {
        message: "blah",
        constructor: function UserError() {
            Error.captureStackTrace(this, this.constructor);
        }
    }
});

Inheriting from custom classes

You can use Class.extend() by any other class, not just by native classes.

var Ancestor = Class(Object, {
    prototype: {
        a: 1,
        b: 2
    }
});

var Descendant = Class.extend.call(Ancestor, {
    prototype: {
        c: 3
    }
});

Or you can simply add it as a static method, so you don't have to pass context any time you want to use it. The only drawback, that this static method will be inherited as well.

var Ancestor = Class(Object, {
    extend: Class.extend,
    prototype: {
        a: 1,
        b: 2
    }
});

var Descendant = Ancestor.extend({
    prototype: {
        c: 3
    }
});

Inheriting from the Class class

You can inherit the extend() method and other utility methods from the Class class. Probably this is the simplest solution if you need the Class API and you don't need to inherit from special native classes like Error.

var Ancestor = Class.extend({
    prototype: {
        a: 1,
        b: 2
    }
});

var Descendant = Ancestor.extend({
    prototype: {
        c: 3
    }
});

Inheritance with clone and merge

The static extend() method uses the clone() and merge() utility methods to inherit from the ancestor and add properties from the config.

var MyClass = Class.clone.call(Object, function MyClass(){
    // ...
});
Class.merge.call(MyClass, {
    prototype: {
        x: 1, 
        y: 2
    }
});

Or with utility methods.

var MyClass = Class.clone(function MyClass() {
    // ...
}).merge({
    prototype: {
        x: 1,
        y: 2
    }
});

Inheritance with clone and absorb

You can fill in missing properties with the usage of absorb.

var MyClass = Class(SomeAncestor, {...});
Class.absorb.call(MyClass, Class);
MyClass.merge({...});

For example if you don't have Class methods and your class already has an ancestor, then you can use absorb() to add Class methods.

Abstract classes

Using abstract classes with instantiation verification won't be implemented in this lib, however we provide an abstractMethod, which you can put to not implemented parts of your abstract class.

var AbstractA = Class({
    prototype: {
        doA: function (){
            // ...
            var b = this.getB();
            // ...
            // do something with b
            // ...
        },
        getB: abstractMethod
    }
});

var AB1 = Class(AbstractA, {
    prototype: {
        getB: function (){
            return new B1();
        }
    }
});

var ab1 = new AB1();

I strongly support the composition over inheritance principle and I think you should use dependency injection instead of abstract classes.

var A = Class({
    prototype: {
        init: function (b){
            this.b = b;
        },
        doA: function (){
            // ...
            // do something with this.b
            // ...
        }
    }
});

var b = new B1();
var ab1 = new A(b);

Constructors

Using a custom constructor

You can pass your custom constructor as a config option by creating the class.

var MyClass = Class(Object, {
    prototype: {
        constructor: function () {
            // ...
        }
    }
});

Using a custom factory to create the constructor

Or you can pass a static factory method to create your custom constructor.

var MyClass = Class(Object, {
    factory: function () {
        return function () {
            // ...
        }
    }
});

Using an inherited factory to create the constructor

By inheritance the constructors of the descendant classes will be automatically created as well.

var Ancestor = Class(Object, {
    factory: function () {
        return function () {
            // ...
        }
    }
});
var Descendant = Class(Ancestor, {});

Using the default factory to create the constructor

You don't need to pass anything if you need a noop function as constructor. The Class.factory() will create a noop constructor by default.

var MyClass = Class(Object, {});

In fact you don't need to pass any arguments to the Class function if you need an empty class inheriting from the Object native class.

var MyClass = Class();

The default factory calls the build() and init() methods if they are given.

var MyClass = Class({
    prototype: {
        build: function (options) {
            console.log("build", options);
        },
        init: function (options) {
            console.log("init", options);
        }
    }
});

var my = new MyClass({a: 1, b: 2});
    // build {a: 1, b: 2}
    // init {a: 1, b: 2}

var my2 = my.clone({c: 3});
    // build {c: 3}

var MyClass2 = MyClass.extend({}, [{d: 4}]);
    // build {d: 4}

Instantiation

Creating new instance with the new operator

Ofc. you can create a new instance in the javascript way.

var MyClass = Class();
var my = new MyClass();

Creating a new instance with the static newInstance method

If you want to pass an array of arguments then you can do it the following way.

var MyClass = Class.extend({
    prototype: {
        constructor: function () {
            for (var i in arguments)
                console.log(arguments[i]);
        }
    }
});

var my = MyClass.newInstance.apply(MyClass, ["a", "b", "c"]);
    // a
    // b
    // c

Creating new instance with clone

You can create a new instance by cloning the prototype of the class.

var MyClass = Class();
var my = Class.prototype.clone.call(MyClass.prototype);

Or you can inherit the utility methods to make this easier.

var MyClass = Class.extend();
var my = MyClass.prototype.clone();

Just be aware that by default cloning calls only the build() method, so the init() method won't be called by the new instance.

Cloning instances

You can clone an existing instance with the clone method.

var MyClass = Class.extend();
var my = MyClass.prototype.clone();
var my2 = my.clone();

Be aware that this is prototypal inheritance with Object.create(), so the inherited properties won't be enumerable.

The clone() method calls the build() method on the new instance if it is given.

Using clone in the constructor

You can use the same behavior both by cloning and by creating a new instance using the constructor

var MyClass = Class.extend({
    lastIndex: 0,
    prototype: {
        index: undefined,
        constructor: function MyClass() {
            return MyClass.prototype.clone();
        },
        clone: function () {
            var instance = Class.prototype.clone.call(this);
            instance.index = ++MyClass.lastIndex;
            return instance;
        }
    }
});

var my1 = new MyClass();
var my2 = MyClass.prototype.clone();
var my3 = my1.clone();
var my4 = my2.clone();

Be aware that this way the constructor will drop the instance created with the new operator.

Be aware that the clone() method is used by inheritance, so creating the prototype of a descendant class will use the clone() method as well.

var Descendant = MyClass.clone(function Descendant() {
    return Descendant.prototype.clone();
});

var my5 = Descendant.prototype;
var my6 = new Descendant();
// ...

Using absorb(), merge() or inheritance to set the defaults values on properties

You can use absorb() to set default values after configuration.

var MyClass = Class.extend({
    prototype: {
        constructor: function (config) {
            var theDefaults = {
                // ...
            };
            this.merge(config);
            this.absorb(theDefaults);
        }
    }
});

You can use merge() to set default values before configuration.

var MyClass = Class.extend({
    prototype: {
        constructor: function (config) {
            var theDefaults = {
                // ...
            };
            this.merge(theDefaults);
            this.merge(config);
        }
    }
});

You can use inheritance to set default values on class level.

var MyClass = Class.extend({
    prototype: {
        aProperty: defaultValue,
        // ...
        constructor: function (config) {
            this.merge(config);
        }
    }
});

License

MIT - 2015 Jánszky László Lajos