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+Why Privacy Matters
+===================
+
+Privacy is a fundamental human right. It is recognized in many countries to be as central to individual human dignity and social values as Freedom of Association and Freedom of Speech. Simply put, privacy is the border where we draw a line between how far a society can intrude into our personal lives.
+
+Countries differ in how they define privacy. In the UK for example, privacy laws can be traced back to the 1300s when the English monarchy created laws protecting people from eavesdroppers and peeping toms. These regulations referred to the intrusion of a person’s comfort and not even the King of England could enter into a poor persons house without their permission. From this perspective, privacy is defined in terms of personal space and private property. In 1880 American lawyers, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis described privacy as the 'right to be left alone'. In this case, privacy is synonymous with notions of solitude and the right for a private life. In 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights specifically protected territorial and communications privacy which by that became part of constitutions worldwide. The European Commission on Human Rights and the European Court of Human Rights also noted in 1978 that privacy encompasses the right to establish relationships with others and develop emotional well-being.
+
+Today, a further facet of privacy increasingly perceived is the personal data we provide to organizations, online as well as offline. How our personal data is used and accessed drives the debate about the laws that govern our behavior and society. This in turn has knock-on effects on the public services we access and how businesses interact with us. It even has effects on how we define ourselves. If privacy is about the borders which govern who we give permission to watch us and track aspects of our lives, then the amount and type of personal information gathered, disseminated and processed is paramount to our basic civil liberties.
+
+An often heard argument, when questions of privacy and anonymity come up, goes along the lines of, "I only do boring stuff. Nobody will be interested in it anyway" or, "I have nothing to hide". Both of these statements are easily defeated.
+
+Firstly, a lot of companies are very interested in what boring things you do precisely so they have opportunity to offer "excellent" products fitting interests. In this way their advertising becomes much more efficient - they are able to tailor specifically to assumed needs and desires. Secondly you do have lots to hide. Maybe you do not express it in explicitly stated messages to friends and colleagues, but your browsing - if not protected by the techniques laid out in this book - will tell a lot about things you might rather keep secret: the ex-partner you search for using Google, illnesses you research or movies you watch are just few examples.
+
+Another consideration is that just because you might not have something to hide at this moment, you may very well in future. Putting together all the tools and skills to protect yourself from surveillance takes practice, trust and a bit of effort. These are things you might not be able to achieve and configure right when you need them most and need not take the form of a spy movie. An obsessed, persistent stalker, for example, is enough to heavily disrupt your life. The more you follow the suggestions given in this book, the less impact attacks like this will have on you. Companies may also stalk you too, finding more and more ways to reach into your daily life as the reach of computer networking itself deepens.
+
+Finally, a lack of anonymity and privacy does not just affect you, but all the people around you. If a third party, like your Internet Service Provider, reads your email, it is also violating the privacy of all the people in your address book. This problem starts to look even more dramatic when you look at the issues of social networking websites like Facebook. It is increasingly common to see photos uploaded and tagged without the knowledge or permission of the people affected.
+
+While we encourage you to be active politically to maintain your right to privacy, we wrote this book in order to empower people who feel that maintaining privacy on the Internet is also a personal responsibility. We hope these chapters will help you reach a point where you can feel that you have some control over how much other people know about you. Each of us has the right to a private life, a right to explore, browse and communicate with others as one wishes, without living in fear of prying eyes.
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+About This Book
+===============
+
+The CryptoParty Handbook was born from a suggestion by Marta Peirano ([http://petitemedia.es](http://petitemedia.es)) and Adam Hyde ([http://booksprints.net](http://booksprints.net)) after the first Berlin CryptoParty, held on the 29th of August, 2012. Julian Oliver ([http://julianoliver.com](http://julianoliver.com)) and Danja Vasiliev ([http://k0a1a.net](http://k0a1a.net)), co-organisers of the Berlin CryptoParty along with Marta were very enthusiastic about the idea, seeing a need for a practical working book with a low entry-barrier to use in subsequent parties. Asher Wolf, originator of the Crypto Party movement, was then invited to run along and the project was born.
+
+This book was written in the first 3 days of October 2012 at Studio Weise7, Berlin, surrounded by fine food and a small ocean of coffee. Approximately 20 people were involved in its creation, some more than others, some local and some far.
+
+The writing methodology used, BookSprint ([http://booksprints.net](http://booksprints.net)), is all about minimising any obstruction between expertise and the published page. Face-to-face discussion and dynamic task-assignment were a huge part of getting the job done, like any good CryptoParty!
+
+The open source, web-based (HTML5 and CSS) writing platform BookType ([http://booktype.pro](http://booktype.pro)) was chosen for the editing task, helping such a tentacular feat of parallel development to happen with relative ease. Asher also opened a couple of TitanPad pages to crowd-source the Manifesto and HowTo CryptoParty chapters.
+
+Combined, this became the official CryptoParty Handbook by midnight October the 3rd, GMT+1.
+
+The Book Sprint was 3 days in length and the full list of onsite participants included:
+
+Adam Hyde (facilitator), Marta Peirano, Julian Oliver, Danja Vasiliev, Asher Wolf ([http://cryptoparty.org](http://cryptoparty.org)), Jan Gerber, Malte Dik, Brian Newbold, Brendan Howell ([http://wintermute.org](http://wintermute.org), AT, Carola Hesse, Chris Pinchen ([http://chokepointproject.net/](http://chokepointproject.net)). Cover art (illustrations to come) by Emile Denichaud ([http://about.me/denichaud](http://about.me/denichaud))
+
+Help us improve this book
+
+If you see areas that need improvement or simply come across a typo, create a BookType account and start editing!
+
+[http://marta.booktype.pro/cryptonomaton/_edit/](http://marta.booktype.pro/cryptonomaton/_edit/)
+
+CryptoParty HandBook Credits
+
+Facilitated by:
+
+ * Adam Hyde
+
+Core Team:
+
+ * Marta Peirano
+ * Asher Wolf
+ * Julian Oliver
+ * Danja Vasiliev
+ * Malte Dik
+ * Jan Gerber
+ * Brian Newbold
+ * Brendan Howell
+
+Assisted by:
+
+ * Teresa Dillon
+ * AT
+ * Carola Hesse
+ * Chris Pinchen
+ * 'LiamO'
+ * 'l3lackEyedAngels'
+ * 'Story89'
+ * Travis Tueffel
+
+Cover Image by Emile Denichaud.
+
+Other material included:
+
+ * [https://www.flossmanuals.net/bypassing-censorship](https://www.flossmanuals.net/bypassing-censorship)
+
+The manuals used in the second half of this book borrow from 2 books sprinted by FLOSS Manuals:
+
+ * "How to Bypass Internet Censorship" 2008 & 2010 Adam Hyde (Facilitator), Alice Miller, Edward Cherlin, Freerk Ohling, Janet Swisher, Niels Elgaard Larsen, Sam Tennyson, Seth Schoen, Tomas Krag, Tom Boyle, Nart Villeneuve, Ronald Deibert, Zorrino Zorrinno, Austin Martin, Ben Weissmann, Ariel Viera, Niels Elgaard Larsen, Steven Murdoch, Ross Anderson, helen varley jamieson, Roberto Rastapopoulos, Karen Reilly, Erinn Clark, Samuel L. Tennyson, A Ravi
+
+ * "Basic Internet Security" 2011 Adam Hyde (Facilitator), Jan Gerber, Dan Hassan, Erik Stein, Sacha van Geffen, Mart van Santen, Lonneke van der Velden, Emile den Tex and Douwe Schmidt
+
+All chapters © the contributors unless otherwise noted below.
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