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README.md

Object Hooks Remover

Package to remove WordPress hook callbacks that uses object methods or closures.


Build Status


Minimum Requirements and Dependencies

Object Hooks Remover is a Composer package, installable via the package name inpsyde/object-hooks-remover.

It has no userland dependencies, it just requires PHP 7+.

When installed for development, via Composer, Object Hooks Remover also requires:

  • phpunit/phpunit (BSD-3-Clause)

Intro (or "What is this?")

WordPress plugin API has a partly incomplete implementation.

add_action and add_filter accepts as "callback" any kind PHP callable:

  • named functions
  • static object methods
  • dynamic object methods
  • anonymous functions
  • invokable objects

the functions to remove hooks, remove_action and remove_filter, only works with named functions and static object methods (2 of the 5 types of callbacks).

Well, ok, this is not completely true. remove_action and remove_filter can also be used to remove hooks with object methods or closures when the exact instance used to add the hook is available, but many and many times that's not the case.

This package provides 5 functions that can be used to remove hooks which uses object methods or closures even without having access to the instances of the objects used.

The package functions are:

  • Inpsyde\remove_object_hook
  • Inpsyde\remove_closure_hook
  • Inpsyde\remove_class_hook
  • Inpsyde\remove_instance_hook
  • Inpsyde\remove_invokable_hook

You might notice that there's no difference between action and filters because, expecially in removing, there's absolutely no difference between the two. In fact, this is the code that WordPress core for remove_action:

function remove_action( $tag, $function_to_remove, $priority = 10 ) {
	return remove_filter( $tag, $function_to_remove, $priority );
}

Inpsyde\remove_object_hook

The signature of this function is the following:

function remove_object_hook(
	string $hook,
	string $class_name,
	string $method_name = null,
	int $priority = null,
	bool $remove_static_callbacks = false
): int

This function is used to remove hook callbacks that use object methods. By default only targets dynamic methods, but can be used for static methods as well.

The first mandatory param is the "tag" we want to remove the callback from.

The second mandatory param is the object class name.

The third optional param is the method name. If not provided (or null), it means "all the methods".

The fourth optional param is priority. Unlike WordPress remove_action/remove_filter not providing a priority means "all the priorities".

The fifth optional param is a boolean that defaults to false. When true the function will remove both static and dynamic methods.

The return value of this and all the other function of the package is the number of callbacks removed.

Example:

// Somewhere...
class Foo {

	public function __construct() {
		add_action( 'init', [ $this, 'init' ], 99 );
	}
	
	public function init() {
		// some code here...
	}
}

new Foo();

// Somewhere **else**...
remove_object_hook( 'init', Foo::class, 'init' );

Inpsyde\remove_closure_hook

This function targets hook callbacks added using anonymous functions (aka closures).

Closures are the most tricky callbacks to remove, because it is hard to distinguish them.

In facts, in PHP, all closures are instances of the same class, Closure, and not having a method name there's very little left to distinguish one closure from another.

This function uses two ways to distinguish closures:

  • the object the closure is bound to,
  • the closure signature.

About closures bound object

Closures can be bound to an object, that means that inside the closure block $this refers to the bound object.

When a closure is created inside a class dynamic method, the object binding is automatic: inside the closure, $this refers to the instance where the closure is created.

When a closure is created inside a static method or outside of any class, inside the closure, $this is not defined at all (i.e. the closure is not bound).

It worth nothing that:

  • Closure can be "bound" to any object after they are created (see docs for Closure::bind and Closure::bindTo). So even closures created outside any class or inside class static methods might have a bound object.
  • Closures can be created as "static". Static closures are never bound, so don't have access to any $this, and can't be bound to any object after creation. Any attempt to bind a static closure will fail and result in a warning.

Function Signature

Inpsyde\remove_closure_hook signature is:

function remove_closure_hook(
	string $hook,
	$target_this = null,
	array $target_args = null,
	int $priority = null
): int 

The second optional param, $target_this, can be used to identify the $this of the closure that need to be removed.

It can be:

  • null, which means "all of them", i.e. the function will not take into account the object bound to closure to see if the closure should be removed or not.
  • false, the function will only remove static closures or closure with no bound object.
  • a string containing a class name, the function will only remove closures having a bound object of the given class.
  • an object instance, the function will only remove closures bound to given object.

The third optional param, $target_args is an array that can be used to distinguish closures by their parameters.

For example, a closure like this:

$closure = function (string $foo, int $bar, $baz ) { /*... */ };

can be targeted just by parameter names, passing an array like:

[ '$foo', '$bar', '$baz' ]

or by parameter names and types, passing an array like:

[ '$foo' => 'string', '$bar' => 'int', '$baz' => null ]

The two styles can't be mixed, if the type declaration is used for one param must be used for all of them. In case any of the parameters has no type declaration, null has to be used as shown above. When the param type is an object, the fully qualified name must be used.

It is also possible to pass null as third argument (or don't pass anything, which is the same because the param defaults to null), and in that case closures to be removed will be only distinguished by the bound $this.

In the case both second and third arguments are null, which is the default, all closures added to given hook are removed (only optionally filtered by priority).

By the means of bound $this, signature, and priority, it is possible to very effectively distinguish closures to remove. In facts, the only possibility that two closures can't be distinguished one from the other is that they both are added to the same hook, at the same priority, from the same class and they have the same signature...

Usage example

// Somewhere in a plugin...
class Foo {

	public __construct() {
		add_filter( 'the_title', function( $title ) { /* ... */ } );
		add_filter( 'the_content', function( string $content ) { /* ... */ } );
	}

}

new Foo();


// Somewhere *else*...
remove_closure_hook( 'the_title', Foo::class, [ '$title' ] );
remove_closure_hook( 'the_content', Foo::class, [ '$content' => 'string' ], 10 );

Inpsyde\remove_class_hook

Similar to remove_object_hook this function targets only static methods.

The signature is:

function remove_class_hook(
	string $hook,
	string $class_name,
	string $method_name = null,
	int $priority = null
): int

Example:

// Somewhere...
class Foo {

	public static function instance() {
		add_action( 'init', [ __CLASS__, 'init' ], 99 );
	}

	public static function init() {
		// some code here...
	}
}

Foo::instance();


// Somewhere **else**...
remove_class_hook( 'init', Foo::class, 'init' );

Even if static class methods could be removed via remove_action / remove_filter, this function can be still useful because can remove callbacks from any priority and even without specifying a method name. For example:

remove_class_hook( 'init', Foo::class );

can be used to remove all the static methods of Foo class that are added to init hook.


Inpsyde\remove_instance_hook

This function can be used to remove hook callbacks added with a specific object instance.

When having access to the exact instance used to add some hooks, it would be possible to remove those hooks via core functions remove_action / remove_filter, but this function can still be useful because in a single call can remove all the hooks that use the instance, no matter the method or the priority used.

remove_instance_hook signature is:

remove_instance_hook( 
	string $hook,
	$object_instance,
	int $priority = null
) : int;

Example:

// Somewhere...
class Foo {

	public __construct() {
		add_filter( 'the_title', [ $this, 'the_title_early', 1 ] );
		add_filter( 'the_title', [ $this, 'the_title_late', 9999 ] );
		add_filter( 'the_content', [ $this, 'the_content' ] );
	}

}

global $foo;
$foo = new Foo();


// Somewhere **else**...
global $foo;
remove_instance_hook( 'the_title', $foo ); // remove 2 callbacks
remove_instance_hook( 'the_content', $foo );

Inpsyde\remove_invokable_hook

This function targets hooks that were added with invokable objects.

The signature:

function remove_invokable_hook(
	string $hook,
	string $class_name,
	int $priority = null
) : int;

Example:

// Somewhere...
class Foo {

	public __construct() {
		add_filter( 'template_redirect', $this );
	}
    
	public __invoke() {
		/* some code here */
	}

}

new Foo();


// Somewhere **else**...
remove_invokable_hook( 'template_redirect', Foo::class );

Note that this function is no more than a shortcut for using Inpsyde\remove_object_hook passing __invoke as method name param.


License and Copyright

Copyright (c) 2017 Inpsyde GmbH.

Object Hooks Remover code is licensed under MIT license.

The team at Inpsyde is engineering the Web since 2006.

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