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Demonstrations of tcplife, the Linux BPF/bcc version.
tcplife summarizes TCP sessions that open and close while tracing. For example:
# ./tcplife
PID COMM LADDR LPORT RADDR RPORT TX_KB RX_KB MS
22597 recordProg 127.0.0.1 46644 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.23
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 46644 0 0 0.28
22598 curl 100.66.3.172 61620 52.205.89.26 80 0 1 91.79
22604 curl 100.66.3.172 44400 52.204.43.121 80 0 1 121.38
22624 recordProg 127.0.0.1 46648 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.22
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 46648 0 0 0.27
22647 recordProg 127.0.0.1 46650 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.21
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 46650 0 0 0.26
[...]
This caught a program, "recordProg" making a few short-lived TCP connections
to "redis-serv", lasting about 0.25 milliseconds each connection. A couple of
"curl" sessions were also traced, connecting to port 80, and lasting 91 and 121
milliseconds.
This tool is useful for workload characterisation and flow accounting:
identifying what connections are happening, with the bytes transferred.
Process names are truncated to 10 characters. By using the wide option, -w,
the column width becomes 16 characters. The IP address columns are also wider
to fit IPv6 addresses:
# ./tcplife -w
PID COMM IP LADDR LPORT RADDR RPORT TX_KB RX_KB MS
26315 recordProgramSt 4 127.0.0.1 44188 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.21
3277 redis-server 4 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 44188 0 0 0.26
26320 ssh 6 fe80::8a3:9dff:fed5:6b19 22440 fe80::8a3:9dff:fed5:6b19 22 1 1 457.52
26321 sshd 6 fe80::8a3:9dff:fed5:6b19 22 fe80::8a3:9dff:fed5:6b19 22440 1 1 458.69
26341 recordProgramSt 4 127.0.0.1 44192 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.27
3277 redis-server 4 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 44192 0 0 0.32
In this example, I uploaded a 10 Mbyte file to the server, and then downloaded
it again, using scp:
# ./tcplife
PID COMM LADDR LPORT RADDR RPORT TX_KB RX_KB MS
7715 recordProg 127.0.0.1 50894 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.25
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 50894 0 0 0.30
7619 sshd 100.66.3.172 22 100.127.64.230 63033 5 10255 3066.79
7770 recordProg 127.0.0.1 50896 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.20
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 50896 0 0 0.24
7793 recordProg 127.0.0.1 50898 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.23
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 50898 0 0 0.27
7847 recordProg 127.0.0.1 50900 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.24
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 50900 0 0 0.29
7870 recordProg 127.0.0.1 50902 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.29
3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 50902 0 0 0.30
7798 sshd 100.66.3.172 22 100.127.64.230 64925 10265 6 2176.15
[...]
You can see the 10 Mbytes received by sshd, and then later transmitted. Looks
like receive was slower (3.07 seconds) than transmit (2.18 seconds).
Timestamps can be added with -t:
# ./tcplife -t
TIME(s) PID COMM LADDR LPORT RADDR RPORT TX_KB RX_KB MS
0.000000 5973 recordProg 127.0.0.1 47986 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.25
0.000059 3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 47986 0 0 0.29
1.022454 5996 recordProg 127.0.0.1 47988 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.23
1.022513 3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 47988 0 0 0.27
2.044868 6019 recordProg 127.0.0.1 47990 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.24
2.044924 3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 47990 0 0 0.28
3.069136 6042 recordProg 127.0.0.1 47992 127.0.0.1 28527 0 0 0.22
3.069204 3277 redis-serv 127.0.0.1 28527 127.0.0.1 47992 0 0 0.28
This shows that the recordProg process was connecting once per second.
There's also a -T for HH:MM:SS formatted times.
There's a comma separated values mode, -s. Here it is with both -t and -T
timestamps:
# ./tcplife -stT
TIME,TIME(s),PID,COMM,IP,LADDR,LPORT,RADDR,RPORT,TX_KB,RX_KB,MS
23:39:38,0.000000,7335,recordProgramSt,4,127.0.0.1,48098,127.0.0.1,28527,0,0,0.26
23:39:38,0.000064,3277,redis-server,4,127.0.0.1,28527,127.0.0.1,48098,0,0,0.32
23:39:39,1.025078,7358,recordProgramSt,4,127.0.0.1,48100,127.0.0.1,28527,0,0,0.25
23:39:39,1.025141,3277,redis-server,4,127.0.0.1,28527,127.0.0.1,48100,0,0,0.30
23:39:41,2.040949,7381,recordProgramSt,4,127.0.0.1,48102,127.0.0.1,28527,0,0,0.24
23:39:41,2.041011,3277,redis-server,4,127.0.0.1,28527,127.0.0.1,48102,0,0,0.29
23:39:42,3.067848,7404,recordProgramSt,4,127.0.0.1,48104,127.0.0.1,28527,0,0,0.30
23:39:42,3.067914,3277,redis-server,4,127.0.0.1,28527,127.0.0.1,48104,0,0,0.35
[...]
There are options for filtering on local and remote ports. Here is filtering
on local ports 22 and 80:
# ./tcplife.py -L 22,80
PID COMM LADDR LPORT RADDR RPORT TX_KB RX_KB MS
8301 sshd 100.66.3.172 22 100.127.64.230 58671 3 3 1448.52
[...]
USAGE:
# ./tcplife.py -h
usage: tcplife.py [-h] [-T] [-t] [-w] [-s] [-p PID] [-L LOCALPORT]
[-D REMOTEPORT]
Trace the lifespan of TCP sessions and summarize
optional arguments:
-h, --help show this help message and exit
-T, --time include time column on output (HH:MM:SS)
-t, --timestamp include timestamp on output (seconds)
-w, --wide wide column output (fits IPv6 addresses)
-s, --csv comma seperated values output
-p PID, --pid PID trace this PID only
-L LOCALPORT, --localport LOCALPORT
comma-separated list of local ports to trace.
-D REMOTEPORT, --remoteport REMOTEPORT
comma-separated list of remote ports to trace.
examples:
./tcplife # trace all TCP connect()s
./tcplife -t # include time column (HH:MM:SS)
./tcplife -w # wider colums (fit IPv6)
./tcplife -stT # csv output, with times & timestamps
./tcplife -p 181 # only trace PID 181
./tcplife -L 80 # only trace local port 80
./tcplife -L 80,81 # only trace local ports 80 and 81
./tcplife -D 80 # only trace remote port 80