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Contribution graph can be harmful to contributors #627

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mxsasha opened this Issue Apr 1, 2016 · 189 comments

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mxsasha commented Apr 1, 2016

A common well-being issue in open-source communities is the tendency of people to over-commit. Many contributors care deeply, at the risk of saying yes too often harming their well-being. Open-source communities are especially at risk, because many contributors work next to a full-time job.

The contribution graph and the statistics on it, prominent on everyone's profile, basically rewards people for doing work on as many different days as possible, generally making more contributions, and making contributions on multiple days in a row without a break.

Stepping away from our work regularly is not only important to uphold high quality work, but also to maintain our well-being. For example, I personally do not generally work in the weekends. That’s completely healthy. I take a step back from work and spend time on other things. But in the contribution graph it means I can never make a long streak, even though I do work virtually every day except weekends. So the graph motivates me to work in my weekends as well, and not take breaks. And when I see someone with a 416 day streak, it means they haven’t taken a break for a single day in over a year. Although everyone can make their own choices, it makes me very worried about their well-being.

Any mechanism in our community that motivates people to avoid taking breaks and avoid stepping back, can be harmful to the well-being of contributors and is thereby harmful to open source as a whole. Even though it was probably introduced with the best intentions. If our interests are really in supporting open-source long-term, this graph should be removed or substantially changed so that it no longer punishes healthy behaviour. For example, what if we would give people achievements for taking breaks instead of working non-stop?

I therefore want to ask you to consider removing or substantially changing the contribution graph and it's related statistics, to help guard the well-being of the contributors and the communities.

I also wrote about this in a bit more detail on my blog: http://erik.io/blog/2016/04/01/how-github-contribution-graph-is-harmful/

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steveholden Apr 1, 2016

Thanks for this. I am encouraging my team to think of work as a part of their lives (and setting a good example by being off email while I am on vacation). Stuff like this helps.

steveholden commented Apr 1, 2016

Thanks for this. I am encouraging my team to think of work as a part of their lives (and setting a good example by being off email while I am on vacation). Stuff like this helps.

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cixtor Apr 1, 2016

👍👎😄🎉😕

cixtor commented Apr 1, 2016

👍👎😄🎉😕

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ihsw Apr 1, 2016

You're absolutely wrong, in fact I think it should be updated to more accurately measure their contributions' size as well as frequency.

Let's double the gamification -- lines added and removed should be counted too. The current contribution graph isn't fair and skews it in favour of regular contributions rather than those of significance.

EDIT: In all seriousness, if some people are taking the contribution graph so seriously then that's their own problem.

ihsw commented Apr 1, 2016

You're absolutely wrong, in fact I think it should be updated to more accurately measure their contributions' size as well as frequency.

Let's double the gamification -- lines added and removed should be counted too. The current contribution graph isn't fair and skews it in favour of regular contributions rather than those of significance.

EDIT: In all seriousness, if some people are taking the contribution graph so seriously then that's their own problem.

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yacineMTB Apr 1, 2016

quantity != quality

yacineMTB commented Apr 1, 2016

quantity != quality

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darrencauthon Apr 1, 2016

I don't work on the weekend, either.

But programming is not always work. It's a fun hobby for some of us, and off-hours is a chance to program things that we'd never encounter at work. Those of us that feel this way may be acting in a healthy manner, so... good for us?

Would it make others feel better if those that program so often if we stayed of Github... and binge-watched Netflix or played video games all weekend?

If you feel upset about being judged for not having big Github stats... imagine getting judged as some unhealthy workaholic because you enjoy programming! 😄

darrencauthon commented Apr 1, 2016

I don't work on the weekend, either.

But programming is not always work. It's a fun hobby for some of us, and off-hours is a chance to program things that we'd never encounter at work. Those of us that feel this way may be acting in a healthy manner, so... good for us?

Would it make others feel better if those that program so often if we stayed of Github... and binge-watched Netflix or played video games all weekend?

If you feel upset about being judged for not having big Github stats... imagine getting judged as some unhealthy workaholic because you enjoy programming! 😄

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martindrapeau Apr 1, 2016

Careful about talking about over-commits. Some people commit few changes often, while others commit big changes less often. The result is the same. It is a question of personal style, preference and sometimes depends on the change.

Looking at the number of added and removed lines relative to other contributors in a project, is much more indicative of the contribution.

martindrapeau commented Apr 1, 2016

Careful about talking about over-commits. Some people commit few changes often, while others commit big changes less often. The result is the same. It is a question of personal style, preference and sometimes depends on the change.

Looking at the number of added and removed lines relative to other contributors in a project, is much more indicative of the contribution.

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ocdtrekkie Apr 1, 2016

I am not really a "developer" professionally, and I find the gamification of the contribution activity graph helpful. I've been working on a side project, and I often get stuck on a problem and set it aside. Then my side projects die.

When I started this newest project, I set myself a goal to commit something to GitHub every day. Am I perfect at this? No. I had like an 18 day streak though, and most recently, a 29 day streak. The encouragement that I "need" to look at my code before midnight every day to prevent from breaking a streak has helped me get back to my code regularly, and led me to find solutions to my development roadblocks. After I break a streak, I often end up losing a few days, because the motivation not to break the streak is gone.

I've had a lot of fun with it. Monthly, I write a little post summarizing my statistics for the month on GitHub. And nearly every day, my project gets a little bit better.

ocdtrekkie commented Apr 1, 2016

I am not really a "developer" professionally, and I find the gamification of the contribution activity graph helpful. I've been working on a side project, and I often get stuck on a problem and set it aside. Then my side projects die.

When I started this newest project, I set myself a goal to commit something to GitHub every day. Am I perfect at this? No. I had like an 18 day streak though, and most recently, a 29 day streak. The encouragement that I "need" to look at my code before midnight every day to prevent from breaking a streak has helped me get back to my code regularly, and led me to find solutions to my development roadblocks. After I break a streak, I often end up losing a few days, because the motivation not to break the streak is gone.

I've had a lot of fun with it. Monthly, I write a little post summarizing my statistics for the month on GitHub. And nearly every day, my project gets a little bit better.

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nmccready Apr 1, 2016

Interesting point, it also should be known that the contribution graph can be completely falsified with tools like gelstudios/gitfiti#30 .

nmccready commented Apr 1, 2016

Interesting point, it also should be known that the contribution graph can be completely falsified with tools like gelstudios/gitfiti#30 .

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rickhanlonii Apr 1, 2016

I think that the issue here is strictly the "streak" statistics and not the existance of the graph itself. I don't think there's any issue with tracking and displaying contribution counts since that alone is factual data without any implied interpretation.

The issue with showing the two Streak stats (both longest and current) is that they imply that the most important interpretation is the Streak. That assumes that having a streak is a good thing--something to achieve and wear as a badge.

That's just not the case, and we shouldn't emphasize it. Experienced people in this field know that:

Stepping away from our work regularly is not only important to uphold high quality work, but also to maintain our well-being.

So I would propose we keep the contribution graph and replace the two Streak statistics with something more meaningful and practical like lines per commit and word count per issue, leaving three graphs:

  • Contributions in the last year
  • Lines per commit in the last year
  • Words per issue in the last year

rickhanlonii commented Apr 1, 2016

I think that the issue here is strictly the "streak" statistics and not the existance of the graph itself. I don't think there's any issue with tracking and displaying contribution counts since that alone is factual data without any implied interpretation.

The issue with showing the two Streak stats (both longest and current) is that they imply that the most important interpretation is the Streak. That assumes that having a streak is a good thing--something to achieve and wear as a badge.

That's just not the case, and we shouldn't emphasize it. Experienced people in this field know that:

Stepping away from our work regularly is not only important to uphold high quality work, but also to maintain our well-being.

So I would propose we keep the contribution graph and replace the two Streak statistics with something more meaningful and practical like lines per commit and word count per issue, leaving three graphs:

  • Contributions in the last year
  • Lines per commit in the last year
  • Words per issue in the last year
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ocdtrekkie Apr 1, 2016

@nmccready I hope nobody's seriously treating this like something worth "cheating" at. If my commit isn't in by midnight, I failed my goal, and my streak is broken. There's no reason for me to cheat myself. Obviously, I could ensure I committed every day by holding over changes from days where I have more than one for a day I'm extra busy or something, but again, then I'm just cheating myself.

ocdtrekkie commented Apr 1, 2016

@nmccready I hope nobody's seriously treating this like something worth "cheating" at. If my commit isn't in by midnight, I failed my goal, and my streak is broken. There's no reason for me to cheat myself. Obviously, I could ensure I committed every day by holding over changes from days where I have more than one for a day I'm extra busy or something, but again, then I'm just cheating myself.

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tscizzle Apr 1, 2016

If people want to sacrifice well-being for some idea of progress, it's not necessarily a problem (at least, it's their choice if it's a problem or not). What's troubling is if the idea of progress is somehow misguided, such that people are sacrificing in vain. Because groups of people tend to optimize for whatever is measured, measuring the "wrong" thing can lead to this misguided sacrifice.

If committing everyday is not worth the worsened well-being, it might not be because the well-being sacrifice is so bad, but because the benefit of committing every day is not that good. A more appropriate metric than daily commit streak would address this. Perhaps the change you desire could be some way of measuring the actual value of contributions. Not a line-plus-minus (still optimizing for the wrong thing), but a way to measure how appreciative the users of, and other contributors to, the project are of your contributions.

Then the decision of "commit today, or nah" is actually weighing people's desire for personal well-being against something worth fighting for. Which in my opinion is a more important outcome than just getting people to work less, since it's debatable whether or not working less is ideal (and is not necessarily the job of GitHub to make that judgment).

tscizzle commented Apr 1, 2016

If people want to sacrifice well-being for some idea of progress, it's not necessarily a problem (at least, it's their choice if it's a problem or not). What's troubling is if the idea of progress is somehow misguided, such that people are sacrificing in vain. Because groups of people tend to optimize for whatever is measured, measuring the "wrong" thing can lead to this misguided sacrifice.

If committing everyday is not worth the worsened well-being, it might not be because the well-being sacrifice is so bad, but because the benefit of committing every day is not that good. A more appropriate metric than daily commit streak would address this. Perhaps the change you desire could be some way of measuring the actual value of contributions. Not a line-plus-minus (still optimizing for the wrong thing), but a way to measure how appreciative the users of, and other contributors to, the project are of your contributions.

Then the decision of "commit today, or nah" is actually weighing people's desire for personal well-being against something worth fighting for. Which in my opinion is a more important outcome than just getting people to work less, since it's debatable whether or not working less is ideal (and is not necessarily the job of GitHub to make that judgment).

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rorz Apr 1, 2016

I think it would also be a good idea to give users the option of allowing their private repo contribution graph to be publicly viewable (in an anonymised or obfuscated way so as to retain a level of security). Many contributors, such as myself, work on private repos (for organisations or otherwise) which disproportionately lower the statistics on public profiles and further drive the feeling of needing to be contributing to public repos.

rorz commented Apr 1, 2016

I think it would also be a good idea to give users the option of allowing their private repo contribution graph to be publicly viewable (in an anonymised or obfuscated way so as to retain a level of security). Many contributors, such as myself, work on private repos (for organisations or otherwise) which disproportionately lower the statistics on public profiles and further drive the feeling of needing to be contributing to public repos.

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nwise Apr 1, 2016

It's not the metric you care about, it's your opinion of how it's interpreted. I don't think you should care if someone thinks they can determine your value from this metric. A person's commit streak on Github is only that, a commit streak. While it might indicate workaholism/laziness, it is not enough proof to come to either of those conclusions.

nwise commented Apr 1, 2016

It's not the metric you care about, it's your opinion of how it's interpreted. I don't think you should care if someone thinks they can determine your value from this metric. A person's commit streak on Github is only that, a commit streak. While it might indicate workaholism/laziness, it is not enough proof to come to either of those conclusions.

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davidcoallier Apr 1, 2016

I have a feeling this discussion is going to become extremely subjective. It is based on personal preferences, goals, culture, experiences, and what one considers important.

For some, a long stream is directly equivalent to being a dedicated committer, for others they use the graph as a reminder of what they want to build, whilst others simply do not associate any importance to it.

I personally find the Github commit graph to be the equivalent of the Fitbit "streak" badge for those who are into health gadgets. I use the streak as a reminder that I have to take a rest day, some use the streak in completely other manners. It's up to them really.

Being worried about other people's well-being whilst operating under incomplete information about their lives, struggles, interests, passions, etc. has the downside potential of leading one's perception towards a perception bias.

If it came down to it, I'd vote for an explicit "opt-in" mechanism. This would allow someone to buy into the graph, or simply ignore it and continue with what they are doing.

When I'm worried about a peer's well-being (in the open source world), I try and refer them to the OSMI website's resources section. OSMI is ran by the most incredible @funkatron and his work around open sourcing mental illness is nothing short of inspiring.

davidcoallier commented Apr 1, 2016

I have a feeling this discussion is going to become extremely subjective. It is based on personal preferences, goals, culture, experiences, and what one considers important.

For some, a long stream is directly equivalent to being a dedicated committer, for others they use the graph as a reminder of what they want to build, whilst others simply do not associate any importance to it.

I personally find the Github commit graph to be the equivalent of the Fitbit "streak" badge for those who are into health gadgets. I use the streak as a reminder that I have to take a rest day, some use the streak in completely other manners. It's up to them really.

Being worried about other people's well-being whilst operating under incomplete information about their lives, struggles, interests, passions, etc. has the downside potential of leading one's perception towards a perception bias.

If it came down to it, I'd vote for an explicit "opt-in" mechanism. This would allow someone to buy into the graph, or simply ignore it and continue with what they are doing.

When I'm worried about a peer's well-being (in the open source world), I try and refer them to the OSMI website's resources section. OSMI is ran by the most incredible @funkatron and his work around open sourcing mental illness is nothing short of inspiring.

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TPS Apr 1, 2016

@nmccready I believe @cirosantilli also has quite a bit of experience gaming the graphs, reporting his experiences in #370 & #374.

TPS commented Apr 1, 2016

@nmccready I believe @cirosantilli also has quite a bit of experience gaming the graphs, reporting his experiences in #370 & #374.

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untitaker Apr 1, 2016

@nwise If you think it's just a metric, and the commit streak is merely a statistical value rather than an attempt at gamification, what would a long/short commit streak indicate?

untitaker commented Apr 1, 2016

@nwise If you think it's just a metric, and the commit streak is merely a statistical value rather than an attempt at gamification, what would a long/short commit streak indicate?

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neongreen Apr 1, 2016

@erikr: I'm lazy, and for me the contribution graph is a good way to motivate me to do at least something every day – open an issue I wouldn't have opened otherwise, fix a small bug I wouldn't have fixed otherwise, or simply take a break from binge-reading Homestuck. I don't want the contribution graph to go.

Sure, it can be harmful. It can also be good. And it's possible that it does more harm than good, but how would you know when you haven't even acknowledged the existence of people for whom it's good?

neongreen commented Apr 1, 2016

@erikr: I'm lazy, and for me the contribution graph is a good way to motivate me to do at least something every day – open an issue I wouldn't have opened otherwise, fix a small bug I wouldn't have fixed otherwise, or simply take a break from binge-reading Homestuck. I don't want the contribution graph to go.

Sure, it can be harmful. It can also be good. And it's possible that it does more harm than good, but how would you know when you haven't even acknowledged the existence of people for whom it's good?

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nwise Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker - It means that there are consecutive daily commits with dates from that particular user. It tells us nothing about the conditions or quality of the commits. I think there needs to be a lot more data involved to infer anything more than "consecutive daily commits". If we can match this data with code-quality, programmer happiness, productivity or other developer 'values', maybe then some conclusions can be made.

However, even with said conclusions, there is always a spectrum. Commit streak alone can not be used as a very strong indicator of anything except exactly what it's measuring.

nwise commented Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker - It means that there are consecutive daily commits with dates from that particular user. It tells us nothing about the conditions or quality of the commits. I think there needs to be a lot more data involved to infer anything more than "consecutive daily commits". If we can match this data with code-quality, programmer happiness, productivity or other developer 'values', maybe then some conclusions can be made.

However, even with said conclusions, there is always a spectrum. Commit streak alone can not be used as a very strong indicator of anything except exactly what it's measuring.

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untitaker Apr 1, 2016

@nwise That is my point. The number of consecutive daily contributions is a meaningless statistic, and only useful for luring people into daily use of GitHub.

untitaker commented Apr 1, 2016

@nwise That is my point. The number of consecutive daily contributions is a meaningless statistic, and only useful for luring people into daily use of GitHub.

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lyschoening Apr 1, 2016

The real issue here is that the color of the contributions is green, which is traditionally seen as a positive color. Ideally, good contributions would be marked in green and bad contributions in red. With projects that use CI, a breaking change would automatically be marked "bad". A day with some bad and some good contributions would be a bright orange.

Since not all repositories use CI, contributions that cannot be classified as inherently good or bad would simply be shades of gray. A day with a good contribution and some contributions that cannot be classified would be a dark gray with a shade of green.

The issue of overexertion needs to be addressed as well. After any six day streak all contributions should be marked red until at least one rest day is taken. The exact number needs to be adjustable to account for other cultures where the working week is less or more than seven days. For strongly religious members of one of the Abrahamic religions, a specific rest day needs to be chosen and any contribution on that day should have a small flame (🔥) on them to allude to the fires of hell. As this may be misunderstood by some for political or cultural reasons, the imp (👿) symbol may instead be used by those who prefer it.

lyschoening commented Apr 1, 2016

The real issue here is that the color of the contributions is green, which is traditionally seen as a positive color. Ideally, good contributions would be marked in green and bad contributions in red. With projects that use CI, a breaking change would automatically be marked "bad". A day with some bad and some good contributions would be a bright orange.

Since not all repositories use CI, contributions that cannot be classified as inherently good or bad would simply be shades of gray. A day with a good contribution and some contributions that cannot be classified would be a dark gray with a shade of green.

The issue of overexertion needs to be addressed as well. After any six day streak all contributions should be marked red until at least one rest day is taken. The exact number needs to be adjustable to account for other cultures where the working week is less or more than seven days. For strongly religious members of one of the Abrahamic religions, a specific rest day needs to be chosen and any contribution on that day should have a small flame (🔥) on them to allude to the fires of hell. As this may be misunderstood by some for political or cultural reasons, the imp (👿) symbol may instead be used by those who prefer it.

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nwise Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker - I agree it's meaningless when it's the only data. However, I don't agree that it 'lures people into daily use of GitHub". If we unpack that statement, I think you are making the assumption that GitHub users care about that metric. Do you have any data that would show to what degree GitHub users care? You might very well be right, but I don't think you have enough data to make that assumption.

nwise commented Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker - I agree it's meaningless when it's the only data. However, I don't agree that it 'lures people into daily use of GitHub". If we unpack that statement, I think you are making the assumption that GitHub users care about that metric. Do you have any data that would show to what degree GitHub users care? You might very well be right, but I don't think you have enough data to make that assumption.

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aaron-em Apr 1, 2016

So I wrote a user script. It's very much a first cut at the problem, and only a partial solution, but I guess if it means that much to someone, this is better than nothing?

aaron-em commented Apr 1, 2016

So I wrote a user script. It's very much a first cut at the problem, and only a partial solution, but I guess if it means that much to someone, this is better than nothing?

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josephearl Apr 1, 2016

Several people have pointed out the personal motivational gains from being able to see their contribution graph, it would be a shame to lose this so perhaps it should just be made private (a user can only view their own contributions.

I think the public profile page is probably not the best place to do these sorts of analytics or heuristics, but instead just allow users to manually prioritise and show-case their projects or projects they have worked on. At its best the public profile page could be a "CV" for developers, but it's a long way from that (easy to game streaks, no way to expose private work, GitHub decides how to order things). The problem is that a number of tech/recruiting companies already use at least it partly for that purpose.

josephearl commented Apr 1, 2016

Several people have pointed out the personal motivational gains from being able to see their contribution graph, it would be a shame to lose this so perhaps it should just be made private (a user can only view their own contributions.

I think the public profile page is probably not the best place to do these sorts of analytics or heuristics, but instead just allow users to manually prioritise and show-case their projects or projects they have worked on. At its best the public profile page could be a "CV" for developers, but it's a long way from that (easy to game streaks, no way to expose private work, GitHub decides how to order things). The problem is that a number of tech/recruiting companies already use at least it partly for that purpose.

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untitaker Apr 1, 2016

@nwise Do you have any data that Facebook users care enough about game invites? I myself have no data for whether the GitHub contributions graph has that effect. What matters to me is the intention of putting that graph on the profile page in the first place, and I can see only one possible reason.

untitaker commented Apr 1, 2016

@nwise Do you have any data that Facebook users care enough about game invites? I myself have no data for whether the GitHub contributions graph has that effect. What matters to me is the intention of putting that graph on the profile page in the first place, and I can see only one possible reason.

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nwise Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker - Your ability to see only one possibility does not make it the truth.

nwise commented Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker - Your ability to see only one possibility does not make it the truth.

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xros Apr 1, 2016

Agree somehow.

Useful codes matter infinite times than shabby enormous codes.

Need quality rather than frequency.

xros commented Apr 1, 2016

Agree somehow.

Useful codes matter infinite times than shabby enormous codes.

Need quality rather than frequency.

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untitaker Apr 1, 2016

@nwise This is why I asked in my first post whether you can see any other interpretation.

untitaker commented Apr 1, 2016

@nwise This is why I asked in my first post whether you can see any other interpretation.

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wrq Apr 1, 2016

A person who decides not to take breaks is responsible for their own actions. It is not the fault of the graphs nor is it the burden of GitHub's to shepherd developers and make sure they are taking breaks appropriately. They are not a nanny.

It's shameful and childish that this is even considered a serious issue, I was hoping that this would turn out to be a joke (April fools! ... no?) but sadly, it's true that there are developers who contend that others should be responsible for making good decisions for them, since they are apparently unable to carry out something so simple as working on a project in reasonable chunks of time.

Personally, I think that if a graph is enough to drive you to madly commit yourself to a project for unhealthy amounts of time, maybe you should log out and seek a psychiatrist, rather than blame GitHub.

wrq commented Apr 1, 2016

A person who decides not to take breaks is responsible for their own actions. It is not the fault of the graphs nor is it the burden of GitHub's to shepherd developers and make sure they are taking breaks appropriately. They are not a nanny.

It's shameful and childish that this is even considered a serious issue, I was hoping that this would turn out to be a joke (April fools! ... no?) but sadly, it's true that there are developers who contend that others should be responsible for making good decisions for them, since they are apparently unable to carry out something so simple as working on a project in reasonable chunks of time.

Personally, I think that if a graph is enough to drive you to madly commit yourself to a project for unhealthy amounts of time, maybe you should log out and seek a psychiatrist, rather than blame GitHub.

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elfenars Apr 1, 2016

There's more than just one side to this. While I cannot speak from the contributor perspective as I'm not a contributor of any opensource projects, I do contribute when I can to either private or very minor projects.

The graph for me has a whole other meaning, even in my company we use it sometimes as a (very subjective) number to get an idea of how active an applicant was in the recent past.

Also as a dev it helps you check your current stats. Obvious ones as "how many times did I commited yesterday?" and "oh... so I'm coding more on tuesdays apparently"... and not-so-obvious ones like "maybe I should start paying attention to my overall contributions on other projects".

I think this whole idea of taking it out comes from just one side of the pond, while there's a lot of us using github from very different sides as well.

And finally, if you're really getting motivated to work on a weekend because "my graph may look empty", I think there's a serious incentive problem here, which is very particular to @erikr and that's not really Github's fault or any other person's fault.

elfenars commented Apr 1, 2016

There's more than just one side to this. While I cannot speak from the contributor perspective as I'm not a contributor of any opensource projects, I do contribute when I can to either private or very minor projects.

The graph for me has a whole other meaning, even in my company we use it sometimes as a (very subjective) number to get an idea of how active an applicant was in the recent past.

Also as a dev it helps you check your current stats. Obvious ones as "how many times did I commited yesterday?" and "oh... so I'm coding more on tuesdays apparently"... and not-so-obvious ones like "maybe I should start paying attention to my overall contributions on other projects".

I think this whole idea of taking it out comes from just one side of the pond, while there's a lot of us using github from very different sides as well.

And finally, if you're really getting motivated to work on a weekend because "my graph may look empty", I think there's a serious incentive problem here, which is very particular to @erikr and that's not really Github's fault or any other person's fault.

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joantune Apr 1, 2016

Non issue, just stop comparing yourself with others.

These streaks and graphs have that negative side, if you choose to use it for comparison like that.

@ihsw : Any reasonable software engineer will tell you that the number of commits, or even the number of lines altered does not necessarily reflect the effort that one put behind a commit.

Sometimes it takes a lot of debugging to change a couple of lines of code, sometimes the better solution is not to add hundreds of lines of code but do your research and don't reinvent the wheel.

Sometimes activity does not necessarily mean progress.

Sometimes getting to understand the domain first is a struggle and requires lots of code reading before you can start contributing.

And this way of measurement (by number of commits and/or number of lines commited) can be harmful in the following ways:
Bias towards writing code instead of research/thinking;
Bias towards non DRY code reuse;
Anxiousness when you're doing important 'state of the art like' research instead of writing code as you might feel that you're not progressing (when sometimes it's preferable that you do some research before [the equilibrium of this depends on the task and your experience, and even programming styles]).
These kinds of 'scripts' that I saw references to, and breaking up changes in tiny commits just because of the stats.

Now, one should be aware of this, and like many posted above, there are advantages to the stats, so, @erikr don't choose the dark side of the stats :)

joantune commented Apr 1, 2016

Non issue, just stop comparing yourself with others.

These streaks and graphs have that negative side, if you choose to use it for comparison like that.

@ihsw : Any reasonable software engineer will tell you that the number of commits, or even the number of lines altered does not necessarily reflect the effort that one put behind a commit.

Sometimes it takes a lot of debugging to change a couple of lines of code, sometimes the better solution is not to add hundreds of lines of code but do your research and don't reinvent the wheel.

Sometimes activity does not necessarily mean progress.

Sometimes getting to understand the domain first is a struggle and requires lots of code reading before you can start contributing.

And this way of measurement (by number of commits and/or number of lines commited) can be harmful in the following ways:
Bias towards writing code instead of research/thinking;
Bias towards non DRY code reuse;
Anxiousness when you're doing important 'state of the art like' research instead of writing code as you might feel that you're not progressing (when sometimes it's preferable that you do some research before [the equilibrium of this depends on the task and your experience, and even programming styles]).
These kinds of 'scripts' that I saw references to, and breaking up changes in tiny commits just because of the stats.

Now, one should be aware of this, and like many posted above, there are advantages to the stats, so, @erikr don't choose the dark side of the stats :)

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untitaker Apr 1, 2016

@wrq You are implying that humans can isolate and protect themselves from all kinds of psychological manipulation, and that people who somehow let other parties influence their decisions are considered "weak" and should, as you say, seek a psychiatrist.

  • If I call you an asshole, would you blame yourself for being offended?
  • If Wall Street causes the next financial crisis, would you blame the 99% for "submitting to the system" in the first place?
  • If Facebook makes modifications to their UI in an attempt to make usage addictive, would you only blame the user?

I don't even disagree with you that people are responsible for their own actions, even in this case. But I don't think they're the only ones responsible.

untitaker commented Apr 1, 2016

@wrq You are implying that humans can isolate and protect themselves from all kinds of psychological manipulation, and that people who somehow let other parties influence their decisions are considered "weak" and should, as you say, seek a psychiatrist.

  • If I call you an asshole, would you blame yourself for being offended?
  • If Wall Street causes the next financial crisis, would you blame the 99% for "submitting to the system" in the first place?
  • If Facebook makes modifications to their UI in an attempt to make usage addictive, would you only blame the user?

I don't even disagree with you that people are responsible for their own actions, even in this case. But I don't think they're the only ones responsible.

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ihsw Apr 1, 2016

@joantune You have a point, even lines added/lines removed count is not appropriate for this situation.

The problem is people are using it as a signal for measuring someone's worth.

There are so many other signals -- learning new programming languages, fixing broken tests/increasing test coverage, creating awesome new features, cleaning up crufty API libraries, and so forth -- but GitHub isn't showing them on profile pages.

Clearly there is a desire for such signals as people are either 1) using it to elevate one's perceived stature 2) using it to measure other people's perceived stature.

Personally I think this is an opportunity for GitHub to obviate such a signal, one that accurately measures someone's quality of work.

ihsw commented Apr 1, 2016

@joantune You have a point, even lines added/lines removed count is not appropriate for this situation.

The problem is people are using it as a signal for measuring someone's worth.

There are so many other signals -- learning new programming languages, fixing broken tests/increasing test coverage, creating awesome new features, cleaning up crufty API libraries, and so forth -- but GitHub isn't showing them on profile pages.

Clearly there is a desire for such signals as people are either 1) using it to elevate one's perceived stature 2) using it to measure other people's perceived stature.

Personally I think this is an opportunity for GitHub to obviate such a signal, one that accurately measures someone's quality of work.

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Tarabass Apr 1, 2016

Commiting (and writing) code is just a very small part of our jobs. Maybe 10%. Sometimes I am weeks offline living in a cave designing, prototyping and thinking about how I should write and structure my projects. I've thrown away millions lines of code. I am not a active github user on public repos and don't care about github a lot, but thinking that a graph can be harmful is just sad. Who cares? You have to outgrow. Our juniors are commiting/pushing their code every day, if some graph tells you that they are better/more productive programmers so be it..

Tarabass commented Apr 1, 2016

Commiting (and writing) code is just a very small part of our jobs. Maybe 10%. Sometimes I am weeks offline living in a cave designing, prototyping and thinking about how I should write and structure my projects. I've thrown away millions lines of code. I am not a active github user on public repos and don't care about github a lot, but thinking that a graph can be harmful is just sad. Who cares? You have to outgrow. Our juniors are commiting/pushing their code every day, if some graph tells you that they are better/more productive programmers so be it..

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wrq Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker Yes, to all.

I'm not absolving Github of blame, and nobody can do it, because NO system is perfect. Rather, each has individual flaws and drawbacks, as well as advantages, etc.

It is the user's responsibility to look at a system they use and ask themselves:

"Is this beneficial to me? Am I completing more work, or producing better work, or completing tasks quicker, because of this system?"

That's more than one question, but anyways, you catch my drift.

I don't want to sidetrack onto what is offensive and what isn't, as in your first point, but I hold myself to the standards that I preach and defend. I would never ask someone to consider a standard of operation that I could not myself reproduce. That would be dishonest.

Thusly, I can't sit here and say, "Oh, well it's definitely Github's fault for putting this ADDICTIVE graph right where my eyes look. How dare they try to DISRUPT my workflow by providing more information about the project for free! Those animals, have they no humanity?"

I just can't. The furthest I'd be willing to lean in that direction would be user settings to hide/show graphs. I think that'd be slick anyways, to get more control over what data we see and whatnot. But I won't claim that it's GitHub's responsibility to provide that, and it won't break my heart should they choose to ignore this issue entirely and focus on actually getting work done rather than complaining about features that other people use to get work done, and complaining that these same features are somehow responsible for choices that other users VOLUNTARILY make.

If I don't sound exasperated, please know that I am, and that I chose to be.

wrq commented Apr 1, 2016

@untitaker Yes, to all.

I'm not absolving Github of blame, and nobody can do it, because NO system is perfect. Rather, each has individual flaws and drawbacks, as well as advantages, etc.

It is the user's responsibility to look at a system they use and ask themselves:

"Is this beneficial to me? Am I completing more work, or producing better work, or completing tasks quicker, because of this system?"

That's more than one question, but anyways, you catch my drift.

I don't want to sidetrack onto what is offensive and what isn't, as in your first point, but I hold myself to the standards that I preach and defend. I would never ask someone to consider a standard of operation that I could not myself reproduce. That would be dishonest.

Thusly, I can't sit here and say, "Oh, well it's definitely Github's fault for putting this ADDICTIVE graph right where my eyes look. How dare they try to DISRUPT my workflow by providing more information about the project for free! Those animals, have they no humanity?"

I just can't. The furthest I'd be willing to lean in that direction would be user settings to hide/show graphs. I think that'd be slick anyways, to get more control over what data we see and whatnot. But I won't claim that it's GitHub's responsibility to provide that, and it won't break my heart should they choose to ignore this issue entirely and focus on actually getting work done rather than complaining about features that other people use to get work done, and complaining that these same features are somehow responsible for choices that other users VOLUNTARILY make.

If I don't sound exasperated, please know that I am, and that I chose to be.

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joantune Apr 1, 2016

@ihsw : I agree with most of what you said, minus with the part that 'Github should obviate such a signal' people that judge based solely on Github graphs are not making good judgements, and for some folks, like @ocdtrekkie the stats have a positive effect, so, I would maintain them

joantune commented Apr 1, 2016

@ihsw : I agree with most of what you said, minus with the part that 'Github should obviate such a signal' people that judge based solely on Github graphs are not making good judgements, and for some folks, like @ocdtrekkie the stats have a positive effect, so, I would maintain them

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KevinGrandon Apr 1, 2016

Help, stuck in a Github streak and can't get out.

This is a tool, and I don't think that this is a bad tool though. If it does encourage a way of working, that's more frequent/smaller commits, and I'm not so sure that's a bad thing. Landing huge diffs that are extremely hard to review is a big problem in the industry.

If you don't like the tool, perhaps just hide it with a user script?

KevinGrandon commented Apr 1, 2016

Help, stuck in a Github streak and can't get out.

This is a tool, and I don't think that this is a bad tool though. If it does encourage a way of working, that's more frequent/smaller commits, and I'm not so sure that's a bad thing. Landing huge diffs that are extremely hard to review is a big problem in the industry.

If you don't like the tool, perhaps just hide it with a user script?

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johnstt Apr 1, 2016

Fact: this is an april fools' post

Fact: the contributions graph is designed for petty bragging, scouting vulnerable junior employees and reinforcing the 'work for free while our company gets rich' culture of open source

Fact: my entire contributions graph is comments on pedantic github issues because I moved all my projects off github

johnstt commented Apr 1, 2016

Fact: this is an april fools' post

Fact: the contributions graph is designed for petty bragging, scouting vulnerable junior employees and reinforcing the 'work for free while our company gets rich' culture of open source

Fact: my entire contributions graph is comments on pedantic github issues because I moved all my projects off github

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wrq Apr 1, 2016

@johnstt Did you read OP's accompanying blog post? I fear that it may be serious, to him.

wrq commented Apr 1, 2016

@johnstt Did you read OP's accompanying blog post? I fear that it may be serious, to him.

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johnstt Apr 1, 2016

I hope it is, since I agree with it. The fact that it could be a joke and you guys are all diving on it to write tryhard essays only makes it better.

johnstt commented Apr 1, 2016

I hope it is, since I agree with it. The fact that it could be a joke and you guys are all diving on it to write tryhard essays only makes it better.

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johnstt May 24, 2016

Oh, so you 'challenged yourself to attempt' something ... I get it now.

Best of luck, I guess! Make sure to report back here on January 1st 2017.
Welp, back to my workout alt-tabs back to readme.md

johnstt commented May 24, 2016

Oh, so you 'challenged yourself to attempt' something ... I get it now.

Best of luck, I guess! Make sure to report back here on January 1st 2017.
Welp, back to my workout alt-tabs back to readme.md

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darxtrix May 26, 2016

Coding/Contributing is just like any other exercise. So, you like to keep track of things, what you did yesterday or the other day. It helps you get better over time and you can always improve by looking over the past and get motivated 😄

Well, showing off to other users is a point. So, the best will be to provide some sort of setting to turn this on/off.

darxtrix commented May 26, 2016

Coding/Contributing is just like any other exercise. So, you like to keep track of things, what you did yesterday or the other day. It helps you get better over time and you can always improve by looking over the past and get motivated 😄

Well, showing off to other users is a point. So, the best will be to provide some sort of setting to turn this on/off.

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ticki May 26, 2016

Well, showing off is one thing. A whole other thing is that these numbers are in no way representing for your abilities. One can easily produce a lot of low-quality code. Such contributions shouldn't be rated higher simply out of quantity.

ticki commented May 26, 2016

Well, showing off is one thing. A whole other thing is that these numbers are in no way representing for your abilities. One can easily produce a lot of low-quality code. Such contributions shouldn't be rated higher simply out of quantity.

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gabrielcsapo May 26, 2016

@ticki but at least let people internalize those metrics with themselves? Github has no way of seeing how often you work, what your daily code count is, and the like.

gabrielcsapo commented May 26, 2016

@ticki but at least let people internalize those metrics with themselves? Github has no way of seeing how often you work, what your daily code count is, and the like.

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johnstt May 26, 2016

"Letting people internalize something" isn't without its issues. They can internalize something that doesn't mean what it purports to, or has an overall negative benefit. For someone designing features like this at Github, the attitude should not be 'more options are always better'.

Anything that becomes a 'normal part of github' sets a big precedent. As we can see in this thread, people latch on to these features and it changes them. You can say "it's up to the users if they want to misunderstand streaks", but that's somewhat irresponsible. In this thread alone, there's a huge tendency of people toward using the streaks and other metrics as a way to shame and discredit people.

Is it worth having this 'fake meritocracy' emerging in exchange for allowing the more polite users to set goals for themselves and count their own streaks? What about the people who stop a streak and say in retrospect that maintaining it was like a serious addiction and they feel badly about it? The streak feature probably isn't "just another option" to them.

It can't just be about setting personal goals when there's no way to make profiles private.

johnstt commented May 26, 2016

"Letting people internalize something" isn't without its issues. They can internalize something that doesn't mean what it purports to, or has an overall negative benefit. For someone designing features like this at Github, the attitude should not be 'more options are always better'.

Anything that becomes a 'normal part of github' sets a big precedent. As we can see in this thread, people latch on to these features and it changes them. You can say "it's up to the users if they want to misunderstand streaks", but that's somewhat irresponsible. In this thread alone, there's a huge tendency of people toward using the streaks and other metrics as a way to shame and discredit people.

Is it worth having this 'fake meritocracy' emerging in exchange for allowing the more polite users to set goals for themselves and count their own streaks? What about the people who stop a streak and say in retrospect that maintaining it was like a serious addiction and they feel badly about it? The streak feature probably isn't "just another option" to them.

It can't just be about setting personal goals when there's no way to make profiles private.

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gabrielcsapo May 26, 2016

@johnstt then I would think setting profiles to private would be the first order on an agenda to make github more personal focused

gabrielcsapo commented May 26, 2016

@johnstt then I would think setting profiles to private would be the first order on an agenda to make github more personal focused

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ocdtrekkie May 26, 2016

There is no fake meritocracy except in the heads of people who are somehow upset their profile graphs aren't as colorful as other people's.

ocdtrekkie commented May 26, 2016

There is no fake meritocracy except in the heads of people who are somehow upset their profile graphs aren't as colorful as other people's.

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johnstt May 26, 2016

@ocdtrekkie Do me a favour. Search for 'zero' on this page and tell me if you find anything common about the posts that show up. That's just a small slice of how people use these metrics features to squabble about who's a bigger contributor instead of writing code.

It's really easy to say I'm upset, but it's harder to give it the ol' college try and do some thinking.

johnstt commented May 26, 2016

@ocdtrekkie Do me a favour. Search for 'zero' on this page and tell me if you find anything common about the posts that show up. That's just a small slice of how people use these metrics features to squabble about who's a bigger contributor instead of writing code.

It's really easy to say I'm upset, but it's harder to give it the ol' college try and do some thinking.

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ocdtrekkie May 27, 2016

Let's be clear, @johnstt, someone commenting on public metrics who isn't trolling would have at least one public contribution.

ocdtrekkie commented May 27, 2016

Let's be clear, @johnstt, someone commenting on public metrics who isn't trolling would have at least one public contribution.

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johnstt May 27, 2016

There's nothing clear about that. You just said a bunch of bullshit to make yourself feel good.

johnstt commented May 27, 2016

There's nothing clear about that. You just said a bunch of bullshit to make yourself feel good.

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marshallvaughn May 27, 2016

If you don't like the streak mentality don't use it. "I don't like it" should not equate to "it shouldn't exist for anyone."

marshallvaughn commented May 27, 2016

If you don't like the streak mentality don't use it. "I don't like it" should not equate to "it shouldn't exist for anyone."

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johnstt May 27, 2016

"I don't like it" should not equate to "it shouldn't exist for anyone."

I agree. But that doesn't mean it's immune to criticism.
I'm not trying to equate these things (and neither was the original poster with the blog entry).

Maybe it shouldn't exist for other reasons? Maybe I should be able to opt out of it if that's how I want to use github?

johnstt commented May 27, 2016

"I don't like it" should not equate to "it shouldn't exist for anyone."

I agree. But that doesn't mean it's immune to criticism.
I'm not trying to equate these things (and neither was the original poster with the blog entry).

Maybe it shouldn't exist for other reasons? Maybe I should be able to opt out of it if that's how I want to use github?

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marshallvaughn May 27, 2016

On that point we agree. And I do see the arguments against, in that it became a false identifier for one's merit as a programmer, or perhaps encouraged the wrong things. I'm frustrated because a tool I enjoyed using is gone, and as far as I can tell the reason is because it was misused by some.

The opt-out would have been an elegant approach. Or maybe make my streak only visible to me and no-one else. I wish there had been some kind of fix for it rather than across-the-board abolition.

marshallvaughn commented May 27, 2016

On that point we agree. And I do see the arguments against, in that it became a false identifier for one's merit as a programmer, or perhaps encouraged the wrong things. I'm frustrated because a tool I enjoyed using is gone, and as far as I can tell the reason is because it was misused by some.

The opt-out would have been an elegant approach. Or maybe make my streak only visible to me and no-one else. I wish there had been some kind of fix for it rather than across-the-board abolition.

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KeyWeeUsr May 28, 2016

Making it available at least for users only as e.g. Graphs/Traffic would be awesome!

I really don't understand that whining about streaks. As far as I'm concerned the streak (even if incomplete) motivates me to do something and to return to my projects no matter if they are public or just hanging on my hdd. If I break out of the "streak" it doesn't mean I won't code the day after, but if I stay not coding two-three or more days without coding, then I rather play solitaire and stuff rather than coding (and I love coding!), cuz I'm lazy AF.

I'm a simple man: Green = Happy, mode green = more happy and so I code/fix/write-docs more just of damn curiosity how to make things better or pretty. I'm hobby-coder, I don't care if someone looks at my profile or what. Also the reason to remove something just because some minority doesn't feel good about it is plainly worldwide retarded. Do some of you remember Switzerland and attempt to remove the cross from its flag? Just saying...

Similar situation as the "issue" with streaks happened to me with Google Docs/Translate. I can't work with these apps at night because that white background burns my eyes. Do you see me whining at Google's sites? No. I made custom css, put it to userscript and replaced it with dark theme. You don't like some feature? Good, remove it for yourself and don't force others to suffer just because you feel so.. you child...

Oh and.. here have fun on other browsers too! (e.g. Tampermonkey) ^^

KeyWeeUsr commented May 28, 2016

Making it available at least for users only as e.g. Graphs/Traffic would be awesome!

I really don't understand that whining about streaks. As far as I'm concerned the streak (even if incomplete) motivates me to do something and to return to my projects no matter if they are public or just hanging on my hdd. If I break out of the "streak" it doesn't mean I won't code the day after, but if I stay not coding two-three or more days without coding, then I rather play solitaire and stuff rather than coding (and I love coding!), cuz I'm lazy AF.

I'm a simple man: Green = Happy, mode green = more happy and so I code/fix/write-docs more just of damn curiosity how to make things better or pretty. I'm hobby-coder, I don't care if someone looks at my profile or what. Also the reason to remove something just because some minority doesn't feel good about it is plainly worldwide retarded. Do some of you remember Switzerland and attempt to remove the cross from its flag? Just saying...

Similar situation as the "issue" with streaks happened to me with Google Docs/Translate. I can't work with these apps at night because that white background burns my eyes. Do you see me whining at Google's sites? No. I made custom css, put it to userscript and replaced it with dark theme. You don't like some feature? Good, remove it for yourself and don't force others to suffer just because you feel so.. you child...

Oh and.. here have fun on other browsers too! (e.g. Tampermonkey) ^^

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benwiley4000 May 29, 2016

I don't really care about this change, whatever, but I have never heard anyone use the term "well-being" so much and so needlessly in my life.

benwiley4000 commented May 29, 2016

I don't really care about this change, whatever, but I have never heard anyone use the term "well-being" so much and so needlessly in my life.

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HeroCC May 29, 2016

I personally enjoy the contribution graphs, and agree with @ihsw. I loved my graph stats, and although I don't have a full programming job, I was very proud of my 123 day streak. If people rather not see their graph they should be able to disable it, but I found it a useful and fun metric. That's just my opinion though.

HeroCC commented May 29, 2016

I personally enjoy the contribution graphs, and agree with @ihsw. I loved my graph stats, and although I don't have a full programming job, I was very proud of my 123 day streak. If people rather not see their graph they should be able to disable it, but I found it a useful and fun metric. That's just my opinion though.

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antonioortegajr Jun 9, 2016

All my code is awful. Future me agrees. Still I'm here always trying. That doesn't count for everything, but it counts for something. That alone I think has value. Enough to combat those looking game the system.

antonioortegajr commented Jun 9, 2016

All my code is awful. Future me agrees. Still I'm here always trying. That doesn't count for everything, but it counts for something. That alone I think has value. Enough to combat those looking game the system.

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wrq Jun 9, 2016

I started using a self-hosted Git + Gitlab because of some of the comments here. A lot of you are making Github a weaker platform by being weak people. It's honestly disgraceful that some of you are so fragile that a graph hurts your feelings, and I can't in good faith host my code anywhere that panders to that sort of behavior.

wrq commented Jun 9, 2016

I started using a self-hosted Git + Gitlab because of some of the comments here. A lot of you are making Github a weaker platform by being weak people. It's honestly disgraceful that some of you are so fragile that a graph hurts your feelings, and I can't in good faith host my code anywhere that panders to that sort of behavior.

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Mottie Jun 10, 2016

Time to close this issue?

Mottie commented Jun 10, 2016

Time to close this issue?

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PhantomYdn Jun 25, 2016

As for me: it's quite sad that GitHub removed counter. It was very good motivation technique. If you miss a day - you can miss two and many more. It forced you to constantly think about your project - and from my perspective: that's good. But I do understand opposite opinion: that's why making counter configurable would be much more wise decision.

PhantomYdn commented Jun 25, 2016

As for me: it's quite sad that GitHub removed counter. It was very good motivation technique. If you miss a day - you can miss two and many more. It forced you to constantly think about your project - and from my perspective: that's good. But I do understand opposite opinion: that's why making counter configurable would be much more wise decision.

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docdawning Jun 25, 2016

I hope they bring the streak counter back, perhaps expanded upon in such a way as to lend more depth and meaning to it.

I admit at times I would make a super minor edit to a readme or something to keep my streak going (I honestly almost typed 'game' there instead of 'streak'). Anyway, it's not THAT important, but I certainly enjoy the gamification effects in github and I'd rather they expand on them if possible.

docdawning commented Jun 25, 2016

I hope they bring the streak counter back, perhaps expanded upon in such a way as to lend more depth and meaning to it.

I admit at times I would make a super minor edit to a readme or something to keep my streak going (I honestly almost typed 'game' there instead of 'streak'). Anyway, it's not THAT important, but I certainly enjoy the gamification effects in github and I'd rather they expand on them if possible.

msj2 added a commit to msj2/keepy that referenced this issue Aug 15, 2016

https://github.com/Manasmitha/AutoHotkey_L/tree/master/source https:…
…//www.google.co.in/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8&client=ubuntu#q=maintani%20streak%20git https://github.com/ainsleyc/git-hiatus isaacs/github#627 https://www.natashatherobot.com/streak-github-mistakes/ http://code.dblock.org/2011/07/14/github-is-your-new-resume.html https://ryanseys.com/projects https://github.com/ryanseys/keepy/edit/master/README.md http://tom.preston-werner.com/2010/08/23/readme-driven-development.html https://github.com/ryanseys/edit-my-readme https://blog.jcoglan.com/2013/11/15/why-github-is-not-your-cv/ https://www.quora.com/What-is-your-longest-streak-on-GitHub grant/school-of-tech#9 http://ejohn.org/blog/write-code-every-day/ https://grant.cm/ https://peak5390.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/what-ive-learned-from-my-first-30-day-github-streak/ https://peak5390.wordpress.com/2015/12/16/unfinished-projects-one-last-programming-lesson-from-my-dad/ https://peak5390.wordpress.com/2013/12/08/ninety-days-on-github/ https://peak5390.wordpress.com/2013/09/22/how-ipython-notebook-and-github-have-changed-the-way-i-teach-python/ https://peak5390.wordpress.com/2013/11/08/github-streak-days-31-60-what-ive-learned/ https://peak5390.wordpress.com/2014/04/12/processing-a-long-list-efficiently-in-python/ https://www.google.co.in/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8&client=ubuntu#q=keepy

Screwing up Ryan's readme, in the spirit, what I read today!! https://ryanseys.com/post/contribute-to-readmes
Hope this deserves an email or a brickbat :)
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jcrben Nov 11, 2016

Please close this.

jcrben commented Nov 11, 2016

Please close this.

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elthariel Nov 13, 2016

It's gone :'(

elthariel commented Nov 13, 2016

It's gone :'(

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amarlearning Mar 12, 2017

Hello
I wrote a proposal for my GSOC project, anybody here who can review it ?

From,
Amar Prakash Pandey
http://amarpandey.me

amarlearning commented Mar 12, 2017

Hello
I wrote a proposal for my GSOC project, anybody here who can review it ?

From,
Amar Prakash Pandey
http://amarpandey.me

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dideler Mar 13, 2017

Think it's time to lock the thread.

dideler commented Mar 13, 2017

Think it's time to lock the thread.

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KelvinShadewing Jun 12, 2017

I don't see what the harm is. Just because they're gamifying your commits doesn't mean you have to play. If you don't wanna worry about that graph, then don't.

KelvinShadewing commented Jun 12, 2017

I don't see what the harm is. Just because they're gamifying your commits doesn't mean you have to play. If you don't wanna worry about that graph, then don't.

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agungyuliaji Jul 27, 2017

I don't really care about the graph, since I writing the code with love ❤️
btw time to close this thread. 👍

agungyuliaji commented Jul 27, 2017

I don't really care about the graph, since I writing the code with love ❤️
btw time to close this thread. 👍

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KOLANICH Aug 22, 2017

IMHO, if people are too affected by gamification, for example as much so they really work all year long (not faking it with scripts) only to get beautiful picture in the profile, it's their mental problems, similar to the ones expirienced by MMORPG addicts. They need to consult a doctor. Removing this feature from GH won't help them to solve this problem. If they really want to work all year long by other reason, it's their choice. I see no reason to remove that.

KOLANICH commented Aug 22, 2017

IMHO, if people are too affected by gamification, for example as much so they really work all year long (not faking it with scripts) only to get beautiful picture in the profile, it's their mental problems, similar to the ones expirienced by MMORPG addicts. They need to consult a doctor. Removing this feature from GH won't help them to solve this problem. If they really want to work all year long by other reason, it's their choice. I see no reason to remove that.

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johnstt Aug 22, 2017

...says the guy replying to a year-old thread full of Exemplary Users

johnstt commented Aug 22, 2017

...says the guy replying to a year-old thread full of Exemplary Users

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SEAPUNK Aug 22, 2017

@KOLANICH You do realize that you can fake your graph, right? It's not that hard, there are scripts that do it for you. The vast majority of users who create a fancy image on their contribution graph do it with those tools.

SEAPUNK commented Aug 22, 2017

@KOLANICH You do realize that you can fake your graph, right? It's not that hard, there are scripts that do it for you. The vast majority of users who create a fancy image on their contribution graph do it with those tools.

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ocdtrekkie Aug 22, 2017

@SEAPUNK Obviously people who care about the graphs as a method of goal-setting are likely going to be honest to themselves. Nobody's suggesting this should be a valid way to compare yourself to others.

ocdtrekkie commented Aug 22, 2017

@SEAPUNK Obviously people who care about the graphs as a method of goal-setting are likely going to be honest to themselves. Nobody's suggesting this should be a valid way to compare yourself to others.

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KOLANICH Aug 23, 2017

@SEAPUNK, of course I know. Changed that comment to clarify my opinion.

KOLANICH commented Aug 23, 2017

@SEAPUNK, of course I know. Changed that comment to clarify my opinion.

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naeemkhan12 Nov 16, 2017

can't judge someone's work with graphs 😃

naeemkhan12 commented Nov 16, 2017

can't judge someone's work with graphs 😃

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CatzillaOrz Nov 24, 2017

You think it is a graphic thing, then it is. But I think it is a timeline of my commitment.

It's so amazing, it's like a track, I can find what I‘ve done this years or last year.

Especially, when you hover on it, it can tell you how many commitments and what you've committed.

This function is really helpful & useful.

CatzillaOrz commented Nov 24, 2017

You think it is a graphic thing, then it is. But I think it is a timeline of my commitment.

It's so amazing, it's like a track, I can find what I‘ve done this years or last year.

Especially, when you hover on it, it can tell you how many commitments and what you've committed.

This function is really helpful & useful.

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BigRiceEater Jan 18, 2018

But even lines added/removed is another false way to judge the contribution of a developer. It's so easy to just copy and paste code into the project. There's no evidence to suggest the person who committed those thousands of lines know or even understand what it does, just that it solves the problem when they googled it.

BigRiceEater commented Jan 18, 2018

But even lines added/removed is another false way to judge the contribution of a developer. It's so easy to just copy and paste code into the project. There's no evidence to suggest the person who committed those thousands of lines know or even understand what it does, just that it solves the problem when they googled it.

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BigRiceEater Jan 18, 2018

My coding style would also dictate how many 'lines' are added.

public class Person 
{
    private string _name;
    public Person(string name)
    {
        _name = name;
    }
}

8 lines compared to 4 lines

public class Person {
    private string _name;
    public Person(name) : _name(name){}
}

BigRiceEater commented Jan 18, 2018

My coding style would also dictate how many 'lines' are added.

public class Person 
{
    private string _name;
    public Person(string name)
    {
        _name = name;
    }
}

8 lines compared to 4 lines

public class Person {
    private string _name;
    public Person(name) : _name(name){}
}
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georgehank Jun 2, 2018

That someone commits something every day does not mean they didn't take any break at all.

You do not know how they spend their day. Maybe, as someone above mentioned, they just make it a habit of checking their project at least once a day and look for something to improve. Maybe one day they spent the whole day at the pool, and late at night they fix a minor bug just so they keep their hands in it. How can you tell? You can't.

If someone used the graph against you, now that is a different matter. But that's akin to… someone killing someone with a hammer. Misuse of tool is not the tool's fault.

georgehank commented Jun 2, 2018

That someone commits something every day does not mean they didn't take any break at all.

You do not know how they spend their day. Maybe, as someone above mentioned, they just make it a habit of checking their project at least once a day and look for something to improve. Maybe one day they spent the whole day at the pool, and late at night they fix a minor bug just so they keep their hands in it. How can you tell? You can't.

If someone used the graph against you, now that is a different matter. But that's akin to… someone killing someone with a hammer. Misuse of tool is not the tool's fault.

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