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some tweaks and reorg

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commit 173de3d985d116187c322f94c960478bce94f9e9 1 parent 43a376f
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  1. +6 −5 after-cs106a.html
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11 after-cs106a.html
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<h3>Myths</h3>
-<p class="p1">There are a few common misconceptions about computer science, such as "CS is all about programming -- programming fast and hardcore." Extra time spent programming says more about quality, testing, thoughtfulness, previous experience, style, unforeseen bugs, and engagement than it does about CS talent. Code quality, good style, and proper design are much more valuable than speed. So, spending fifteen hours versus five hours on your CS106A assignment says nothing about your fitness as a computer scientist. More importantly, computer science is about way more than programming. It's more about a way of thinking and problem-solving through computing, sometimes using programming as a tool and means of expression. In fact, around half of the CS core (CS103, CS109, and CS161) are problem-set-oriented theory courses. </p>
+<p class="p1">There are a few common myths about computer science, such as "CS is all about programming -- programming fast and hardcore." Extra time spent programming says more about quality, testing, thoughtfulness, previous experience, style, unforeseen bugs, and engagement than it does about CS talent. Code quality, good style, and proper design are much more valuable than speed. So, spending fifteen hours versus five hours on your CS106A assignment says nothing about your fitness as a computer scientist. More importantly, computer science is about way more than programming. It's more about a way of thinking and problem-solving through computing, sometimes using programming as a tool and means of expression. In fact, around half of the CS core (CS103, CS109, and CS161) are problem-set-oriented theory courses. </p>
<p class="p1">Another misconception is the feeling of "I did well in CS106A, but everyone else is better and I'm not actually good at CS." This sense of "feeling like a fraud" is called impostor syndrome, and it's extremely common (<a href="https://www.google.com/search?sourceid=chrome&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;q=impostor+syndrome#sclient=psy-ab&amp;hl=en&amp;source=hp&amp;q=impostor+syndrome+cs&amp;pbx=1&amp;oq=impostor+syndrome+cs&amp;aq=f&amp;aqi=g-v2g-j1&amp;aql=&amp;gs_sm=e&amp;gs_upl=17660l18285l0l18356l3l2l0l0l0l0l121l189l1.1l2l0&amp;bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.,cf.osb&amp;fp=f5cf4eca40f954d8&amp;biw=1276&amp;bih=706"><span class="s1">'Impostor syndrome CS' Google results</span></a>). It's when you feel that even though you've done well so far, you don't belong because you're not actually that talented. You worry that eventually you'll mess up and other people find you out as a failure. Besides the mental stress of having to do everything right, it can cause problems because the fear of failure means you're less likely to challenge yourself or try new things. Often, just recognizing it as a false pattern of thinking helps -- people think you're good because you really are and you don't need to be perfect, so see what happens if you act 20% more confident than you are and take risks. Also, realize that you don't need to be the absolute best, and it doesn't matter if other people at Stanford have a "head start" -- Stanford CS is world-class, there are way more jobs and opportunities and useful applications of CS than people to fill them, and plenty of successful people such as <a href="http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_40/b3953093.htm">Marissa Mayer</a> learned computer science in college.</p>
+<h3>Next Steps</h3>
-<h3>Resources</h3>
+<p class="p1">If you liked CS106A, think about taking the next small step and checking out CS106B to gauge your interest in programming, or CS103 to learn the foundations of CS theory. You don't need to be totally certain that CS is your one and only destiny -- if you like the creative way of thinking and problem-solving, keeping trying things out and exploring, and see where it takes you. </p>
-<p class="p1">To learn about company tours, meals with professors, and CS events, join <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/considering_cs"><span class="s1">the considering_cs list</span></a>. You can almost certainly get an internship after CS107, and it's worth trying after CS106B. For information on jobs and internships, explore the <a href="http://forum.stanford.edu/careers/recruiting.php"><span class="s1">Computer Forum</span></a>, sign up for the <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/recruiting"><span class="s1">recruiting list</span></a>, and show up to career fairs with a resume. Also, consider <a href="https://cs198.stanford.edu/cs106/Apply.aspx"><span class="s1">applying to section-lead</span></a> (and re-applying!) after 106B -- you'll learn a lot, gain experience and confidence teaching, make a difference, and become part of a great community.</p>
+<h2>Resources</h3>
-<h3>Next Steps</h3>
+<h3>Opportunities at Stanford</h3>
-<p class="p1">If you liked CS106A, think about taking the next small step and checking out CS106B to gauge your interest in programming, or CS103 to learn the foundations of CS theory. You don't need to be totally certain that CS is your one and only destiny -- if you like the creative way of thinking and problem-solving, keeping trying things out and exploring, and see where it takes you. </p>
+<p class="p1">To learn about company tours, meals with professors, and CS events, join <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/considering_cs"><span class="s1">the considering_cs list</span></a>. You can almost certainly get an internship after CS107, and it's worth trying after CS106B. For information on jobs and internships, explore the <a href="http://forum.stanford.edu/careers/recruiting.php"><span class="s1">Computer Forum</span></a>, sign up for the <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/recruiting"><span class="s1">recruiting list</span></a>, and show up to career fairs with a resume. Also, consider <a href="https://cs198.stanford.edu/cs106/Apply.aspx"><span class="s1">applying to section-lead</span></a> (and re-applying!) after 106B -- you'll learn a lot, gain experience and confidence teaching, make a difference, and become part of a great community.</p>
<h3>Flexibility in the CS Major</h3>
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