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Reformatted chart so that it fits into longevity article

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1 parent f329780 commit 3a6e3f4b4d93434b985c49d469891193874e57c4 @jamiely committed Mar 22, 2012
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@@ -1,7 +1,9 @@
svg {
background: #fff;
- width: 960px;
+ width: 800px;
height: 500px;
+ position: relative;
+ left: -200px;
}
#countries path {
View
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
var dataRetirement;
var xy = d3.geo.equirectangular()
- .scale(900),
+ .scale(600),
path = d3.geo.path().projection(xy);
var redraw = function() {
@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@
};
var renderRetirementAge = function(useOfficial) {
- d3.json("eff_v_official_retirement_age.json", function(json) {
+ d3.json(dataDirectory + "eff_v_official_retirement_age.json", function(json) {
data = json;
dataRetirement = json;
var dataValues = d3.values(data);
@@ -390,6 +390,11 @@ <h2 style="padding:0px; margin:15px 5px 10px 10px;">An End to the 'Golden Years'
<p>In the United States, the trend toward working longer is actually a throwback to earlier times. "The new retirement is really the old retirement," says <a href="http://www.wharton.upenn.edu/faculty/mitchelo.cfm">Olivia S. Mitchell</a>, professor of insurance and risk management and executive director of the <a href="http://www.pensionresearchcouncil.org/">Pension Research Council</a> at Wharton. For most of the first half of the 20<sup>th</sup> century, "everyone worked as long as they could.... Sitting around and doing nothing was an alien concept." </p>
<p>This work-until-you-drop mentality prevailed before Social Security and corporate pension plans began to provide retirees with income for as long as they lived. That was not expected to be very long when Social Security became law in the Great Depression, since the average life expectancy was little more than 61 years in the country at the time -- compared with over 78 years today. Social Security was initially limited to commercial and industrial employees and became universal in the 1950s.</p>
<p>By then, corporate defined-benefit pensions had strengthened the retirement safety net. They, too, provided income for life and were launched during World War II to recruit workers to strategic industries such as shipbuilding and auto manufacturing. Such pensions were in lieu of wage hikes, since wages and prices were frozen at the time. "That was what gave impetus to the pension movement," says Mitchell.</p>
+
+<iframe src="http://33.33.33.33:8500/sweet-vis/" width="600" height="500">
+</iframe>
+
+
<p><strong>Endless Weekends</strong></p>
<p>The new income security promised a new stage of life that marketers dubbed "the golden years," in which retirement was seen as an endless weekend. Real estate developers seized on the concept to build retirement communities featuring golf courses and other leisure activities, while travel agencies packaged cruises and tours for the senior set. Work itself was often viewed as "something horrible that you did until you got enough money to retire," says Kevin Coyne, managing director of The Coyne Partnership, a consulting firm in Atlanta, Georgia, that has studied retirement trends.</p>
<p>Changes in the workforce reflected this attitude. From 1948 until the early 1990s, the proportion of working men aged 65 and over fell from nearly 50% of that age group to less than 20%, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The proportion of older working women remained relatively constant during that period at about 10% of those aged 65 and over.</p>
@@ -726,4 +731,4 @@ <h3 style="text-align:center;">Knowledge@Wharton Categories</h3>
</div>
- <iframe style="border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; border-image: initial; width: 1px; height: 1px; display: none; " src="./An End to the 'Golden Years' Increasing Longevity Changes the Work-leisure Equation - Knowledge@Wharton_files/beacon.html"></iframe><div class="idc-loaded" id="IDCommentLoadingDiv" style="display: block; "></div></body></html>
+ <iframe style="border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; border-image: initial; width: 1px; height: 1px; display: none; " src="./An End to the 'Golden Years' Increasing Longevity Changes the Work-leisure Equation - Knowledge@Wharton_files/beacon.html"></iframe><div class="idc-loaded" id="IDCommentLoadingDiv" style="display: block; "></div></body></html>

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