A toolkit for creating and deploying Python code to AWS Lambda
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README.md

lambda-tools

Build Status

A toolkit for creating and deploying Python code to AWS Lambda

This is a simple Python package that will let you build and deploy AWS Lambda functions quickly and easily.

It supports the creation of multiple lambdas from a single codebase.

Lambda definition file

Create a file called aws-lambda.yml in the root directory of your project. This will contain your lambda function's definitions.

Sample aws-lambda.yml file:

# Version number is required and should be set to 1.
version: 1

functions:
  hello_world:
    runtime: python3.6

    # The build section is required
    build:
      # source is required
      source: src/hello_world

      # Optional settings
      compile_dependencies: false
      package: build/hello_world.zip
      use_docker: false

      requirements:
        - file: requirements.txt

    # The deploy section is optional if you want to use another mechanism
    # (e.g. Terraform) to deploy your function to AWS Lambda
    deploy:
      # These settings are required
      handler: hello.handler
      role: service-role/NONTF-lambda

      # Optional settings
      description: A basic Hello World handler
      memory_size: 128
      package: build/hello_world.zip
      region: eu-west-1
      timeout: 3

      dead_letter_config:
        target:
          sqs: SQS queue name; alternatively, an SNS topic can be specified.

      environment:
        variables:
          foo: bar
          # Empty value here will cause the environment variable to be passed through
          baz:

      kms_key:
        name: aws/lambda

      tags:
        Account: Marketing
        Application: Newsletters

      tracing_config:
        mode: PassThrough | Active

      vpc_config:
        name: My VPC
        subnets:
          - name: Public subnet
          - name: Private subnet
        security_groups:
          - name: allow_database

Definitiion file reference

Your aws-lambda.yml file starts with a number indicating which version of the configuration schema you are using. This should be version 1.

The functions section then contains your function definitions. The name of each entry within this section gives the name of your function.

Each function contains two sub-sections.

The runtime parameter

The runtime parameter is optional and defaults to python3.6. It indicates which language runtime is used by the function.

  • Note that while you may specify any language supported by AWS, only python3.6 (the default) is currently fully supported by lambda_tools. Support for other AWS-supported runtimes is planned.

The build section

The build section is required. It tells ltools where to find the source files for your lambda and how to build it. The parameters are as follows:

  • source (Required): The folder containing your function's source code. This is specified relative to the aws-lambda.yml file.

  • requirements: A list of requirements files specifying the Python packages to be downloaded from PyPI for inclusion with your function.

  • compile_dependencies: Compile the Python files in dependent packages into .pyc files. Default: false.

    • By default, .py files in your dependencies are not compiled into .pyc files. This may increase the startup time of your lambda function, especially if the number of dependencies that you have specified is large but it does mean that the same build will produce exactly the same binary. This is important, for example, if you are using ltools in conjunction with Terraform, which looks for changes in your build output.
  • package: The filename where your function's bundled package should be saved, ready to upload to AWS. This is relative to the aws-lambda.yml file.

    • If not specified, it will be saved into a zip file next to the folder containing your source code.
  • use_docker: Build the lambda in a Docker container. Default: false.

    • You will normally not need to use Docker, unless you are building your lambda function on OSX or Windows and some of your dependencies are written partly in C. If you get "Invalid ELF header" errors in AWS after uploading your lambda to AWS, change this setting to true. For more information see this article.

The deploy section

The deploy section is optional. You only need it if you are going to be using ltools itself to deploy your function to AWS Lambda. If you are using a different mechanism, such as Terraform, for deployment, you can omit it.

The parameters are as follows:

  • handler (Required): The function's entry point into your code. For Python, this is specified in the format module.handler.

  • role (Required): The name of the IAM role attached to the lambda function. This determines who or what can run your function, as well as what resources it can access.

  • source (Required): The folder containing your function's source code. This is specified relative to the aws-lambda.yml file.

  • description: A short description of what your function does.

  • memory_size: The amount of memory that your function can use at runtime, in gigabytes. Must be a multiple of 64 gigabytes. Default: 128.

  • region: The AWS region into which your function is to be deployed.

    • If not specified, it will be taken from either the environment variables or the configuration information that you have set using aws configure.
  • timeout: The maximum time, in seconds, that your function is allowed to run before being terminated. Default: 3 seconds.

  • dead_letter_config: Configures your lambda function's dead letter queue, to which notifications of failed invocations are sent. This can be either an SNS topic or an SQS queue, and it can be specified either by name or by ARN.

    • It can be configured in one of the following ways:
      dead_letter_config:
        target_arn: (the ARN of your queue or topic)
    
      dead_letter_config:
        target:
          sns: (the name of your SNS topic)
    
      dead_letter_config:
        target:
          sqs: (the name of your SQS queue)
  • environment: The environment variables to be passed to your function. It is configured as follows:

      environment:
        variables:
          VARIABLE: some value
          PASSTHROUGH_VARIABLE:

    Variables whose value is left blank will be passed through to the function configuration from the environment which invokes ltools.

  • kms_key: The KMS key used to encrypt the environment variables. This can be specified either by name or by ARN:

      kms_key:
        name: aws/lambda
    
      kms_key:
        arn: "arn:aws:kms:eu-west-1:123456789012:key:01234567-89ab-cdef-0123-456789abcdef"

    If no key is specified, the default key, aws/lambda, will be used.

  • tags: The tags to be assigned to your lambda function. For example:

      tags:
        Account: marketing
        Application: newsletters
  • tracing_config: The tracing settings for your application. This contains a single argument, mode:

      tracing_config:
        mode: PassThrough

    mode can be set to either PassThrough or Active. If PassThrough, Lambda will only trace the request from an upstream service if it contains a tracing header with sampled=1. If Active, Lambda will respect any tracing header it receives from an upstream service. If no tracing header is received, Lambda will call X-Ray for a tracing decision.

  • vpc_config: Add this section if you want your lambda function to access your VPC. You will need to specify subnets and security groups:

      vpc_config:
        subnets:
          - id: subnet-12345678
          - name: public-subnet
          - another-subnet
        security_groups:
          - id: sg-12345678
          - name: some-group
          - another-group

    Security groups and subnets can be specified either by ID or by name. As a shortcut, you can omit name: when specifying it by name.

    If you have two or more security groups or subnets with the same name in different VPCs, you will also need to specify the ID or name of the VPC in order to disambiguate them:

      vpc_config:
        name: My VPC
        subnets:
          - id: subnet-12345678
          - name: public-subnet
          - another-subnet
        security_groups:
          - id: sg-12345678
          - name: some-group
          - another-group

Command line instructions

  • ltools build: builds some or all of the lambda functions specified in the aws-lambda.yml file in the current directory.
  • ltools deploy: deploys some or all of the lambda functions specified in the aws-lambda.yml file in the current directory.
  • ltools list: lists the lambda functions defined in your aws-lambda.yml file.
  • ltools version: displays the version number and exits.