Provides core classes for generating SQL at runtime.
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
Latest commit deadcb3 Apr 27, 2017

README.md

SQLGeneration

Provides core classes for generating SQL at runtime.

Download using NuGet: SQLGeneration

Recent Updates

Please view the Recent Updates Wiki to learn the latest news.

Overview

With all the ORMs out there today, it's amazing how many systems have their own micro-ORMs. We've all been there. We start writing SQL by hand and using core ADO.NET classes. The better of us try to use parameters whenever possible; others just concatenate strings. Even those virtuous enough to stick with parameters eventually run into problems... an IN filter, for example, or a screen that allows users to sort and filter columns.

At this point even really experienced programmers start to sweat. "I can build my IN filter, because all the values are integers... right?", or "I just have to build my WHERE and ORDER BY clauses, I just have to remember to check for zero items first..." This is where the trouble starts for a lot of projects. It's very easy to introduce a bug that makes your code vulnerable to malicious users, especially if you have entry-level developers working on your data layer. On a much less serious note, most developers forget simple things like handling empty lists, escaping strings, handling NULL values and making sure there's whitespace where it's needed.

SQLGeneration is meant to alleviate some of the headache involved in building SQL in you code. It handles all of the formatting issues for you, so you can concentrate on what your SQL is supposed to be doing. Whether you're just handling that one troublesome SQL statement or you've decided to build your own micro-ORM, SQLGeneration will make your job easier.

It sports an extremely flexible object model that supports generating fairly standard SQL for different vendors. It doesn't support everything, of course, but it covers a lot of ground for everyday development, especially for SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL, PostgresSQL and even MS Access. Support for new features are added regularly.

A Simple SELECT

Here is a simple example that selects some columns from a table:

// SELECT CustomerId, FirstName, LastName, Created FROM Customer WHERE CustomerId = @CustomerId
SelectBuilder builder = new SelectBuilder();

AliasedSource customer = builder.AddTable(new Table("Customer"));

Column customerId = customer.Column("CustomerId");
Column firstName = customer.Column("FirstName");
Column lastName = customer.Column("LastName");
Column created = customer.Column("Created");
builder.AddProjection(customerId);
builder.AddProjection(firstName);
builder.AddProjection(lastName);
builder.AddProjection(created);

Placeholder parameter = new Placeholder("@CustomerId");
EqualToFilter filter = new EqualToFilter(customerId, parameter);
builder.AddWhere(filter);

Formatter formatter = new Formatter();
string commandText = formatter.GetCommandText(builder);

As you can see from this example, generating commands requires a lot of typing. Most of the time, this type of code would be replaced with an automated process. For instance, you might loop through DataColumns in a DataTable or use reflection to visit Attributes in a class to configure the builder.

Note the use of the Placeholder class in the example. Placeholder allows you to place arbitrary values in the SQL statement. You could use this, for instance, to create an number with an exponent (new Placeholder("6.02214078E23")). It's more common use is to indicate parameters, like in the example. It's really a shortcut when you want to avoid the object model. Just keep in mind that invalid values will cause errors.

SELECT for the Lazy and Arthritic

If you had to do that much typing for every SELECT statement, you'd probably just stick to concatenating strings. Not everyone is building an ORM, so I made it possible to build command builders from plain SQL. Here's the same example, simplified:

string commandText = "SELECT CustomerId, FirstName, LastName, Created FROM Customer";
CommandBuilder commandBuilder = new CommandBuilder();
SelectBuilder builder = (SelectBuilder)commandBuilder.GetCommand(commandText);

Column customerId = builder.Source["Customer"].Column("CustomerId");
Placeholder parameter = new Placeholder("@CustomerId");
EqualToFilter filter = new EqualToFilter(customerId, parameter);
builder.AddWhere(filter);

Formatter formatter = new Formatter();
commandText = formatter.GetCommandText(builder);

License

This is free and unencumbered software released into the public domain.

Anyone is free to copy, modify, publish, use, compile, sell, or distribute this software, either in source code form or as a compiled binary, for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, and by any means.

In jurisdictions that recognize copyright laws, the author or authors of this software dedicate any and all copyright interest in the software to the public domain. We make this dedication for the benefit of the public at large and to the detriment of our heirs and successors. We intend this dedication to be an overt act of relinquishment in perpetuity of all present and future rights to this software under copyright law.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

For more information, please refer to https://unlicense.org