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README

This is a quickie pair of categories on UIAlertView and UIActionSheet which enables you to use blocks to handle the button selection instead of implementing a delegate.

HOW IT WORKS

Using UIAlertView as the main example here, instead of calling the traditional -initWithTitle:message:delegate:cancelButtonTitle:otherButtonTitles: initializer, you call the new initializer: -initWithTitle:message:cancelButtonItem:otherButtonItems:. This works just like the traditional initializer, except instead of using strings for the buttons, it takes instances of RIButtonItem's. This is a class also defined as part of this framework which simply encapsulates the button label and the action block to execute when that button is tapped. The last argument to the initializer is variadic, just like the traditional initializer, so it must be nil terminated.

The action blocks are of type RISimpleAction, which is typedef'd to be a block as follows:

typedef void (^RISimpleAction)();

This is just a simple block which takes no arguments and returns nothing.

The RIButtonItem class also provides a convenience method which returns an autoreleased item called, conveniently enough, +item. If you don't specify an action, the button will still show, but won't do anything when tapped other than dismiss the dialog. This is pretty common with cancel buttons, so another convenience method called +itemWithLabel: allows you to quickly create an item that has no action.

Under the covers, the category takes the button items you pass in, and it stores them as an associated object with the UIAlertView itself. It then initializes a traditional UIAlertView, setting itself as the delegate. When the UIAlertView gets the -alertView:didDismissWithButtonIndex: delegate method called, it pulls out the button items, looks up the one associated with the tapped button, and executes the block associated with that button.

One little bit of weirdness you may be curious about is this: In the initializer, it retains itself. The reason it does this is because the expectation is that you'll basically fire and forget this. I didn't want to have to hold onto an instance variable for this guy or anything, and I wasn't sure if the didDismiss method was called before or after the alertview was removed from the view hierarchy and thus, possibly deallocated. Since the UIAlertView itself is it's own delegate, if it gets deallocated before the didDismiss method is called, it would crash, and we don't want that. By retaining self, we don't need to worry about it. The only concern then is that we have to remember to release self in the delegate method, which we do. If anyone can confirm or deny that this code is required, I'd welcome the discussion. Does retaining self make me feel dirty? Yes. And naughty... oh yeah... so naughty... ;)

HOW TO USE IT

Typically, you'll create items that represent the buttons and the actions to take when they are tapped. For example imagine a dialog box confirming deletion of an item:

RIButtonItem *cancelItem = [RIButtonItem item];
cancelItem.label = @"No";
cancelItem.action = ^
{
    // this is the code that will be executed when the user taps "No"
    // this is optional... if you leave the action as nil, it won't do anything
    // but here, I'm showing a block just to show that you can use one if you want to.
};

RIButtonItem *deleteItem = [RIButtonItem item];
deleteItem.label = @"Yes";
deleteItem.action = ^
{
    // this is the code that will be executed when the user taps "Yes"
    // delete the object in question...
    [context deleteObject:theObject];
};

The label property on the button items is the text that will be displayed in the button.

Once you've created these, you simply initialize your UIAlertView using the initializer, passing your button items accordingly:

UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Delete This Item?" 
                                                    message:@"Are you sure you want to delete this really important thing?" 
                                           cancelButtonItem:cancelItem 
                                           otherButtonItems:deleteItem, nil];
[alertView show];
[alertView release];

Again, this is designed to be fire and forget, so you initialize it, show it, and release it. It'll take care of cleaning up after itself.

That's it!

The UIActionSheet category works virtually the same as the UIAlertView. Just check out the header for the initializer you need to use. It's very straightforward.

LICENSE

Copyright (C) 2011 by Random Ideas, LLC

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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