a qmail queue manipulation program geared towards the viewing and safe modification of the contents in a qmail queue.
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README

qmqtool v1.15
Copyright 2003-2016 Jeremy Kister 
# (wow, has it been 13 years of qmail?)
http://github.com/jkister/qmqtool

qmqtool is a qmail queue manipulation program geared towards the
viewing and safe modification of the contents in a qmail queue.

qmqtool may be copied and distributed under the terms found in the
Perl "Artistic License".  A copy of this license may be found in the
standard Perl distribution, or in the file "Artistic".

please report all bugs to: qmqtool-devel @t jeremykister.com.


Installation:

See INSTALL


Notes:

This tool utilizes your system's grep command (among others).  Note
that GNU's grep is much faster than Solaris's grep, so you should
consider installing it, as your searches (with -f) will be about five
times faster.  GNU grep can also use a pipe as a logical OR (e.g.
qmqtool -f 'this|that').

qmqtool supports many arguments, each which must be used separately
unless specifically allowed.  All syntax is described with qmqtool -h.

qmqtool -[lLRT] [-Q]
	show queue information: 
	l for all
	L for messages with local recipients
	R for messages with remote recipients
	T for messages not yet preprocessed (todo)

	qmqtool starts by stating the message number, followed by a space,
	an open-parenthesis, the message number, the string 'remote' or
	'local' (representing where the message is to be delivered),
	followed by a close-parenthesis.  It continues displaying
	"Envelope Sender", "Envelope Recipient", "From", "To",
	"Subject", and "Date", if it can.  Lastly, it displays the
	size of the message, in the highest reasonable unit, followed
	by an empty line.  Note that using the -l option does not
	include information about messages not yet preprocessed.  After all
	messages are displayed, it then prints a few statistics
	similar to running qmqtool -s.

	adding -Q will print message numbers for the given message type,
	separated by comma.  will print 0 if there are no messages.

qmqtool -f 'STRING'
	will print a comma separated list of message numbers who's
	messages contain STRING.  Be careful to quote STRING, as spaces
	are treated as possible new arguments on the command line and
	special characters (like PIPE) may be interpreted by your shell.

	note that STRING is a regexp; characters such as ^ ? . + () |
	must be escaped appropriately.

	some perlish-regex is supported.  for example, valid usage of -f:
	string
	"string[14]|string2"
	/string[13]/i                   # case insensitive
	'/^From: someone@example.com/i' # case insensitive
	'/^astring$|^bstring[13]/'

qmqtool -oN
	will print a comma seperated list of messages numbers who have
	been in the queue N or longer hours.

qmqtool -xN
	will print extended information on message number N.  format
	identical to -l.
	
	N may be a single message number, or multiple messages separated
	by comma.  instead of N, you may specify -f 'STRING' and/or -o AGE.

	qmqtool -x -f 'football' -o 5
	will show extended info on all messages containing the word	
	"football" that are more than 5 hours old.

qmqtool -s [-Q]
	will print a counter with a breif explenation for messages with
	local recipients, remote recipients, non-preprocessed messages,
	and total messages - in that order, one per line. 

	Adding -Q will silence the description of each value and will
	only print the actual values, one per line.  This is very useful
	for graphing your queue via cricket/mrtg/cacti, or, more
	importantly, monitoring your queue, with Argus.

	Note that the total value may be more than the sum of the local,
	remote, and non-preprocessed values.

	check the contrib/argus/README and contrib/cricket/README
	for more information.

qmqtool -dN
	Will delete message number N.  N can be a single queued message
	number or it can be multiple message numbers separated by comma.

	Deleting messages is rude compared to expiring them.  When you
	delete a message while qmail-send is running, qmail doesnt know
	that the message has disappeared, and you'll start getting log
	messages about it being unhappy.  a restart of qmail-send is
	necessary to hush the log.

qmqtool -d -f 'STRING'
	This will behave the same as qmqtool -dN, except that instead of
	specifying the message ids, you specify a string.  For example:
	qmqtool -d -f 'Football Game'
	will delete all messages with 'Football Game' in it.
	
	Note this does not remind you to restart qmail-send, unless you
	also specify -V (for verbose).

	If used with -o N, will only show messages both older than N
	hours, and containing STRING.

qmqtool -d -o N
	This will behave the same as qmqtool -dN, except that instead of
	specifying a message id, you specify age (in hours).  For example,
	to delete all messages that have been queued for 18 hours:
	qmqtool -d -o 18

qmqtool -c
	using the chart listed in qmail's INTERNALS file, qmqtool will
	try it's best to ensure each file in your queue is in a
	consistent state.  Since the entire queue changes so rapidly,
	the qmail-send and qmail-smtpd programs must be stopped before
	asking qmqtool to check queue integrity.  Once stopped, qmqtool
	will display found fragments of emails left behind from a most
	likely clueless admin, who tried to delete messages directly
	from the queue.  qmqtool could stop and start the queue
	processing program for you, but it's author decided that it's
	your job.

qmqtool -r
	will remove all fragments of messages deemed rogue by qmqtool
	while using the -c option.

qmqtool -i
	will show how many messages are queued per source ip address.  this
	pays attention only to the server that gave the message to us.
	useful for tracking down an abuser.

	will report '127.0.0.2' when qmqtool can not find who sent us
	the message.  this usually happens when the message was
	injected into the queue manually, ie via qmail-inject. 

	if your configuration uses front-end smtp servers who send their
	messages to a set of backend servers, this option would not be
	very helpful, as qmqtool would report the sending IP as the front-
	end server.  To overcome this, you can supply an argument to -n,
	specifing what smtp hop to pay attention to -- for example:

	'qmqtool -i -n2' will sort the messages based on the second to
	last server to handle the message.

	use -V to display a third column containing message numbers that
	this host has queued.

qmqtool -S
	similar to -i, except will show you how many bytes are
	queued per destination ip address.

	note that the listed amount of bytes is not necessarily the amount
	of bytes stored on your disk; a single 200 byte email sent to 10
	envelope recipients will show up as 2000 bytes.

qmqtool -eN
	will expire message N, where N is the queued message number.  N may
	be a message number, or multiple message numbers separated by a
	comma.  If the specified message is found non-preprocessed (todo),
	qmqtool will warn you that it is not expirable.

qmqtool -e -f 'STRING'
	This will behave the same as qmqtool -eN, except that instead of
	specifying a message id, you specify a string.  For example:
 	qmqtool -e -f 'Football Game'
	will expire all messages containing the string 'Football Game'.

	If used with -o N, will only expire messages both older than N
	hours, and containing STRING.

qmqtool -e -o N
	This will behave the same as qmqtool -eN, except that instead of
	specifying a message id, you specify age (in hours).  For example,
	to expire all messages that have been queued for 18 hours:
	qmqtool -e -o 18
 
qmqtool -uN
	This option is sometimes referred to as "Re-Queueing"

	will un-expire message N, where N is a queued message number.  N
	may be a message number, or multiple message numbers separated by a
	comma.  This option may not be used with messages not yet
	preprocessed.

	This may be useful when you never want a particular message to
	be bounced after the default 7* day period.  For example, if
	you are queuing mail for someone's currently off-line server,
	you probably wouldn't want to bounce their mail after 7* days:
	you'd want to keep it for them as long as you could, so that
	when their server regains Internet access, the mail can be
	delivered.

	Although you could be using AutoTURN for this, it can be
	achieved be using qmail itself.  Supposing the site's domain
	name you are queuing for is "example.com", simply run
	qmqtool -u -f "example\.com"
	on a daily (or similar) basis, which will first find all
	message numbers that contain the string "example.com" and
	will then set the modification time to now: giving them an
	extra 7* day life span in the queue.

	* the default queuelifetime is 7 days.  we check to ensure.

qmqtool -u -f 'STRING'
	This will behave the same as qmqtool -uN, except that instead of
	specifying a message id, you specify a string.  For example:
 	qmqtool -u -f 'Football Game'
	will unexpire all messages containing the string 'Football Game'.

	If used with -o N, will only unexpire messages both older than N
	hours, and containing STRING.

qmqtool -u -o N
	This will behave the same as qmqtool -uN, except that instead of
	specifying a message id, you specify age (in hours).  For example,
	to unexpire all messages that have been queued for 18 hours:
	qmqtool -u -o 18

qmqtool -E[A|R|L]
	will expire [A]ll, [R]emote, or [L]ocal messages.  I don't know
	when this this function would be useful, but can think of lots of
	times it'd be dangerous -- beware.

qmqtool -U[A|R|L]
	the same as qmqtool -E, except that it will unexpire (Re-Queue)
	messages.  Very useful when you've just typed qmqtool -EA, and
	shouted "d'oh!".

	This function could also be useful if your qmail server's sole
	purpose is a backup mail server:  you don't have to bother
	looking for strings and un-expiring them individually, rather,
	simply keep everything in the queue.

qmqtool -vN
	will show you the first 100 lines of queued message N.  Limiting
	the viewed message to 100 lines is good, because it trims off the
	otherwise [hundreds of] thousands of useless encoded lines of
	Microsoft worms.

	use -w in conjunction with -v to view the whole message (e.g.
	qmqtool -wvN (or qmqtool -w -v N).

qmqtool -B(b|r)
	will either (b)ackup the current queue in /var/qmail/queue/ to
	/var/qmail/queue.backup/, or will (r)estore the queue in
	/var/qmail/queue.backup/ to /var/qmail/queue/.
	
	Note that qmail-send/smtpd must be stopped for this process.  Also
	beware that the restore action does not replace the current
	queue, rather, it appends to it.  The queue layout in
	/var/qmail/queue must be correct before either backing it up
	or restoring to it.  The easiest way to ensure this is to run
	'make setup check' from the qmail-1.03 source directory.  Most
	inconsitencies in queue structure will be backed up or
	restored, as is.