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Usepackage Environment Manager
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.gitignore
AUTHORS
COPYING
ChangeLog
INSTALL
Makefile.am
NEWS
README
bootstrap.sh
configure.ac
grammar.c
grammar.h
grammar.y
linked_list.c
linked_list.h
match.c
package.h
scanner.c
scanner.l
use.1.in
use.bsh.in
use.csh.in
use.ksh.in
usepackage.1.in
usepackage.c
usepackage.conf
utils.c
utils.h

README

Usepackage Environment Manager
Copyright (C) 1995-2015  Jonathan Hogg  <me@jonathanhogg.com>
   
This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
(at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, 
but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software 
Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA


				Usepackage

usepackage is an environment management program. It is based on the principle
of "packages" that are "used". When a package is used, the information
necessary to invoke it is drawn into the environment of the shell. A summary
of how to setup and use the system is given below; see the manual page for 
more information.

Using usepackage:
-----------------

Add one of the following lines to your shell rc file (modify depending on
where you installed usepackage):

 * for csh/tcsh:	source /usr/local/share/usepackage/use.csh
 * for sh/zsh/bash:	source /usr/local/share/usepackage/use.bsh
 * for ksh:		. /usr/local/share/usepackage/use.ksh

Then invoke `use' to add packages to your environment like:

   use <package1> [<package2>...]

For example, in the shell rc file:

   use gnu standard X11

Note that usepackage is case-insensitive, so `x11' is also acceptable in the 
above example.

The `use' command can be called at any time to use another package, for
example:

   % latex foo
   latex: Command not found.
   % use tex
   % latex foo
   This is TeX, Version 3.1415 (C version 6.1)
   ...

If the requested package is not available for your platform then a warning
message will be given of the form:

   % use java
   usepackage: no match for package `java' on this host.

These messages can be suppressed with the `-s' flag (for instance if you log 
onto platforms for which certain packages that you use are not available):

   % use -s java

You can obtain a usage summary by typing `use' with no arguments and a list
of available packages with:

   % use -l

   usepackage 1.9, Copyright (C) 1995-2015  Jonathan Hogg

   Available packages are:

      none - empty paths
      dot - add current directory to PATH (possible security hole)
      [...]

A Recommendation:
-----------------

As usepackage makes it very easy to add packages into your environment at the 
command line, it is worth not adding all the packages you might ever need in 
your shell rc file. Instead add only the packages you commonly use and add 
rarer ones before you run them. For example, if you rarely use latex it makes 
no sense to keep it resident in your path, following the example above it is 
simple to bring it in before you use it. This will keep your path short and 
speed-up shell startup times. In particular, some brain-dead shells have 
major problems with a very long path. Another advantage of doing this is
that the `man' command works much better with a short MANPATH variable and
even better if the pages you request are near the head of the MANPATH (which
is the case when a package is added at the command line).

Customising packages:
---------------------

The file `usepackage.conf' contains the information about each package. This 
file contains comments explaining its format. Per-user packages can be added by 
creating the file `.packages' in your home directory with the same format as 
the main packages file (assuming the `include' line in `usepackage.conf' is
kept). The syntax is also documented in the `usepackage' manual page.


				REPORTING BUGS

If you find a bug in usepackage, please let me know about it. You can email me
at <me@jonathanhogg.com>.

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