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jQuery Migrate Plugin - Warning Messages

NOTE: This page lists the messages for jQuery Migrate 3.0. If you are using an earlier version, see the documentation on the 1.x-stable branch.

To allow developers to identify and fix compatibility issues when migrating older jQuery code, the development (uncompressed) version of the plugin generates console warning messages whenever any of its functionality is called. The messages only appear once on the console for each unique message.

In most cases these messages are simply warnings; code should continue to work properly with later versions of jQuery as long as the jQuery Migrate plugin is used, but we recommend changing the code where possible to eliminate warnings so that the plugin does not need to be used.

The production (compressed) version of the plugin does not generate warnings. To continue using jQuery code that has compatibility issues without making any changes and without console messages, simply include the production version in the file rather than the development version. See the README for download instructions.

All messages generated by this plugin start with the text "JQMIGRATE" for easy identification. The warning messages, causes, and remediation instructions are listed below. Items listed as deprecated and removed must be changed before the code will work properly without the Migrate plugin. Items listed as only deprecated are still supported by the current version but no longer considered a good practice, and may be removed in the future.

JQMIGRATE: Migrate is installed, version X

JQMIGRATE: Migrate is installed with logging active, version X

This is not a warning, but a console log message the plugin shows when it first loads to indicate whether warnings will be shown on the console when appropriate. As of version 1.4.0 this message is also shown with production builds. The use jQuery Migrate in production has performance impacts and can complicate debugging as it modifies the normal behavior of the version of jQuery being used.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery 3.0.0+ REQUIRED

Cause: The page does not have a version of jQuery installed, or is using a version of jQuery older than 3.0.0. The jQuery Migrate plugin is not intended to be used for those cases. Any messages that follow this one may not be accurate, or the page may not run properly at all.

Solution: See the README for more information on usage and upgrading from older versions.

JQMIGRATE: Migrate plugin loaded multiple times

Cause: The plugin detected that some version of jQuery Migrate is already loaded. Loading multiple versions can cause unpredictable behavior.

Solution: Remove all but the latest version of the jQuery Migrate plugin. See the README for more information on usage and upgrading from older versions.

JQMIGRATE: Attribute selector with '#' must be quoted

JQMIGRATE: Attribute selector with '#' was not fixed

Cause: Selectors such as a[href=#main] are not valid CSS syntax because the value contains special characters that are not quoted. Until jQuery 1.11.3/2.1.4 this was accepted, but the behavior is non-standard and was never documented. In later versions this selector throws an error. In some cases with complex selectors, Migrate may not attempt a repair. In those cases a fatal error will be logged on the console and you will need to fix the selector manually.

Solution: Put quotes around any attribute values that have special characters, e.g. a[href="#main"]. The warning message contains the selector that caused the problem, use that to find the selector in the source files.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery is not compatible with Quirks Mode

Cause: A browser runs in "quirks mode" when the HTML document does not have a <!doctype ...> as its first non-blank line, or when the doctype in the file is invalid. This mode causes the browser to emulate 1990s-era (HTML3) behavior. In Internet Explorer, it also causes many high-performance APIs to be hidden in order to better emulate ancient browsers. jQuery has never been compatible with, or tested in, quirks mode.

Solution: Put a valid doctype in the document and ensure that the document is rendering in standards mode. The simplest valid doctype is the HTML5 one, which we highly recommend: <!doctype html> . The jQuery Migrate plugin does not attempt to fix issues related to quirks mode.

JQMIGRATE: jQXHR.success is deprecated and removed

JQMIGRATE: jQXHR.error is deprecated and removed

JQMIGRATE: jQXHR.complete is deprecated and removed

Cause: The .success(), .error(), and .complete() methods of the jQXHR object returned from jQuery.ajax() have been deprecated since jQuery 1.8 and were removed in jQuery 3.0.

Solution: Replace the use of these methods with the standard Deferred methods: .success() becomes .done(), .error() becomes .fail(), and .complete() becomes .always().

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.error() is deprecated

Cause: The $().error() method was used to attach an "error" event to an element but has been removed in 1.9 to reduce confusion with the $.error() method which is unrelated and has not been deprecated. It also serves to discourage the temptation to use $(window).error() which does not work because window.onerror does not follow standard event handler conventions. The $().error() method was removed in jQuery 3.0.

Solution: Change any use of $().error(fn) to $().on("error", fn).

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.load() is deprecated

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.unload() is deprecated

Cause: The .load() and .unload() event methods attach a "load" and "unload" event, respectively, to an element. They were deprecated in 1.9 and removed in 3.0 to reduce confusion with the AJAX-related .load() method that loads HTML fragments and which has not been deprecated. Note that these two methods are used almost exclusively with a jQuery collection consisting of only the window element. Also note that attaching an "unload" or "beforeunload" event on a window via any means can impact performance on some browsers because it disables the document cache (bfcache). For that reason we strongly advise against it.

Solution: Change any use of $().load(fn) to $().on("load", fn) and $().unload(fn) to $().on("unload", fn).

JQMIGRATE: deferred.pipe() is deprecated

Cause: The .pipe() method on a jQuery.Deferred object was deprecated as of jQuery 1.8, when the .then() method was changed to perform the same function.

Solution: In most cases it is sufficient to change all occurrences of .pipe() to .then(). Ensure that you aren't relying on context/state propagation (e.g., using this) or synchronous callback invocation, which were dropped from .then() for Promises/A+ interoperability as of jQuery 3.0.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fx.interval is deprecated

Cause: As of jQuery 3.0 the jQuery.fx.interval property can be used to change the animation interval only on browsers that do not support the window.requestAnimationFrame() method. That is currently only Internet Explorer 9 and the Android Browser. Once support is dropped for these browsers, the property will serve no purpose and it will be removed.

Solution: Find and remove code that changes or uses jQuery.fx.interval. If the value is being used by code in your page or a plugin, the code may be making assumptions that are no longer valid. The default value of jQuery.fx.interval is 13 (milliseconds), which could be used instead of accessing this property.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.andSelf() is deprecated and removed, use jQuery.fn.addBack()

Cause: The .andSelf() method has been renamed to .addBack() as of jQuery 1.9 to better reflect its purpose of adding back the previous set of results. The old alias was removed in jQuery 3.0.

Solution: Replace any use of .andSelf() with .addBack().

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.size() is deprecated and removed; use the .length property

Cause: The .size() method returns the number of elements in the current jQuery object, but duplicates the more-efficient .length property which provides the same functionality. As of jQuery 1.9 the .length property is the preferred way to retrieve this value. jQuery 3.0 no longer contains the .size() method.

Solution: Replace any use of .size() with .length.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.data() always sets/gets camelCased names

Cause: The page is attempting to set or get a jQuery data item using kebab case, e.g. my-data, when a my-data item has been set directly on the jQuery data object. jQuery 3.0 always exclusively uses camel case, e.g., myData, when it accesses data items via the .data() API and does not find kebab case data in that object.

Solution: Either 1) Always use the .data() API to set or get data items, 2) Always use camelCase names when also setting properties directly on jQuery's data object, or 3) Always set properties directly on the data object without using the API call to set or get data by name. Never mix direct access to the data object and API calls with kebab case names.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.removeAttr no longer sets boolean properties

Cause: Prior to jQuery 3.0, using .removeAttr() on a boolean attribute such as checked, selected, or readonly would also set the corresponding named property to false. This behavior was required for ancient versions of Internet Explorer but is not correct for modern browsers because the attribute represents the initial value and the property represents the current (dynamic) value.

Solution: It is almost always a mistake to use .removeAttr( "checked" ) on a DOM element. The only time it might be useful is if the DOM is later going to be serialized back to an HTML string. In all other cases, .prop( "checked", false ) should be used instead.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.offset() requires a valid DOM element

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.offset() requires an element connected to a document

Cause: In earlier versions of jQuery, the .offset() method would return a value of { top: 0, left: 0 } for some cases of invalid input. jQuery 3.0 throws errors in some of these cases. The selected element in the jQuery collection must be a DOM element that is currently in a document. Text nodes, the window object, plain JavaScript objects, and disconnected elements are not valid input to the .offset() method. jQuery may throw an error in those cases but in general does not guarantee specific results with invalid inputs.

Solution: Do not attempt to get or set the offset information of invalid input.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.param() no longer uses jQuery.ajaxSettings.traditional

Cause: As of jQuery 3.0, the serialization method jQuery.param is fully independent of jQuery's ajax module. As a result, it does not look at the jQuery.ajaxSettings.traditional flag that affects how form data is encoded. Note that the jQuery.ajax() method still honors this flag if you make a request through it.

Solution: To continue using the traditional flag, pass it explicitly: jQuery.data( myData, jQuery.ajaxSettings.traditional ).

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.swap() is undocumented and deprecated

Cause: The jQuery.swap() method temporarily exchanges a set of CSS properties. It was never documented as part of jQuery's public API and should not be used because it can cause performance problems due to forced layout. This method has been removed in jQuery 3.0.

Solution: Rework the code to avoid calling jQuery.swap(), or explicitly set and restore the properties you need to change.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.bind() is deprecated

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.unbind() is deprecated

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.delegate() is deprecated

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.undelegate() is deprecated

Cause:: These event binding methods have been deprecated in favor of the .on() and .off() methods which can handle both delegated and direct event binding. Although the older methods are still present in jQuery 3.0, they may be removed as early as the next major-version update.

Solution: Change the method call to use .on() or .off(), the documentation for the old methods include specific instructions. In general, the .bind() and .unbind() methods can be renamed directly to .on() and .off() respectively since the argument orders are identical.

JQMIGRATE: 'ready' event is deprecated

Cause: Using one of jQuery's API methods to bind a "ready" event, e.g. $( document ).on( "ready", fn ), will cause the function to be called when the document is ready, but only if it is attached before the browser fires its own DOMContentLoaded event. That makes it unreliable for many uses, particularly ones where jQuery or its plugins are loaded asynchronously after page load.

Solution: Replace any use of $( document ).on( "ready", fn ) with $( fn ). This approach works reliably even when the document is already loaded.

JQMIGRATE: Additional params for 'jQuery.easing' functions are not documented and redundant

Cause: Additional params for jQuery.easing methods were never documented and redundant, same behavior could be easily achieved by other means.

Solution: Instead of using time and duration arguments, etc; it is already sufficient to use only first "percentage" argument.

For example, if you want to implement Cubic function, then instead of old approach -

jQuery.easing.easeInCubic = function ( p, t, b, c, d ) {
    return c * ( t /= d ) * t * t + b;
}

You could achive same effect with -

jQuery.easing.easeInCubic = function ( p ) {
    return Math.pow( p, 3 );
}

See jQuery-ui commit for other possible cases.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.parseJSON is deprecated; use JSON.parse

Cause: The jQuery.parseJSON method in recent jQuery is identical to the native JSON.parse. As of jQuery 3.0 jQuery.parseJSON is deprecated.

Solution: Replace any use of jQuery.parseJSON with JSON.parse.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.isNumeric() should not be called on constructed objects

Cause: The intended use case of jQuery.isNumeric is to see if its argument is either already a number, or a string that can be converted to a number. In jQuery 3.0 some edge cases changed to not return the same values. In particular, a constructed object (one created with new MyObject()) that contains a .toString() method is never considered to be numeric, even if that method returns a string that could be converted to a number. Please do not taunt this method.

Solution: Either use a different test for being numeric, or call the object's .toString() method before calling the jQuery method: jQuery.isNumeric( myObject.toString() ).

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.unique is deprecated; use jQuery.uniqueSort

Cause: The fact that jQuery.unique sorted its results in DOM order was surprising to many who did not read the documentation carefully. As of jQuery 3.0 this function is being renamed to make it clear.

Solution: Replace all uses of jQuery.unique with jQuery.uniqueSort which is the same function with a better name.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.expr[':'] is deprecated; use jQuery.expr.pseudos

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.expr.filters is deprecated; use jQuery.expr.pseudos

Cause: The standard way to add new custom selectors through jQuery is jQuery.expr.pseudos. These two other aliases are deprecated, although they still work as of jQuery 3.0.

Solution: Rename any of the older usage to jQuery.expr.pseudos. The functionality is identical.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.fn.toggleClass( [ boolean ] ) is deprecated

Cause: Calling .toggleClass() with no arguments, or with a single Boolean true or false argument, has been deprecated. Its behavior was poorly documented, but essentially the method saved away the current class value in a data item when the class was removed and restored the saved value when it was toggled back. If you do not believe you are specificially trying to use this form of the method, it is possible you are accidentally doing so via an inadvertent undefined value, as .toggleClass( undefined ) toggles all classes.

Solution: If this functionality is still needed, save the current full .attr( "class" ) value in a data item and restore it when required.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.event.props are deprecated and removed

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.event.props.concat() is deprecated and removed

JQMIGRATE: jQuery.event.fixHooks are deprecated and removed

Cause: The code on the page has used the jQuery.event.props or jQuery.event.fixHooks data structures. These were used in previous versions to affect the properties that are copied from the native event to the jQuery event each time an event is delivered, but they had the potential to create performance issues. Versions of jQuery Mobile before 1.5 make use of this API and require jQuery Migrate to run properly.

Solution: The most popular use of these data structures are to add properties for touch or pointer events, and those properties are now supported by default with a newer high-performance approach in jQuery 3.0 that only retrieves the properties on first access. If you are using jQuery Mobile, check the jquerymobile.com site for updates. If you are using plugins such as pointerTouch or touchHooks, simply remove them as they are no longer needed.

JQMIGRATE: jQuery(window).on('load'...) called after load event occurred

Cause: The calling code has attempted to attach a load event to window after the page has already loaded. That means the handler will never run and so is probably not what the caller intended. This can occur when the event attachment is made too late, for example, in a jQuery ready handler. It can also occur when a file is loaded dynamically with jQuery after the page has loaded, for example using the $.getScript() method.

Solution: If a function fn does not actually depend on all page assets being fully loaded, switch to a ready handler $( fn ) which runs earlier and will aways run fn even if the script that contains the code loads long after the page has fully loaded. If fn actually does depend on the script being fully loaded, check document.readyState. If the value is "complete" run the function immediately, otherwise use $(window).on( "load", fn ).