A simple image server that handles dynamic resizing of images for use as a cache origin server
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README.md

jrj-image-server

A simple image server that handles dynamic resizing of images for use as an origin server to a cache like Amazon's CloudFront.

jrj-image-server logo

License

Copyright (c) 2012, Joseph R. Jones (jrj.org) Licensed under the MIT License.

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

What it does

This is a very basic image server, implemented in ColdFusion, which acts as an origin server for a cache. It allows you to quickly and easily resize images based on requests and let the result be cached.

The image resizing is slow-- this is NOT intended to be run on a front-end web server. The idea is to use as the origin server for a cache-- like, for example, [Amazon CloudFront] (http://aws.amazon.com/cloudfront/)

You just bake in an image tag with a source of http://myimagecache.domain.com/resized.cfm/w300/h400/filename.jpg where filename.jpg is the name of an image file in the root, and wXXX and hXXX "directory" names control the height and width of the resulting image.

It will show a file-not-found image if the specified file isn't in the directory, and will show a file-not-valid image if the specified file cannot be parsed.

404 Image

Demo Site

You can view a live demo here: http://image.jrj.org/test.cfm

Why do I need an image server?

Compared with most datatypes served by your web server, images are huge... and if your web site is like mine, there are a lot of them. They are second only to video in size, but most video these days is served via services like YouTube and Vimeo, so you don't have to deal with video files very often.

More importantly, supporting responsive web design means that images must frequently be resized. You'll need thumbnails ad often a couple of additional resolutions/sizes of each image to support your application. You can create and store each of these manually, but the amount of work involved to do that really adds up. (Quick math problem... if your site has 100 images, but you need a thumbnail and 3 sizes to support your reactive web design, now you're storing 400 images.)

Obviously, you could just use height and width tags in your HTML, but that means you're sending down more data than is needed for the displayed size, which chews through more bandwidth (read: cost) and increases load times for your web site.

I built jrj-image-server for my old blog-- the idea was that I would store a single, high-resolution version of all the images in a folder, but would reference them with a more expressive URL so that an appropriately sized image is returned.

<img src="http://www.jrj.org/resized.cfm/w600/somepicture.jpg">

This will return the somepicture.jpg file, but will first resize it to a maximum width of 600 pixels. So even if the original file is a massive, multi-megapixel image, I'll only send the browser the pixels it needs. (If the original image had a width of 600 pixels or less, I'd just send the original image and let the browser scale it.)

The issue with this type of approach, of course, is that resizing images is an expensive operation-- you don't want to do this for every request. Enter a caching server.

A cache server-- I use Amazon's excellent and affordable CloudFront server-- will accept all of these requests, and cache the result. So when that 600 pixel image is requested for the first time it's resized, but CloudFront stores the result so that I never have to resize it again. My "origin server" contains all of the original files and the resize code, but doesn't have to store any of the resized images.

CloudFront will distribute cached copies of the resized images to the "edge" of the network, with nodes across a massive global network. This means not only does your server have to serve fewer http requests, but your users get much faster, lower-latency response from an more geographically proximate edge server.

Another use for the image server (and the reason I am updating it) is to make it easy to serve super-high resolution images to high-DPI displays like the iPad 3 and future devices without making your image workflow harder. You are still just creating one image and deciding the final output size in your HTML and JavaScript.

Setting up CloudFront for use with jrj-image-server

This system should be compatible with just about any caching service, but since CloudFront is so easy and inexpensive to get up and running (and because it's what I'm familiar with) I'll provide a brief overview here.

CloudFront is really designed to distribute content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, but it works just as well with a non-S3 origin server.

Go to the [Amazon Web Services management console] (http://aws.amazon.com) and log in.

Click on the "CloudFront" tab, and click on "Create Distribution."

This will provide you with a simple wizard for creating a new CloudFront distribution. All you have to do is provide the hostname of your origin server, and select "match viewer" under protocol policy. The rest of the default settings should be fine, though obviously you can tweak further for your needs.

Once the disribution is set up, you will get back a hostname to use, something along the lines of XXX.cloudfront.net (where XXX is a random string of letters and numbers.)

You can optionally set up a friendlier CNAME - like, for example, I used to use "image.jrj.org" for my image cache.

Now you just use an image tag like the one below:

<img src="http://image.jrj.org/resized.cfm/w600/somepicture.jpg">

The browser will request that file from CloudFront. If it's already on one of the edge servers the browser will get a really fast response. If it's a URL that's never been requested before, then CloudFront will make a request to your origin server, and the result will be cached for future requests. Nice and simple!

What types of image resizing are available?

We're just relying on the underlying infrastructure here, nothing fancy.

Default is highestQuality (since we're only performing this operation once and caching the result) but you can specify any of the following algorithms on the URL:

  • highestQuality
  • highQuality
  • mediumQuality
  • highestPerformance
  • highPerformance
  • mediumPerformance
  • nearest
  • bilinear
  • bicubic
  • bessel
  • blackman
  • hamming
  • hanning
  • hermite
  • lanczos mitchell quadratic