An OpenCL device simulator and debugger
C++ C CMake Python Makefile Batchfile Shell
Latest commit 4c9047e Feb 26, 2017 @jrprice Leave __ENDIAN_LITTLE__ undefined if big endian
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README.md

Oclgrind

About

This project implements a virtual OpenCL device simulator, including an OpenCL runtime with ICD support. The goal is to provide a platform for creating tools to aid OpenCL development. In particular, this project currently implements utilities for debugging memory access errors, detecting data-races and barrier divergence, collecting instruction histograms, and for interactive OpenCL kernel debugging. The simulator is built on an interpreter for LLVM IR. This project is being developed by James Price and Simon McIntosh-Smith at the University of Bristol.

Binary releases can be found on the GitHub releases page:

https://github.com/jrprice/Oclgrind/releases

Build dependencies

To build this project, you will need LLVM and Clang 3.9 (or newer) development libraries and headers. If you build LLVM from source, it is recommended to enable optimizations to significantly improve the performance of Oclgrind (set CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE to Release or RelWithDebInfo).

You will need to use a compiler that supports C++11. Python should also be available in order to run the test suite.

Building on Linux and OS X (CMake)

The recommended method of building Oclgrind is via CMake.

When configuring the CMake build, you may be prompted to supply a value for the LLVM_DIR parameter (this shouldn't be necessary if LLVM is installed in a standard system location). This should be set to the directory containing your LLVM installation's LLVMConfig.cmake file (typically either ${LLVM_ROOT}/lib/cmake/llvm or ${LLVM_ROOT}/share/llvm/cmake/). If Clang is installed separately to LLVM, then you may also be prompted to supply a path for the CLANG_ROOT parameter, which should be the root of your Clang installation (containing the bin/, lib/ and include/ directories).

A typical CMake command-line might look like this:

cmake ${OCLGRIND_SOURCE} \
      -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=RelWithDebInfo \
      -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=${INSTALL_ROOT} \
      -DLLVM_DIR=${LLVM_ROOT}/lib/cmake/llvm

where ${OCLGRIND_SOURCE} is the path to the root directory containing the Oclgrind source code, ${LLVM_ROOT} is the path to the LLVM installation, and ${INSTALL_ROOT} is the desired installation root directory (this can be omitted if installing to system directories).

Next, build and install with make:

make
make test
make install

If installing to a non-system location, you should add the bin/ directory to the PATH environment variable in order to make use of the oclgrind command. If you wish to use Oclgrind via the OpenCL ICD loader (optional), then you should create an ICD loading point by copying the oclgrind.icd file from the build directory to /etc/OpenCL/vendors/.

Building on Windows

Building Oclgrind on Windows requires Visual Studio 2013 (or newer), and Windows 7 (or newer). Compiling against recent versions of LLVM may require Visual Studio 2015.

When configuring the CMake build, you may be prompted to supply a value for the LLVM_DIR parameter. This should be set to the directory containing your LLVM installation's LLVMConfig.cmake file (for example C:\Program Files\LLVM\lib\cmake\llvm). If Clang is installed separately to LLVM, then you may also be prompted to supply a path in the CLANG_ROOT parameter, which should be the root of your Clang installation (containing the bin/, lib/ and include/ directories).

You should add the bin directory of the Oclgrind installation to the PATH environment variable in order to make use of the oclgrind command. If you wish to use Oclgrind via the OpenCL ICD loader (optional), then you should also create an ICD loading point. To do this, you should add a REG_DWORD value to the Windows Registry under one or both of the registry keys below, with the name set to the absolute path of the oclgrind-rt-icd.dll library and the value set to 0.

Key for 32-bit machines or 64-bit apps on a 64-bit machine: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Khronos\OpenCL\Vendors

Key for 32-bit apps on a 64-bit machine: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Khronos\OpenCL\Vendors

Usage

The recommended method of running an application with Oclgrind is to use the oclgrind command, for example:

oclgrind ./application

This command will make it such the only OpenCL platform and device available to your application is Oclgrind. If you need more control over platform selection then installing an ICD loading point for Oclgrind will cause it to appear when an application calls clGetPlatformIDs(), alongside any other OpenCL platforms installed on your system.

If it encounters any invalid memory accesses, Oclgrind will report the details to stderr, for example:

Invalid write of size 4 at global memory address 0x1000000000040
    Kernel:  vecadd
    Entity:  Global(16,0,0) Local(0,0,0) Group(16,0,0)
    store i32 %tmp9, i32 addrspace(1)* %tmp15, align 4
    At line 4 of input.cl
      c[i] = a[i] + b[i]

Since it is interpreting an abstract intermediate representation and bounds-checking each memory access, Oclgrind will run quite slowly (typically a couple of orders of magnitude slower than a regular CPU implementation). Therefore, it is recommended to run your application with a small problem if possible.

To enable an interactive, GDB-style debugging session, supply the -i flag to the oclgrind command, or export the environment variable OCLGRIND_INTERACTIVE=1. This will cause Oclgrind to automatically break at the beginning of each kernel invocation, and upon encountering an invalid memory access. Type help for details of available commands.

For more detailed information about using Oclgrind please visit the GitHub Wiki:

https://github.com/jrprice/Oclgrind/wiki/

Contact

If you encounter any issues or have any questions, please use the GitHub issues page:

https://github.com/jrprice/Oclgrind/issues

You can also contact the primary developer via email:

James Price <j.price@bristol.ac.uk>