Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP
Fetching contributors…

Cannot retrieve contributors at this time

293 lines (220 sloc) 5.93 kb

Slop

Slop is a simple option parser with an easy to remember syntax and friendly API.

Installation

Rubygems

gem install slop

GitHub

git clone git://github.com/injekt/slop.git
gem build slop.gemspec
gem install slop-<version>.gem

Usage

# parse assumes ARGV, otherwise you can pass it your own Array
opts = Slop.parse do
  on :v, :verbose, 'Enable verbose mode'   # A boolean option
  on :n, :name=, 'Your name'               # This option requires an argument
  on :s, :sex, 'Your sex', true            # So does this one
  on :a, :age, 'Your age', optional: true  # This one accepts an optional argument
  on '-D', '--debug', 'Enable debug'       # The prefixed -'s are optional
end

# if ARGV is `-v --name 'lee jarvis' -s male`
opts.verbose? #=> true
opts.name?    #=> true
opts[:name]   #=> 'lee jarvis'
opts.age?     #=> false
opts[:age]    #=> nil

For more information about creating options, see the Creating Options wiki page.

You can also return your options as a Hash

opts.to_hash #=> { :name => 'Lee Jarvis', :verbose => true, :age => nil, :sex => 'male' }

If you want some pretty output for the user to see your options, you can just send the Slop object to puts or use the help method.

puts opts
puts opts.help

Will output something like

-v, --verbose      Enable verbose mode
-n, --name         Your name
-a, --age          Your age

You can also add a banner using the banner method

opts = Slop.parse do
  banner "Usage: foo.rb [options]"
end

Helpful Help

Long form:

Slop.parse do
  ...
  on :h, :help, 'Print this help message', :tail => true do
    puts help
    exit
  end
end

Shortcut:

Slop.parse :help => true do
      ...
end

Parsing

Slop's pretty good at parsing, let's take a look at what it'll extract for you

Slop.parse(:multiple_switches => false) do
  on 's', 'server='
  on 'p', 'port=', :as => :integer
  on 'username=', :matches => /[^a-zA-Z]+$/
  on 'password='
end

Now throw some options at it:

-s ftp://foobar.com -p1234 --username=FooBar --password 'hello there'

Here's what we'll get back

{
  :server => "ftp://foobar.com",
  :port => 1234,
  :username => "FooBar",
  :password => "hello there"
}

Events

If you'd like to trigger an event when an option is used, you can pass a block to your option. Here's how:

Slop.parse do
  on :V, :version, 'Print the version' do
    puts 'Version 1.0.0'
    exit
  end
end

Now when using the --version option on the command line, the trigger will be called and its contents executed.

Yielding Non Options

If you pass a block to Slop#parse, Slop will yield non-options as they're found, just like OptionParser does it.

opts = Slop.new do
  on :n, :name, :optional => false
end

opts.parse do |arg|
  puts arg
end

# if ARGV is `foo --name Lee bar`
foo
bar

Negative Options

Slop also allows you to prefix --no- to an option which will force the option to return a false value.

opts = Slop.parse do
  on :v, :verbose, :default => true
end

# with no command line options
opts[:verbose] #=> true

# with `--no-verbose`
opts[:verbose] #=> false
opts.verbose?  #=> false

Short Switches

Want to enable multiple switches at once like rsync does? By default Slop will parse -abc as the options a b and c and set their values to true. If you would like to disable this, you can pass multiple_switches => false to a new Slop object. In which case Slop will then parse -fbar as the option f with the argument value bar.

Slop.parse do
  on :a, 'First switch'
  on :b, 'Second switch'
  on :c, 'Third switch'
end

# Using `-ac`
opts[:a] #=> true
opts[:b] #=> false
opts[:c] #=> true

Slop.parse(:multiple_switches => false) do
  on :a, 'Some switch', true
end

# Using `ahello`
opts[:a] #=> 'hello'

Lists

You can of course also parse lists into options. Here's how:

opts = Slop.parse do
  opt :people, true, :as => Array
end

# ARGV is `--people lee,john,bill`
opts[:people] #=> ['lee', 'john', 'bill']

Slop supports a few styles of list parsing. Check out this wiki page for more info.

Strict Mode

Passing strict => true to Slop.parse causes it to raise a Slop::InvalidOptionError when an invalid option is found (false by default):

Slop.new(:strict => true).parse(%w/--foo/)
# => Slop::InvalidOptionError: Unknown option -- 'foo'

Features

Check out the following wiki pages for more features:

Woah woah, why you hating on OptionParser?

I'm not, honestly! I love OptionParser. I really do, it's a fantastic library. So why did I build Slop? Well, I find myself using OptionParser to simply gather a bunch of key/value options, usually you would do something like this:

require 'optparse'

things = {}

opt = OptionParser.new do |opt|
  opt.on('-n', '--name NAME', 'Your name') do |name|
    things[:name] = name
  end

  opt.on('-a', '--age AGE', 'Your age') do |age|
    things[:age] = age.to_i
  end

  # you get the point
end

opt.parse
things #=> { :name => 'lee', :age => 105 }

Which is all great and stuff, but it can lead to some repetition. The same thing in Slop:

require 'slop'

opts = Slop.parse do
  on :n, :name=, 'Your name'
  on :a, :age=, 'Your age', :as => :int
end

opts.to_hash #=> { :name => 'lee', :age => 105 }
Jump to Line
Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.