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Library for converting CSS style blocks into inline styles in an HTML document. Specifically this is intended for the ease of generating HTML emails. This is useful as even in 2015 Gmail and Hotmail don't support top level <style> declarations.
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README

NAME
    CSS::Inliner - Library for converting CSS <style> blocks to inline
    styles.

SYNOPSIS
    use CSS::Inliner;

    my $inliner = new CSS::Inliner();

    $inliner->read_file({ filename => 'myfile.html' });

    print $inliner->inlinify();

DESCRIPTION
    Library for converting CSS style blocks into inline styles in an HTML
    document. Specifically this is intended for the ease of generating HTML
    emails. This is useful as even in 2015 Gmail and Hotmail don't support
    top level <style> declarations.

METHODS
  new
    Instantiates the Inliner object. Sets up class variables that are used
    during file parsing/processing. Possible options are:

    html_tree - (optional) Pass in a fresh unparsed instance of
    HTML::Treebuilder

    NOTE: Any passed references to HTML::TreeBuilder will be substantially
    altered by passing it in here...

    strip_attrs - (optional) Remove all "id" and "class" attributes during
    inlining

    leave_style - (optional) Leave style/link tags alone within <head>
    during inlining

    relaxed - (optional) Relaxed HTML parsing which will attempt to
    interpret non-HTML4 documents.

    NOTE: This argument is not compatible with passing an html_tree.

    agent - (optional) Pass in a string containing a preferred user-agent,
    overrides the internal default provided by the module for handling
    remote documents

  fetch_file
    Fetches a remote HTML file that supposedly contains both HTML and a
    style declaration, properly tags the data with the proper charset as
    provided by the remote webserver (if any). Subsequently calls the read
    method automatically.

    This method expands all relative urls, as well as fully expands the
    stylesheet reference within the document.

    This method requires you to pass in a params hash that contains a url
    argument for the requested document. For example:

    $self->fetch_file({ url => 'http://www.example.com' });

    Note that you can specify a user-agent to override the default
    user-agent of 'Mozilla/4.0' within the constructor. Doing so may avoid
    certain issues with agent filtering related to quirky webserver configs.

    Input Parameters: url - the desired url for a remote asset presumably
    containing both html and css charset - (optional) programmer specified
    charset for the pass url

  read_file
    Opens and reads an HTML file that supposedly contains both HTML and a
    style declaration, properly tags the data with the proper charset if
    specified. It subsequently calls the read() method automatically.

    This method requires you to pass in a params hash that contains a
    filename argument. For example:

    $self->read_file({ filename => 'myfile.html' });

    Additionally you can specify the character encoding within the file, for
    example:

    $self->read_file({ filename => 'myfile.html', charset => 'utf8' });

    Input Parameters: filename - name of local file presumably containing
    both html and css charset - (optional) programmer specified charset of
    the passed file

  read
    Reads passed html data and parses it. The intermediate data is stored in
    class variables.

    The <style> block is ripped out of the html here, and stored separately.
    Class/ID/Names used in the markup are left alone.

    This method requires you to pass in a params hash that contains scalar
    html data. For example:

    $self->read({ html => $html });

    NOTE: You are required to pass a properly encoded perl reference to the
    html data. This method does *not* do the dirty work of encoding the html
    as utf8 - do that before calling this method.

    Input Parameters: html - scalar presumably containing both html and css
    charset - (optional) scalar representing the original charset of the
    passed html

  detect_charset
    Detect the charset of the passed content.

    The algorithm present here is roughly based off of the HTML5 W3C working
    group document, which lays out a recommendation for determining the
    character set of a received document, which can be seen here under the
    "determining the character encoding" section:
    http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/syntax.html

    NOTE: In the event that no charset can be identified the library will
    handle the content as a mix of UTF-8/CP-1252/8859-1/ASCII by attempting
    to use the Encoding::FixLatin module, as this combination is relatively
    common in the wild. Finally, if Encoding::FixLatin is unavailable the
    content will be treated as ASCII.

    Input Parameters: content - scalar presumably containing both html and
    css charset - (optional) programmer specified charset for the passed
    content ctcharset - (optional) content-type specified charset for
    content retrieved via a url

  decode_characters
    Implement the character decoding algorithm for HTML as outlined by the
    various working groups

    Basically apply best practices for determining the applied character
    encoding and properly decode it

    It is expected that this method will be called before any calls to
    read()

    Input Parameters: content - scalar presumably containing both html and
    css charset - known charset for the passed content

  inlinify
    Processes the html data that was entered through either 'read' or
    'read_file', returns a scalar that contains a composite chunk of html
    that has inline styles instead of a top level <style> declaration.

  query
    Given a particular selector return back the applicable styles

  specificity
    Given a particular selector return back the associated selectivity

  content_warnings
    Return back any warnings thrown while inlining a given block of content.

    Note: content warnings are initialized at inlining time, not at read
    time. In order to receive back content feedback you must perform
    inlinify first

Sponsor
    This code has been developed under sponsorship of MailerMailer LLC,
    http://www.mailermailer.com/

AUTHOR
     Kevin Kamel <kamelkev@mailermailer.com>

CONTRIBUTORS
     Dave Gray <cpan@doesntsuck.com>
     Vivek Khera <vivek@khera.org>
     Michael Peters <wonko@cpan.org>
     Chelsea Rio <chelseario@gmail.com>

LICENSE
    This module is Copyright 2015 Khera Communications, Inc. It is licensed
    under the same terms as Perl itself.

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