extends Date.prototype with convenince methods
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README.md

superdate

Superdate is a functional convenience library for working with Date objects. I decided I really hated having to write:

var date = new Date()
// I want to add two days
date.setDate(date.getDate() + 2)

and decided to embark on writing this library. Originally it used to extend the Date.prototype object, now refactored to have the same functionality, but also to be 100% functional, using only pure functions.

Instead of the above code to change the date by a couple days, with superdate, you just call the addDate method:

var newDate = superdate.addDate(date, 2);

Superdate provides functionality to stuff like:

  • find the first Tuesday in a month
  • add/subtract any relevant part of a date (year, month, milisecond, etc.)
  • advance your date three Tuesdays into the future
  • parse date differences from speech ("Set that for three days from now")
  • a whole lot more.

To check out all the methods, see the source or the tests (for examples).

installing

Superdate can be installed via npm:

npm install superdate

building, cleaning, testing

To build the script, run gulp build To run the tests, run gulp test To clean, run gulp clean

usage

const superdate = require('superdate');
const date = new Date(2015,6,17); // July 4, 2015

// computations on date object
superdate.addDay(date); // July 5, 2015
superdate.addDay(date, 10); // July 14, 2015
superdate.addMonth(date); // August 4, 2015
console.log(superdate.resolveMonth('January')); // 0
console.log(superdate.dayOfWeek('Sunday')); // 0

// get information about dates surrounding your date object
superdate.getFirstDayOfMonth() // 3 (Wednesday, July 1)
let nextSundayDate = superdate.getNextDayInstance(date, 0); // July 5, 2015

let numDaysLeftInYear = superdate.daysLeftInYear(date); // 180

Again, for a more complete look, check out the tests. Many of the methods have optional parameters that will default to the current date's properties if omitted (month would resolve to new Date.getMonth(), for example, if omitted from a method).