Around the World in X Wikipedia Articles
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LICENCE
README.md
first edition.html
novel.php
second edition.html

README.md

nanogenmo-2015

Around the World in X Wikipedia Articles - generating a 50,000 word novel using Wikipedia's API to pull out location coordinates and descriptions. Written for NaNoGenMo 2015.

First edition: http://kevan.org/nanogenmo/2015firstedition.html (108,850 words, 1.2Mb)

Second edition: http://kevan.org/nanogenmo/2015secondedition.html (117,303 words, 723k)

The first edition includes a wayfinding bug where the narrator passed the New York checkpoint without triggering it, and was left to circle the globe until the script ran out of memory and crashed. The second edition was generated after a small post-November bugfix.

Sample text

Thunder cracked in the distance as we approached St George's Cathedral, Southwark. Unless I was very much mistaken, this was caused by incendiary bombing Opened in 1848. I remembered it was designed by Augustus Pugin. It seemed quite suitable for the Convocations of the Academy of Saint Cecilia. We noted copyright material being used.

Moving on, we arrived at London South Bank University. If I remembered correctly, this was founded in 1892 as the Borough Polytechnic Institute. Passepartout asked me if it was chosen to be clerk to the Governing Body, but I did not know. Passepartout examined the training and demonstrating Centre for Efficient and Renewable Energy in Buildings (CEREB). Passepartout explained how it had been designed to include two Thames barges set above a pentagon surrounded by five other pentagons. We moved on, disappointed by stricter student visa requirements in the United Kingdom.

Passepartout and I walked to Metro Central Heights. Passepartout told me it was originally known as Alexander Fleming House. It was clearly not known at the time of construction. Passepartout was unimpressed by some 400 studio to three-bedroom flats which are in constant demand. We met Ernő, a college friend of mine who was passing by.

We wandered to Elephant & Castle tube station. Imagine my surprise to learn it was approved on 25 July 1890! Passepartout asked me if it was given of a private bill that would be presented to Parliament for the construction of the BS&WR, but I did not know. It seemed handy for the Bakerloo line. We took advantage of the most direct access to the Bakerloo line.