Skip to content
Easy model mapping
PHP
Find file
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Failed to load latest commit information.
src/Mantle
tests
.gitignore
CONTRIBUTING.md
LICENSE
README.md
composer.json
phpunit.xml.dist

README.md

Mantle

Mantle makes it easy to write a simple model layer for your PHP applications.

Installation

Via Composer:

{
    "require": {
        "mantle/mantle": "~1.0"
    }
}

Usage

What's wrong with the way models are usually written in PHP?

Let's use the GitHub API as an example. How would one usually represent a GitHub issue in PHP?

<?php
class Issue
{
    const STATE_CLOSED  = 0;
    const STATE_OPEN    = 1;

    /** @var string */
    public $url;

    /** @var string */
    public $htmlUrl;

    /** @var integer */
    public $number;

    /** @var integer */
    public $state;

    /** @var string */
    public $reporterLogin;

    /** @var User */
    public $assignee;

    /** @var DateTime */
    public $updatedAt;

    /** @var string */
    public $title;

    /** @var string */
    public $body;
}

Seems perfectly fine! Now, what happens when we want to map a JSON response from the GitHub API to this model? We end up with a lot of mapping code:

<?php
$json = ...; // Get response from GitHub API

$assignee   = new User();
$issue      = new Issue();

$issue->url             = $json->url;
$issue->htmlUrl         = $json->html_url;
$issue->number          = $json->number;
$issue->updatedAt       = new \DateTime($json->updated_at);

$issue->title           = $json->title;
$issue->body            = $json->body;

$issue->reporterLogin   = $json->user->login;
$issue->assignee        = $assignee;

$issue->state           = $json->state == 'open' ? Issue::STATE_OPEN : Issue::STATE_CLOSED;

// And even more code to parse the assignee property!

Whoaw, that is a lot of boilerplate code for something that is so common! And even now there are still issues:

  • If the url or html_url fields are missing in the response, an error will be thrown;
  • There is no way to update a Issue with new data from the server;

    Insert Mantle

This is where Mantle comes in! Using Mantle, the above code can be changed into:

use Mantle\Mantle;

$json = ...; // Get response from GitHub API

$issue  = Mantle::transform($json, 'Issue');

It's that easy! Mantle will try and build the object by looking at properties in the class that you specifiy (it should be the FQCN) and it will even try to convert camelCase names to snake_case!

Property mapping

The only thing it will not do (and that's a good thing, since it won't know what to do) is convert nested properties (such as the reporterLogin property).

Luckily, you won't have to do that by hand after the Issue object is created! Mantle will try and look for a getPropertyMapping method in your Model class, and if it exists, use that mapping over the one it creates by itself. That means that our Issue model has to be extended a little bit:

<?php
class Issue
{
    // Properties

    public function getPropertyMapping()
    {
        return array(
            'reporterLogin' => 'user.login'
        );
    }
}

Mantle expects that an array is returned from the getPropertyMapping method in which the keys of the array are the properties of the model and the values are JSON key-paths. If you don't implement this method, Mantle will still work, it just won't handle nested values.

If there are some properties that exist both in the model and the JSON object that you (for some reason) don't want mapped, you can set a null value as the value for the property:

<?php
return array(
    'unmapped-property' => null
);

Transformers

If we look at the Issue model again, there are some things that might raise questions: the updatedAt, assignee and state properties.

You can let Mantle handle this too by specifying transformers. A transformer is a method that transforms an input value to another output value.

Transforming these properties is really easy. All you have to do is create some extra methods in your model. For the updatedAt and state properties, they might look something like this:

public function updatedAtTransformer($updatedAt)
{
    return new \DateTime($updatedAt);
}

public function stateTransformer($state)
{
    return $state == 'open' ? static::STATE_OPEN : static::STATE_CLOSED;
}

Mantle expects transformers to have the name [property]Transformer.

This leaves us with only one thing left: the assignee property. As usual, you'll only have to define one extra (really simple) method to transform this property:

public function assigneeClass()
{
    return 'User';
}

(It's assumed that a User class exists).

Mantle expects that you return the FQCN of the class for the class that you want the JSON object to be transformed into. It can even handle arrays for you! Let's say that you have a JSON response like so (not related to the GitHub API):

{
    "username": "bob",
    "tickets": [
        {
            "title": "Foo",
            "body": "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet"
        },
        {
            "title": "Bar",
            "body": "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet"
        },
        {
            "title": "Baz",
            "body": "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet"
        }
    ]
}

You can then (in a fictive User model) implement the ticketsClass method that returns (for example) Vendor\Project\Model\Ticket. Mantle will transform the tickets field in the JSON response into an array of Ticket models for you!

Existing objects

It happens (sometimes) that you want to update an existing object with new data from the server. Well, Mantle handles that too! Instead of passing class name as the second argument for Mantle you can pass an existing object:

<?php
use Mantle\Mantle;

$data = ...; // Fetch user data from somewhere

$user   = Mantle::transform($data, 'User');

// A lot of stuff happens, maybe some time passes

$data = ...; // Fetch fresh user data from somewhere
$user = Mantle::transform($data, $user);

The only requirement is that the $data passed is actually an stdClass object and not an array (an array wouldn't make sense in this case since you're only transforming a single object).

Data source

There's no requirement for what kind of data source you have to use. You can fetch data from a remote server or a local file or even create a stdClass object in the application itself and map it using Mantle!

Callbacks

An extra functionality in Mantle is the possibility to specify a callback that's called when the transformation of an object is complete. This way, it's possible to perform extra operations on each object in an array or a specific object without having to do extra work after the transformation. Basically, it changes the following piece of code:

<?php
use Mantle\Mantle;

$data = ...; // A list of users fetched from somewhere
$group = new Vendor\Project\Group();

$users = Mantle::transform($data, 'Vendor\Project\User');

foreach ($users as $user) {
    $user->setGroup($group);
}

To this:

use Mantle\Mantle;

$data = ...; // A list of users fetched from somewhere
$group = new Vendor\Project\Group();

$users = Mantle::transform($data, 'Vendor\Project\User', function ($user) use ($group) {
    $user->setGroup($group);
});

It's, of course, totally up to you whether you want to use a closure, the name of a function or even a class method!

Testing

Mantle is fully unit tested. The tests can be run with PHPUnit:

$ phpunit

Attributions

For those of you who are familiar with Objective-C, this library will look familiar. This is because it's based on the Objective-C library Mantle (that's why it's named the same way). If you ever need to have data-mapping in Objective-C, I can highly recommend it. I built this library because I wanted to have the same functionality in PHP.

Contributing

Please see CONTRIBUTING for details.

Credits

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see License File for more information.

Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.